Mandatory Voluntary Extra?????

  1. I work as agency for a facility that mandates each nurse work a "voluntary extra" day. Is this the worst case of double speak you have ever heard? How can it be "voluntary" when it is mandated???
    No one asks questions or raises their eyebrows, they just sign up for their VX days, and go on. VX are the first to be cancelled, and they can't be pulled from their floor on their VX days, but still......
    In my book, mandatory and voluntary are opposites, not the same thing!!!
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  2. 29 Comments

  3. by   canoehead
    An oxymoron. It sure ain't voluntary in my book
  4. by   Tweety
    It must be illegal there to require mandatory overtime, so they call it "voluntary" to keep themselves out of trouble. Whatever.
  5. by   renerian
    Seems odd to me too?

    renerian
  6. by   CseMgr1
    Originally posted by KaroSnowQueen
    I work as agency for a facility that mandates each nurse work a "voluntary extra" day. Is this the worst case of double speak you have ever heard? How can it be "voluntary" when it is mandated???
    No one asks questions or raises their eyebrows, they just sign up for their VX days, and go on. VX are the first to be cancelled, and they can't be pulled from their floor on their VX days, but still......
    In my book, mandatory and voluntary are opposites, not the same thing!!!
    What a crock.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    like the others said

    an oxymoron......

    hmph.
  8. by   purplemania
    Write a letter to the HR Director asking him/her to please define the term. Don't give your comments. Just ask for theirs. How can you volunteer for something if you don't know what it is? What does HR policy say about OT? I find many of our nurses are not aware of policies, even though they are on the Intranet and every unit has access to the site, plus we have Internet Cafe in Cafeteria and website is accessible from home. THey depend on rumors to stay informed.
  9. by   sjoe
    Fortunately you are agency, so you don't have to worry about, nor get involved in trying to clarify/straighten out, stuff like this. People need to fight their own battles, and if they are unwilling to do so, then so be it. At least you know this is NOT the kind of facility where you want to work as a regular employee.

    As always:
    Last edit by sjoe on Sep 10, '03
  10. by   SirJohnny
    KaroSnowQueen:

    - I hope by "volunteering" -- you mean they have to work that day. Hopefully, they/you still get paid for that day.

    - Does any one jump on the chance to grab these extra days, in the hopes of making extra $$$.

    - Just curious.

    Thanks,

    John Coxey
    Last edit by SirJohnny on Sep 10, '03
  11. by   Eddye
    Originally posted by sjoe
    Fortunately you are agency, so you don't have to worry about, nor get involved in trying to clarify/straighten out, stuff like this. People need to fight their own battles, and if they are unwilling to do so, then so be it. At least you know this is NOT the kind of facility where you want to work as a regular employee.
    As always:
    Not to sound belligerent, but isn't this the same type of thinking that allows people to justify looking the other way when other things are wrong but don't directly affect them; say, just for example, when a doc is chewing a nurse for something (especially if it is something stupid) in front of co-workers/patients?
    Last edit by Eddye on Sep 10, '03
  12. by   jadednurse
    Originally posted by Eddye
    Not to sound belligerent, but isn't this the same type of thinking that allows people to justify looking the other way when other things are wrong but don't directly affect them; say, just for example, when a doc is chewing a nurse for something (especially if it is something stupid) in front of co-workers/patients?
    Why on earth should this agency nurse fight this battle when she isn't even staff at this hospital. She's an employee of the agency for crying out loud. That would be like a staff nurse calling an agency and complaining about thir policies and practices.

    Yes the policy stinks. Yes if I were a staff nurse there they'd hear from me, but if I were agency there...well, it's not my battle to fight.
  13. by   Eddye
    Jaded

    Interesting choice of a "handle". Does it say as much about you as it implies?
    For the record, I'm not saying she? should or should not get involved. I was simply asking if anyone agreed that the attitude about not getting involved is what allows everyone to simply turn their heads in the other direction because a wrongdoing "simply isn't my problem". It's one thing if no one cares, but it's quite another if you have to show up to work every day and hear people ******!ng all day/night because their management sux yet no one is doing anything about it.
  14. by   ktwlpn
    I don't remember Karo saying she wanted to fight over this-she posted this topic to discuss it...And-It is not appropriate for any non-employees to get involved in any type of labor dispute-if ya are not on the payroll ya don't need to be on the picket line...Not the same thing as turning a blind eye to a particular "wrongdoing" that does not effect them...In the case of a doctor "chewing out" a nurse-that NURSE needs to be professional and stand up for herself-the last thing that needs to happen is for staff to crowd around like kids on the playground and get involved..That gives the butthead an audience and almost always escalates the situation.......Many people work in Black holes-lots of people ***** and moan all day-and they are seldom the types that are willing to leave a bad situation or stick their necks out to try to make a positive change...They just like to bytch.If the rank and file are not talking with their feet then they must be content...If an agency nurse gets too involved with the politics of a facility she may find herself not invited back-and most agency nurses that I know do agency to stay OUT of that type of mess anyway....

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