Mandatory CNA!!!!

  1. Ok Im sure quite a few new recruits and some seasoned nurses(I like that!!!)...had to take mandatory classes to become a CNA just to be considered in the nursing programs at several colleges.Question of the day is ...WHY?..Why is it mandatory to have your CNAI/CNAII just to apply for nursing school?
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  2. 36 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Many individuals are graduating from modern nursing programs, while still sorely lacking in very basic nursing skills such as toileting, bed baths, transfers, perineal care, ADL assistance, etc. In addition, many new nurses are unreasonably disgusted and dismayed at the mere thought, smell, and sight of bodily substances such as feces, urine, sputum, saliva, blood, and sweat. Some of these people were seriously under the impression that they didn't have to deal with the "dirty stuff."

    While not necessary, I tend to think that earning a CNA certification is a good prerequisite for nursing school, because it exposes the student to basic skills that should be fundamental. In addition, it exposes students to the "dirty stuff," hopefully enabling them to feel more comfortable around it later on down the line.

    There's nothing worse than a nurse who believes (s)he is too good to empty a urine bag.
  4. by   not now
    I'm gonna guess that it saves time. If the entire class already knows how to make an occupied bed, use bedpan, help feed a patient, ect then less time is needed review these skills. Instead of two days of bed making (my school) it's one or maybe a half day which allots more time to skills not taught in CNA school.
  5. by   DutchgirlRN
    I don't think I would have become a nurse if I had to be a CNA first. I don't mind cleaning up a patient or emptying foleys etc but to do it all day every day that I worked I honestly don't think I could have done it not to mention breaking my back with lifting. I really respect CNA's and think they are under appreciated. The money issue doesn't bother me because I know what it cost me in time and money to go thru nursing school.

    I know nurses who were CNA's, and those who weren't, prior to becoming a nurse. I honestly can't say one is better than the other. You've either got it in you to be a good nurse or not. IMHO
  6. by   LoraLou
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    I don't think I would have become a nurse if I had to be a CNA first. I don't mind cleaning up a patient or emptying foleys etc but to do it all day every day that I worked I honestly don't think I could have done it not to mention breaking my back with lifting. I really respect CNA's and think they are under appreciated. The money issue doesn't bother me because I know what it cost me in time and money to go thru nursing school.

    I know nurses who were CNA's, and those who weren't, prior to becoming a nurse. I honestly can't say one is better than the other. You've either got it in you to be a good nurse or not. IMHO
    You don't have to work as a CNA, just take the CNA classes.
  7. by   casi
    I think it's just another way to weed out the applicants. The school I got into that requires applicants be a CNA and have so many hours paid experience in Health Care. They got over 500 applicants for 110 seats. I can't help but wonder how many they would have gotten if they didn't require this.
  8. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from LoraLou
    You don't have to work as a CNA, just take the CNA classes.
    What would be the point in that? Not ever working as a CNA? Learning what you'll learn in nursing school?
  9. by   SharonH, RN
    This is a way for colleges and schools of nursing to do less work without reducing tuition cost. By requiring the recruits to come to school with basic skills that used to be their responsibility to teach, they do less all the while their tuition remains the same or continues to rise.
  10. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from casi
    I think it's just another way to weed out the applicants. The school I got into that requires applicants be a CNA and have so many hours paid experience in Health Care. They got over 500 applicants for 110 seats. I can't help but wonder how many they would have gotten if they didn't require this.
    That's ridiculous.
  11. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    That's ridiculous.
    Why? Just curious...
  12. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    Why? Just curious...

    I don't think it's fair to require someone to have had a job in healthcare to become a nurse. What about traditional students who are attempting to enter right after high school? What if it is too difficult for someone to work and go to school? This requirement forces them to quit school for a period of time to get a certification and acquire the necessary work experience which puts an additional burden of time and money on the student. If their program is not enough to successfully prepare someone to become a nurse without placing all these upfront requirements for work and certification then they might need to re-evaluate their program.
  13. by   misswhitney
    A school near me does not require it but does give you 20 extra points if you have it and 5 points for every year you spent in the health care field up to 5 years...
  14. by   rnmomtobe2010
    Quote from LoraLou
    You don't have to work as a CNA, just take the CNA classes.
    One of the schools here that I wanted to attend has a mandatory policy where you have to work at least 20 hours a week as a cna. The school I am currently attending, if you want to be excused form 6 credit hours of nursing classes, then you have to show proof of current cna employment.

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