Medication Aides - page 5

:confused: I am asking this question of you because I have looked for days for my answer and am still empty handed. I need to know where I might find information on medication aides and their... Read More

  1. by   azgirl
    The assisted living med techs get to watch a video on the 5 rights and give a rubber butt an injection and they are med techs. Scary isn't it?
  2. by   AmethystVeralyn
    Quote from night owl
    I've never heard of medication aides. Are you licensed to do this? And do you give out narcotics?
    The laws vary from state to state. In some states there are
    CNA 1s CNA2s CNA3s and CNA4s. In North Carolina if someone has been a CNA they can get CNA2 training where they are taught LPN procedures and then after that they can get training to be a med tech.
    CMTs do give out narcotics.
  3. by   AmethystVeralyn
    Quote from azgirl
    The assisted living med techs get to watch a video on the 5 rights and give a rubber butt an injection and they are med techs. Scary isn't it?
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    If this is the case where you live there must be some way
    you can have it changed. Do these people ever express
    fear over their lack of training? I've seen people
    be deathly afraid of passing meds or doing any skilled
    nursing tasks without proper training.
    I worked in a boarding house once where it was legal to
    pass meds as a CNA because I was a live-in and the
    state law was written to qualify live-ins as family
    members who can legally give meds.
    I was not expected to know what they were for or
    anything about them and there was no med book there.:stone
    I was never taught the rules of charting immediately
    for each patient or checking the med three times
    (which are important basic rules) I was only taught to
    read the book and set up the meds and give them.

    At that time I had only done injections on animals and
    was lucky to also have studdied them in a nursing class.
    When I mentioned that I
    needed to be oriented to giving shots I was asked,
    "What's the problem with giving the injections?" :uhoh21:
    I explained that when you give it in the wrong places you
    can paralyze someone. Also you risk getting intermuscular shots in a vein.

    It was only after explaining this that I was taught how to give injections.
    Last edit by AmethystVeralyn on Jul 24, '04
  4. by   AmethystVeralyn
    I worked as a CNA in a place where all CNAs were referred to as nurses even by the charge nurses. If someone would ask me a question about meds
    or an issue over my head I would always send them to
    the charge nurse.
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Quote from susanmary
    Flo, it is ILLEGAL for a CNA to tell
    patients he/she is a nurse just as it is illegal for a nurse to tell patients he/she is a doctor. This is quite serious & should be addressed.

    There is a reason nurses go to nursing school. We study hard -- learn nursing theory, CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS, pharmacology, and clinical skills. We learn to apply our theory to our practice & know the side effects of the medications we give our patients.
    We know when to question a med, hold a med, etc. There is so much to know -- we're not just passing meds -- it involves so much more. I don't even like other nurses to pass my meds for me -- I would NEVER (I'd quit first) delegate a med pass to a CNA even if it became legal. I've worked too hard for my license and the personal/professional liability is far too great.

    Have a wonderful healthy happy sunny weekend. Sue
  5. by   Rn2b204
    It is so amazing to me how nurses talk down on other professions like the one you are talking about in this thread CNA, CMA, and MA. I happen to be a CNA and have been for 12 yrs. I have also trained in the military as a EMT-B, and I have also got my Phlebotomy training as well. I have never passed meds, but I have started IV's , draw blood, did straight caths, foley caths, sterile and non-sterile wound care. I have also assisted in a codes and the physician when needed.In military we are allowed to give injections too.

    We are not trying to take your job some of us are happy with the jobs we have and just because we are not RNs doen't make us any less of a person. And if we are being refered to as a nurse just because we wear the same scrubs why is that so threatning to you??? I think the patient/ client see us as all PROFESSIONALS and may ask us a question that only a RN or LPN can answer that is fine. I wouldn't dare give advice on something that I don't know anything about and I would tell the person that I am not a nurse and have no problem referring them to one and I'm sure none of us do.

    I think if you feel as thought your license is on the line because the facility you work at staffs CNA, MA etc. then don't work there. But first some of you need to find out exactly what type of training we have instead of assuming and thinking just because we didn't go to school for 2+ years we don't know anything and we can't be taught. I know I was trained by RN's, Medical lab technologist, and Dr's.

    Most CNA's are using that as a stepping stone to becoming RN's one day and I think that is good for them and the nursing shortage.

    And to that person that made that coment on some CNAs not having a HS diploma but a GED....there are nurses that didn't graduate from high school and went on to get their GED and on to college. Yes, nursing schools except GED applicants. And what about a Nurse practitioner/ physician assistant she/he doesn't go through schooling nor training a doctor has should she be able to perform like a doctor and should the doctor take on that burden by having them work under them??? I don't think they complain as much as nurses do. And if they do I'm sure it's about something of importance.

    And some of us need to not be so cruel when talking about CNA, MA, etc. because there are some that all they want to do is be just that CNA or CMA.They don't need to hear nurses putting down the profession harping on how much school they had or didn't have and they are not competent because it wasn't as long as a nurse. It wasn't meant to be. You are missing the whole point.

    Nursing is so divided right now it's pitiful. Y'all complain about ADN, Diploma degrees, BSN on up to PH.D level.(who's the best, who's the greatest) The higher up one goes the more they seem to look down on each other when in fact you all sat for the same NCLEX to become REGISTERED NURSEs 1ST......or was it different??? NOPE!

    Just through that out there to say you all are never satisfied with other professions nor your own. STOP COMPLAINING AND HELP MAKE SOME CHANGES for the better. Don't just try to eliminate someones job because you feel your job is in jeopardy because of ones SCRUB OUTFIT AT WORK/ mistaken identity or because they have been certified to pass meds

    Some of y'all just sound miserable.....



    Rn2b204,

    I hope I will be an inspiration and not an irritation when I become and RN.


    sorry for this being so long and all the errors I get long winded at times.
  6. by   natasha700
    I can't for the life of me understand why someone would try to carve out a piece of what a nurse does and make it legal! There is more to just giving meds. There is a thought process involved. I agree another tactic of not paying a REAL nurse to do his/her job! Ridiculous!
    Last edit by natasha700 on Jul 25, '04 : Reason: left a word out
  7. by   wonderbee
    I'm a student RN working as a tech on a med/surg floor. This is what occurs to me. If as a tech/aid... whatever you want to call me, I'm drawing blood, taking VS Q4h, performing accuchecks, running 12-leads and administering medications, where do I find the time to bathe, feed, position, give mouth care, assist with elimination, transport and tend to the basic needs of our patients? My point is, this is no great advantage to the unlicensed assistive personnel either because they are going to get paid the same dollar for more work and responsibility. I dare say that my facility is getting more than their money's worth with the $10/h base pay I get. If I have to begin administering meds too, why not get my LPN license?

    Guess their going to have to create a position to assist the aides. It's all too crazy.
    Last edit by wonderbee on Jul 25, '04
  8. by   KacyLynnRN
    Quote from ERNurse752
    My cousin became a CNA, then a QMA, and she never even graduated high school (got a GED.)

    Excuse me...what does graduating from high school have to do with being a nurse?? I did not graduate high school, I got a GED, went to LPN school, am now an LPN, and am currently in an LPN to RN program. Just because I didn't graduate high school does not make me any less worthy of being a nurse, as you seem to insinuate! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
  9. by   ayndim
    Quote from Rn2b204
    It is so amazing to me how nurses talk down on other professions like the one you are talking about in this thread CNA, CMA, and MA. I happen to be a CNA and have been for 12 yrs. I have also trained in the military as a EMT-B, and I have also got my Phlebotomy training as well. I have never passed meds, but I have started IV's , draw blood, did straight caths, foley caths, sterile and non-sterile wound care. I have also assisted in a codes and the physician when needed.In military we are allowed to give injections too.

    We are not trying to take your job some of us are happy with the jobs we have and just because we are not RNs doen't make us any less of a person. And if we are being refered to as a nurse just because we wear the same scrubs why is that so threatning to you???
    First off the training a Corpsman or EMT in the military is nothing like that of a CNA. Military training is to the LPN level -- at least. But until they are an LPN or an RN they still are not a nurse.

    As for the CNA'a being called nurses. It threatens the patients! And I believe it is illegal (I am a prenursing student). And my understanding is if a CNA passes herself off as a nurse and gives advice the RN is still responsible and can lose their license as a result (not sure if an LPN who has a CNA working under her can lose hers/his too). So it also threatens their livelihood. Am I wrong, experienced ones? And while you may hear that an LPN also works under the RN's license. They are nurses and can call themselves nurses and have taken pharmacology, a&p and the first year of nursing an RN does (at least in my area). A CNA has no business not correcting an assumption they are a nurse.

    No one is saying a CNA is less of a person. But they do not have the same training and education as a nurse. And I would not want a CNA giving meds to me or my family members. But yes CNAs are an essential part of the healthcare team but I think there scope is getting a little too dangerous.
  10. by   Yancy SPN
    hello everyone. Medication Aide from Kansas, and let me tell you something about Medication Aides. I am very PROUD to be a CMA. I don't really care what others may think of CMA's because I'm really no different than anyone else in this forum. We all wear the same kind of scrubs and basically do the same thing as a LPN. Only I don't give injections. I have worked in Hospitals as a CNA11 and have done several cath placements, sterile and non sterile dressing changes, and hey, what do I care if you think that I'm not qualified to this kind of job. I believe in myself and I do my job just as well as any of you "NURSES" out there. You want to get defensive and say how Med Aides make med errors all the time, well hey, what about you Nurses out there making the fatal med errors, stealing narcs and whatnot. I'm just as human as you. Everyone makes mistakes, but hey, I geuss your PERFECT!!!! You obviously dont make any mistakes like us LOWER THAN DIRT PEOPLE WHO PASS MEDS AS A CMA. I'm very thankful the good Lord gave me the opportunity to learn and to advance my knowledge and my skills. I'm currently in Nursing School, and its helped me alot with knowing all the meds and what side effects there are and what can happen. i've been a med aid for 4 years now, and have had only 1 med error in those 4 years. How many med errors have you made as a nurse in your whole career?
  11. by   Yancy SPN
    Quote from ayndim
    First off the training a Corpsman or EMT in the military is nothing like that of a CNA. Military training is to the LPN level -- at least. But until they are an LPN or an RN they still are not a nurse.

    As for the CNA'a being called nurses. It threatens the patients! And I believe it is illegal (I am a prenursing student). And my understanding is if a CNA passes herself off as a nurse and gives advice the RN is still responsible and can lose their license as a result (not sure if an LPN who has a CNA working under her can lose hers/his too). So it also threatens their livelihood. Am I wrong, experienced ones? And while you may hear that an LPN also works under the RN's license. They are nurses and can call themselves nurses and have taken pharmacology, a&p and the first year of nursing an RN does (at least in my area). A CNA has no business not correcting an assumption they are a nurse.

    No one is saying a CNA is less of a person. But they do not have the same training and education as a nurse. And I would not want a CNA giving meds to me or my family members. But yes CNAs are an essential part of the healthcare team but I think there scope is getting a little too dangerous.
    CNA'S ARE NOT CONSIDERED NURSES WHERE I'M FROM. WE DO ALL THE "DIRTY" WORK FOR YOU NURSES BECAUSE YOUR A LITTLE TOO AFRAID OF GETTING YOUR HANDS DIRTY!!!!!!!
  12. by   ayndim
    Med aids, cma's and cna's are a far cry from being "basically the same as an LPN" I can't figure out if you are trying to stir up trouble or if you actually believe this. I am telling you this, no one but a qualified nurse (lpn or rn) will ever cath or pass meds to me or my family.

    I am not sure what you are so defensive about. No one said you are lower than dirt. No one said we thought less of you as a person. But I do not think a cna, cma or whatnot has the same level of training and education as a nurse. If that was true they wouldn't be paying nurses more money. And of course we are all human and no one said that nurses never make mistakes. And so what if you wear the same scrubs. I can put on a white coat but that doesn't make me as good as a dr. And even you admitted that even as a nursing student you are now aware of the side effects. Gosh don't you think that is important for someone to know when passing meds. Do cma's know how to look at lab values and phone the dr if the med isn't right to treat the values? Or do they just give the med because it was ordered. (Here I am asking as I don't know). And I have no problem getting my hands dirty. I better not as I want to work in l&d. I have worked in a group home and have bathed and changed adult diapers. I also have three little kids and I have been puked on, peed on and even once pooped on. I have had to stick my potty training son in the bath because of an accident. And for me poop, pee and vomit is all the same.

    I have to ask if you are so happy with your job why are you going back to school to be an LPN or RN? According to you, you are nearly as knowledgable as one now. Not that I don't think it is great that you are.
    Last edit by ayndim on Jul 25, '04
  13. by   AmethystVeralyn
    With all the discussion about CNAs and CMTs and CMAs and
    CNA 2s and LPNs I think it would be easier and take up less
    space if someone who can research this topic and post the laws
    in each state for all 50 states.
    This should include what levels are legal in each state,
    eg. CNA 2s CMTs CMAs
    What the prerequisites are for further training in each state.
    like one year as a CNA to get into CMA training.
    and how many hours are required in each state.

    It should be posted as a graph so it's easy to read.
    Then there should be some statistics on how many
    CMAs make med errors compared with how many RNs
    and LPNs and what percent of them were life threatening
    errors compared with how many harmless errors.



    There seems to be some confusion about how many hours
    are required in various places with the idea of, "two weeks,"
    being brought up a lot.

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