Medical terms you'd rather see changed.... - page 6

I hate saying "expired" for someone who is dead and I could also do without seeing "morbid obesity" or even obese in the chart. I know being overweight is a serious health issue, but those words... Read More

  1. by   banditrn
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I hate saying "expired" for someone who is dead and I could also do without seeing "morbid obesity" or even obese in the chart.

    I know being overweight is a serious health issue, but those words are so ugly to me.

    So, what are some medical terms you could do without or you think are strange?
    I hate the word 'obese', too. I used to see it a lot in history and physicals at the hospitals.
    I tend to be a little 'fluffy', altho I don't consider myself 'obese'!! I was going in for surgery, so I told the surgeon at our pre-surgery visit that I had every intention of reading his H&P, and nowhere did I want to see him describing me as 'obese white female'.:chuckle

    He handled it very well - he stated that I was a 'well-developed white female'!
  2. by   rnparrot
    this was a great thread. i couldn't agree more with all of you. the one that made me laugh the most is MURSE~! never heard that as a male nurse, but i HAVE heard it used to mean a MALE PURSE!!!
  3. by   seattledeb
    I loved being labeled with "Advanced Maternal Age" at 39 when I had better overall health at that time than many 25 year olds. Even worse "Senior or Aged Primipara"!
  4. by   abbythetabby
    Quote from loquacity
    i hate od,ou, os, ad,au,as, as abbreviations....they're confusing don't save time and you only save one letter as eye or ear are 3 letters long.
    Apparently you're not the only one. At all the hospitals where I've done clinicals (and in our texts), JCAHO notices have been posted that these abbreviations should no longer be used.
  5. by   MultipurposeRN
    I hate to see, "Patient complaining of _____"
    Makes it sound like they're all just whiny and gripey.
  6. by   tvccrn
    Quote from seattledeb
    I loved being labeled with "Advanced Maternal Age" at 39 when I had better overall health at that time than many 25 year olds. Even worse "Senior or Aged Primipara"!

    I'm 39 and have been labeled with "geriatric maternal age". I could have handled advanced, but GERIATRIC, come one!!

    tvccrn
  7. by   Chaya
    Quote from Dixielee
    While we are changing vocabulary, lets start with "Nurses Training". I don't know about you, but I received nursing EDUCATION at a University, not training at the doggie academy. I am not trained to jump thru flaming hoops (although some shifts feel like it), I make educated decisions. I cringe when I hear about nurses being trained.
    In a similar vein-the phrase "practicing" makes me shudder at the images it evokes; I've been working as a nurse long enough that I think I've got it down by now!
  8. by   Jamesdotter
    I don't like "student nurse". We were "nursing students" 50 years ago and the students at the medical school next door were "medical students" NOT 'student doctors" (except in jest, of course).
  9. by   DeLySh
    Quote from MultipurposeRN
    I hate to see, "Patient complaining of _____"
    Makes it sound like they're all just whiny and gripey.
    That one and when I see "pt denies tobacco use" or whatever I always think that it sounds like they were caught in a lie.:chuckle
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from mjlrn97
    ....I also loathe the term 'obese'---even if I weren't an English speaker, that's a word I'd want to stay away from. It sounds gross, and even though a lot of folks might consider obesity to BE gross, it's not helpful. What's wrong with using 'severe overweight' or even 'extreme overweight'?
    I say we start using the term "fluffy", as in the pt is extremely fluffy.

    A morbidly obese person could be called a "fluffee' grande' " to make it sound more medical.

    A mildly overweight person: Flufee' petite
    Moderately overweight: Flufee' Median.

    Now, ya'll have a good Thanksgiving and don't get all fluffed up!:
  11. by   MultipurposeRN
    LOL, Helllo! I like your terminology and vote that we make it official!
  12. by   steve0123
    There's nothing I like better than a debate over medical semantics...

    To those people who find the terms "non-compliant" and "denies" distasteful when used in the context of patient behaviour or responses to questioning, I say pull that stick out of that place it's sitting...

    The patient approaches the health care practitioner for help. The health care practitioner responds by prescribing a treatment regime. The patient either complies or does not comply with that regime, meaning they are either compliant or non compliant. "Non adherence", in this context, is a synonymous term, and the benefit of "increased patient autonomy" it offers is mere rhetoric: the patient is no more autonomous by not adhering to the prescribed regime as they are by not complying with it.

    Similarly, when a patient is asked a simple question, such as "are you a smoker?", and responds in the negative, they are confirming they are not a smoker by denying the alternative positive response. Thus, the patient denies being a smoker. When used in the context of a medical examination, it is possibly more accurate to state that the patient denies a direct question rather than interpreting their responses as gospel truth, as the health care practitioner may not be able to state with any great deal of certainty that the patient is in fact telling the truth. For example: "Mary, a 70y lady with chronic emphysema denies being a smoker..." seems a much more accurate record of interview than "Mary, a 70y lady with chronic emphysema has never smoked in her life...". The latter sentence of course suggesting the interviewer has intimate knowledge of every event occuring in Mary's life from birth to interview.

    Oh I love semantics...
  13. by   twotrees2
    Quote from Halinja
    When I was a young mom, I found out I was pregnant. I had one other child, and had miscarried once. While I was in the doctor's office, the nurse was taking a history, and when I said I'd miscarried she said, oh, you had an abortion. I said no. (not knowing that it was a medical term for miscarriage) She then said, how many times have you had an abortion? I said never. Anyway, it went around and around and never once did she explain that she didn't mean I'd gone in to some clinic somewhere and had an abortion, that it was a medical term. Not once. She wouldn't let it go and just say all right, how many miscarriages have you had. Nor would she explain. I ended up in tears, feeling attacked and feeling that she thought I was lying to her and had secretly been sneaking out to have dozens of abortions in a clinic somewhere.

    Every time I see the word in paperwork it reminds me of that afternoon, and if I ever have to use it to a patient, I am very careful to explain in what way we are using the word. But I don't like the word. It has way too much emotional freight.
    im not an ob nurse and hatedit - but i recall something from school way back when that the diference medically between aborting a fetus and a miscarriage is the time one has been prgnant - dont recall the amount of time until miscarriage turns to the body aborting but seems i do recall a difference. i agree the conotations of the word abortion holds a stigma - perhaos they could use the term died in utero - thats what they classified my sisiter who died just prior to birth.

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