MedSurg Nursing

  1. Ok guys, I am sorry to post this here......but who out there in the world of med surg nursing is stressed to the max more often than not?
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   passing thru
    are you in med or in surg? I think surgeons are more difficult to deal with than med docs.
    they all walk on water.

    what is your usual # of patients? There is never enough time to do everything that i want to do....
    just take personal satisfaction that i did the best i could....
    i know nurses who ice down a couple of beers for the drive home
    no kiddin!
  4. by   Lynn_RN
    I worked a busy surgery wing for two years at a small hospital before recently quitting and taking a job at a skilled nursing facility. I finally wised up and got tired of all the verbal abuse from the surgeons, the heavy patient load, with most patients rating high on acuity, and the nonsupportive, indifferent attitude of management. I love my new job and the pay is even better.
  5. by   plumrn
    We feel this way often. I agree, surgeons seem to be more demanding. Working 12.5 hr shifts, with only time for a quick 30min lunch break, makes for a long, hard day. Never enough time to get everything done. Always afraid, hurrying the way we do, that I'll make a terrible mistake. Very stressful, but still I love it. One pt telling you what a difference you made, keeps you coming back.
    At least now while I am young enough to stand up to it. I can't see doing this in my later years.
  6. by   Teshiee
    That is why it is so hard to fill med surg nursing positions too much damn abuse for little pay.
  7. by   zudy
    I think med/surg nursing is extremely tough. I haven't done it in years. Here's a big thank-you from an ED nurse to all of you nurses working your buns off in med/surg, we couldn't do it without you!
  8. by   Rapheal
    Hey Zudy,

    Thanks for the appreciation. ED nurses rock too.

    Incognito- It is soooo tough. Where I work they are constantly sending people home for lack of work,(but yet our census is high) and the rest of the staff is just expected to pick up the slack. I am going to a unit as soon as I get enough experience. Have a position lined up.

    I feel bad every day because I failed to meet the needs and expectations of my patients. I decided I am NOT working more than 45 minutes over my shift anymore. I get tired of being expected to care for my primary assignment and then get 4 or more admissions during the last 2 hours of my shift. If I keep working the 1-2 hours over it just gives them more reason NOT to address the nurse to patient ratio properly.

    And if they think I am not giving enough because I cannot (cannot versus will not) get it all done-then I will leave sooner then expected. I am not going to lose my license over their greed for money. It is the patients who suffer.
  9. by   Agnus
    :angel2: :kiss ((((med surg nurses)))))
  10. by   PhePhe
    I am a returning nurse and I worked both Med Surg and Psych for the last 5 months (I took a refresher course too). Now I only want to work pysch--I realized med/surg is why I left nursing in the first place. The staff is miserable and unhappy, the patient load and acuity are high, the nurses aides are difficult to work with--the list goes on. I only work psych now--what a shame I only lasted a few months in med/surg before being driven out again.
  11. by   RN-PA
    Originally posted by zudy
    I think med/surg nursing is extremely tough. I haven't done it in years. Here's a big thank-you from an ED nurse to all of you nurses working your buns off in med/surg, we couldn't do it without you!
    Originally posted by Agnus
    :angel2: :kiss ((((med surg nurses)))))
    :kiss to zudy-- I could NEVER do what ED nurses do-- Hats off to you! And :kiss to Agnus-- Thank you!

    And PhePhe, I'm sorry you got driven out of Med/Surg; I totally understand and empathize. I don't want to work anywhere else but Med/Surg, but there are nights I consider quitting nursing all together and being a checker at our local supermarket.

    Rapheal said, "I feel bad every day because I failed to meet the needs and expectations of my patients. I decided I am NOT working more than 45 minutes over my shift anymore. I get tired of being expected to care for my primary assignment and then get 4 or more admissions during the last 2 hours of my shift. If I keep working the 1-2 hours over it just gives them more reason NOT to address the nurse to patient ratio properly."

    I've pretty much adopted the same philosophy; I used to never pass stuff on to night shift since they were extremely poorly staffed. Now they have the same nurse to patient ratios as my 3 to 11 shift (6 to 7 patients/nurse) and I'm passing stuff on to them with no guilt feelings. I've also tried to slow my pace down-- for safety's sake (more chance of errors) and I just keep telling myself to "do the next thing". If I find I'm breathing heavily and getting upset, I just remind myself that I am ONE person and I will try to keep up with the demands, but they aren't paying us enough to go crazy. It's hard sometimes when a patient observes and comments on how busy we are and asks, "Are you short-staffed?" I have to bite my tongue because I don't want them worrying about their care, but sometimes...... :stone I'd like to shout from the rooftops how unfair the ratios are to both nurses and patients.
  12. by   VicChic
    As a student RN, I find all of these comments on Med-Surg interesting. I can appreciate the pros and the cons as a beginner. I understand, however, that this area would be more ideal to start my nursing career, because it gives the opportunity to master time management and all the basics in assessment and skill, and so forth without being too overwhelmed with critical care pts. So, with all of your comments being made, would you still recommend this area, or is there an alternative, that doesn't involve critical care?

    Thanks a bunch.
  13. by   RN-PA
    Originally posted by VicChic
    As a student RN, I find all of these comments on Med-Surg interesting. I can appreciate the pros and the cons as a beginner. I understand, however, that this area would be more ideal to start my nursing career, because it gives the opportunity to master time management and all the basics in assessment and skill, and so forth without being too overwhelmed with critical care pts. So, with all of your comments being made, would you still recommend this area, or is there an alternative, that doesn't involve critical care?

    Thanks a bunch.
    Hi VicChic! I started my nursing career in a LTC facility since no hospital positions were available when I graduated in '93. I'm thankful I started there because I learned time-management, organizational skills, and delegating (to CNA's) as well as getting more comfortable with caring for people (the residents). I learned so much (wound care, feeding tubes, caring for residents with dementia, assessment, communication skills and much more) and although aspects of it were stressful (especially depending on the facility and how many residents you are in charge of), it was not nearly as stressful as Med/Surg can be. Just my humble opinion.

    I still believe Med/Surg is a great starting place for new grads-- Much depends on nurse to patient ratios and the quality and length of your orientation. But LTC is often overlooked by new grads and it shouldn't be.
  14. by   VicChic
    Hey thanks RN-PA!

    I'd forgotten how much I learned in LTC clinical. You're absolutely right. And because those pts are for the most part stable, the unit is less stressful with just as much learning opportunity. Great!

    Any other suggestions out there?

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