MedSurg Nursing - page 2

Ok guys, I am sorry to post this here......but who out there in the world of med surg nursing is stressed to the max more often than not?... Read More

  1. by   Shell7280
    I work Agency, and usually work Med Surg and sometimes it's tough and sometimes I have really easy days. It also makes it easier if the people I work with are nice and helpful. Days like yesterday make it worth it....yesterday I had two old lady patients who kept hugging me and telling me how wonderful I was and everytime I left the room they'd say "thank you so much sweetie, I love you". That would make anyone smile and it makes you feel like you are doing something worth while.
  2. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by teshiee
    that is why it is so hard to fill med surg nursing positions too much damn abuse for little pay.
    i have worked on a busy med/surg floor and know the demands and sometimes unappreciativeness (is this a word) it brings.

    my question is, do you really believe money is the answer? i pose this because wouldn't "they" find more paper work, increase the pt load/nurse or acuity and such with the increase in pay?

    more money is good anytime, however, other factors seem to be more in order doing these times to eliminate or decrease the "shortage", you think?
  3. by   lilpoo_1
    I also work med surg nursing with a little oncology on the floor also. It is verrrry stressful up there and the staffing is dreadful. Luckily we have some tremendously wonderful aids to help us out. You do learn a lot on med surg and you definitely learn time management. But it is not a place that I would like to stay very long. I am going to put my time in and hopefully go back to OB where I did my internship.

    I give LTC nurses a lot of credit. I tried LTC nursing when I was almost done with school. I could not figure out what to do first to save my soul. So kudos to you.

    BTW, happy nurse's week to you all.
  4. by   MandyInMS
    ~~Raising hand high~~ stressed out 90% of the time incognito...typical med/surg night..last night: 6 pts....4 of whom TOTAL care...no ward clerk..no CNA..1 went bad and had to be transferred to CCU...got an admit 1 hour before shift was over..on my feet for at least 10 of my 12 hour shift..other 2 hours I got to chart.. my head is about to explode, my feet are killing me, and my back hurts like heck from all the pulling and tugging ALONE.Checking and double checking myself to make SURE I didn't miss anything.. Makes you wonder why we do it sometimes doesn't it?
  5. by   starcandy
    I have had LTC experience for years as a LPN. I am a RN nursing student now and cannot figure out what area to begin my career as a RN . I find it interesting that you consider LTC as a viable option for first time experience. I have never worked in a hospital setting and it was highly suggested to go into MedSurg nursing. After reading the past posts I am not sure this is what I want to do. Besides MedSurg and LTC what other alternatives would allow for a good starting experience in nursing? My ultimate goal is critical care, but I will like to build my skills up first.
  6. by   RN-PA
    Starcandy, if not a Med/Surg unit in a hospital setting, then how about a Telemetry unit or other Step-down unit? Our Telemetry unit (called PCU or Progressive Care Unit) has patients on vents and on monitors where you could learn skills that would be useful if your ultimate goal is critical care. Our PCU is busy but not usually as crazy as Med/Surg. Their nurse to patient ratio is less than Med/Surg, too.
  7. by   HollieRN
    My first clinical rotation was Med-Surg. It was extremely busy ... all the time. There was one RPN (LPN, LVN) to about 10 patients ... approximately 2 RPN's per team, and they got an RN who did meds for all 20.

    I was only there 2 days a week for a semester, but it drove me nuts. I dreaded it ... seriously. I defineatly do not want to do that again.
  8. by   starcandy
    Starcandy, if not a Med/Surg unit in a hospital setting, then how about a Telemetry unit or other Step-down unit? Our Telemetry unit (called PCU or Progressive Care Unit) has patients on vents and on monitors where you could learn skills that would be useful if your ultimate goal is critical care. Our PCU is busy but not usually as crazy as Med/Surg. Their nurse to patient ratio is less than Med/Surg, too.



    Thanks a lot for the info!!


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  9. by   majrn
    Originally posted by VicChic
    As a student RN, I find all of these comments on Med-Surg interesting. I can appreciate the pros and the cons as a beginner. I understand, however, that this area would be more ideal to start my nursing career, because it gives the opportunity to master time management and all the basics in assessment and skill, and so forth without being too overwhelmed with critical care pts. So, with all of your comments being made, would you still recommend this area, or is there an alternative, that doesn't involve critical care?

    Thanks a bunch.
    VicChick , You nailed it!!! Recommend it highly, you've got the right attitude and understanding. Do it (med-surg) before you branch out...Good luck. 15yr med-surg nurse.

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