MDs find out about Nursing Shortage...... - page 2

Excellent article. The American Medical Association tells its members the true story.... Amednews.com American Medical Association HEALTH & SCIENCE Where's the nurse? Staffs stretched too... Read More

  1. by   NursePooh
    Originally posted by majic65:
    <STRONG> As for being unqualified to work in some areas--you not only can refuse such an assignment--YOU MUST!!! I'm an OB nurse--and gotpulled to the ICU one nite--not to "help", but to take an assignment. I refused--we ended up calling the DON at hojme at 11PM because the night super. wanted to fire me on the spot--DON backed me up! We HAVE to stick to our princiles!</STRONG>
    I had a similar experience. I arrived one night for my shift on my tele floor and was told I had to go to the ER. There was an agency nurse on tele that night, but she refused to be sent there (I resented that at first, then realized she was right to do so, since she wasn't qualified to take a team, and they would have expected her to). I had heard horror stories of tele coworkers being flung to the wolves in the ER, so the minute I arrived I sought out the supervisor and made my position clear. I would do whatever tasks they asked of me that I was qualified to perform, but I would NOT take responsibility for a team. They didn't even flinch, just gave in immediately. At first the ER nurses resented me for that, but when they had 8 critical care admits from the ER that night, they were very glad to have a tele nurse to do transport By the end of the night, they were trying to convince me to put in for a transfer
  2. by   ripley
    As an agency nurse, I was often assigned to tele floors when I do not read tele. This leads to frustration on my part and resentment on the part of the regular staff, which I fully understand. The problem is, try refusing assignments on floors that you don't feel qualified to work on and see how long you can keep your job. The truth is, hospitals want "warm bodies with a nursing license" and damn the r3esults. I was once sent to a chemo floor and when I protested I was told that it was really a Med/Surg floor with overflow chemo patients and that I would be assigned mostly medical/surgical patients. NOT TRUE!!!!!!!. Most or all of my patients were chemo patients. They actually asked me to hang chemo on a patient, and became quite upset when I refused,because they said it had already been precalculated and was ready to hang. I have no idea how to handle chemo drugd, what reactions to look for and what to do with the old bag of chemo that had just finished. I also refused to hang any "rescue drugs" which I understood as drugs to minimize the unwanted effects of the drugs on other parts of the body. The nurses were quite put out by this, as other people had gone ahead and hung the drugs.
    Refusing to do thingscan put you on a "DNR" (do not return) list. Also, one large hospital I was sent to was ,apparently, so busy that none of the nurses even offered to show me around, I had to ask. When I needed something I would ask another nurse and the typical reply was something like, "oh back there in one of those drawers". If one is trying to do good nursing and you must spend your shift asking where things are; what number to call for the resident,pharmacy,kitchen etc. it's difficult to get done on time and you are bound to miss things.
    I no longer work for agencies because I was frustrated at the quality of nursing I was able to give, and Yes...I had to ask where the bathroom was. My feeling about why nursing is in so much trouble is because the majority of us are still women. I notice a much different interaction between the male nurses and doctors. Plus, males usually go right into ER;OR,or ICU. What floor nurses do is (unfortunately) considered "women's work" and the hospitals know that because we are women and are used to being in a "caregiver" mode that we will break our backs to give good care to our patients no matter how short-staffed we are.We women need to be willing to stand up to authority as a united front and be willing to risk our jobs to get what we want, and many nurses- both the "baby-boomers" and their offspring have learned to get what they want by whining and *****ing and backstabbing, and we don't trust each another to stand fast if we try to put up a united front to administration. Women, we have to trust each other and stand up for ourselves.
    Ripley
  3. by   mattsmom81
    I'm glad docs are noticing ...AND they need to acknowledge the role they play in the 'shortage', by their browbeating of overworked nurses IMO.

    I also tire of agency nurses being used as scapegoats. One of the reaons I DO agency is to stay out of the self defeating , passive aggressive gameplaying that inevitably occurs in the downtrodden, abused hospital staffers. The docs on staff are players in this game. As agency, I can shrug them off and stay out of the fray in most cases. Really makes or breaks my career these days.

    The decent docs that take a moment to talk to me quickly recognize I'm an experienced nurse who knows what I'm doing. I may not be able to 'cater' to their petty whims and personal needs like the staff nurse who sees them everyday, but who really wants to? Not me (if I did I'd be on staff, right?) LOL.
  4. by   Katnip
    When I worked in IMCU we often had nurses float from med/surg to work. It was up to us with tele experience to monitor their patients and take care of the cardiac meds and drips. Most of the time it was just easier not to have the med/surg nurses there.

    I'm not knocking the nurses. They didn't felt way out of place and tried to help us out where they could. It was a blessing to have an agency nurse or traveler with tele experience.

    I think it's sad that it's going to take physician discomfort for administration to start treating nurses decently.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I wonder what the AMA says NOW more than 3 years later??? Anyone have a more current article?
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    And another thing:

    I don't think this should be an agency nurse versus so-called regular employee, either. I agree with the statement one person made: the hospitals are addressing a crisis (by using agency/travelers) they helped create in their greed in the last decade. Let's don't tear one another down or be pitted against each other.
  7. by   Shotzie
    Gosh, there are several cardiologists and a couple of surgeons that I would like to show this article to. Some of them took the >I AM A GOD< class more than once in med. school.
    I've worked with some wonderful docs in my career but the few absolutely awful ones made me enjoy imagining several horrendous and very painful deaths I could inflict upon them. Revenge is a wonderful fantasy-as long as it stays a fantasy!
  8. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Shotzie
    Gosh, there are several cardiologists and a couple of surgeons that I would like to show this article to. Some of them took the >I AM A GOD< class more than once in med. school.
    I've worked with some wonderful docs in my career but the few absolutely awful ones made me enjoy imagining several horrendous and very painful deaths I could inflict upon them. Revenge is a wonderful fantasy-as long as it stays a fantasy!
    LOL. I can think of a few docs I have come across that must have majored in >I AM A GOD< as undergraduates. I think that major puts you higher on the pick list for medical schools. At least it did. I haven't seen a new crop of residents in a while.
  9. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Wonderful article, jt. It gives me hope that someone out there finally "gets it."
  10. by   Shotzie
    You know RN4...That's the class they take as a senior. It follow Bad Handwritng 101 as a freshman, General Crankiness 202 as a sophmore and Arrogance & Ignoring the Need for an Apology When Wrong (Cause you can Never Admit you are Wrong) that is taken as a specialty elective as
    a Junior :chuckle

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