Mandatory Overtime - page 2

Hello! This is my first time using a website such as this so bear with me! I am currently working full time in a hospice/palliative facility but mainly my experience is in med-surg. I am working... Read More

  1. by   jimthorp
    Quote from chuck1234
    Everybody hates it, but nobody can do anything about it!
    This is a defeatist attitude and incorrect.
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from chuck1234
    Everybody hates it, but nobody can do anything about it!
    That is just not true.


    steph
  3. by   chuck1234
    Quote from jimthorp
    This is a defeatist attitude and incorrect.
    "Defeatist attitude" and "incorrect."
    So...what can you do about it!
  4. by   chuck1234
    Quote from stevielynn
    That is just not true.


    steph
    So...you want to tell me the truth!
  5. by   hogan4736
    Quote from chuck1234
    "Defeatist attitude" and "incorrect."
    So...what can you do about it!
    one can:

    1) quit
    2) work the shift, then quit
    3) say no
    4) encourage co-workers to do the same
    5) decline the assignment - deem it as unsafe
    6) protest in fron of the hospital
    7) call the media
    8) write a letter to the editor, outlining 16-18 hour shifts that nurses are working taking care of their loved ones

    NONE of the above gets you in trouble w/ the nursing board...

    Enough w/ the apathy, stand up and say NO!
    Last edit by hogan4736 on Feb 5, '07 : Reason: more to say
  6. by   hogan4736
  7. by   jimthorp
    Quote from chuck1234
    "Defeatist attitude" and "incorrect."
    So...what can you do about it!
    Hogan took care of this for me.
  8. by   burn out
    why not lobby your state legislatures like other states have to get laws prohibiting mandatory overtime for nurses. One principle that help change the law here is if you can be ticketed for driving while you are too tired how is it you can be mandated to work and give meds and treat patients if you are still just as tired and lacking proper sleep. Nurses in my state and any one in the health profession can not be mandated to work over. The draw back to this is we no longer receive critical bonuses for shortages either.
  9. by   TrudyRN
    We have it and it stinks. Refusing to do it is supposed to result in a write-up but doesn't usually. Even if it does get written up, no one seems to have it held against them. I guess Management would use the write-ups against someone they want to fire or demote, though.

    LOL An ADON I used to work with once told an aide who had sitter trouble that she ought to have a backup sitter (which she should have, of course). The aide told the ADON that She should have a backup aide. LOL
  10. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from chuck1234
    Everybody hates it, but nobody can do anything about it!
    Chuck, have you read the posts before yours? People can and have fought it and wrought improvement. umpiron:
  11. by   canoehead
    Quote from chuck1234
    "Defeatist attitude" and "incorrect."
    So...what can you do about it!
    Don't answer the phone.

    Answer the phone and tell them you just had a couple glasses of wine.

    Ask them if any of the supervisors/managers have been mandated yet, if not, it's not a true crisis.
  12. by   kat911
    In our hospital we use mandatory OT only in weather emergencies, ice storms hit us usually once a year. Much of our staff live out of town. No one leave thier work station until the unit is staffed for the next shift. If enough don't make it in to work (we pick up staff in town) staff must stay to care for the patients. Usually we have people voulunteer to stay. Only other mandatory OT is when no RN shows up on a unit and we have no one to send to cover that unit and no one will come in to work. If off going RN leaves she will have to deal with abandonment issue/peer review. Th:stone is happens very rarely.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from jimthorp
    Hogan took care of this for me.
    Me too.

    steph

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