Mandatory CNA!!!! - page 3

Ok Im sure quite a few new recruits and some seasoned nurses(I like that!!!)...had to take mandatory classes to become a CNA just to be considered in the nursing programs at several colleges.Question... Read More

  1. by   Mexarican
    Nope not at all. It depends on how quickly you pick things up. Healthcare experience helps but it doesn't by any means make you or break you nor will you be the tops in the class because of it. If you have it, great, if you don't, great! Sometimes its best to approach a setting having never seen any of it before and without any preconceptions on how things are done that whay you don't have "old ways" of doing things getting in your way.

    Mex
  2. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from henryswife
    So do you think someone who has healthcare experience like cna,lpn or even a cma can grasp thier duties in a medical setting better than someone who doesnt have a clue about working in the medical field:uhoh21:....I mean I really would like to know what you guys think about this!
    Experience will certainly not hurt you, but lack of healthcare experience won't prevent you from doing well in nursing school. Much of it depends on your ability to pick things up quickly, adapt to new situations, your intelligence, and perhaps most important, your willingness to learn. As a matter of fact, one girl in my class got thrown out of NS in her last semester. She had been a CNA for years, got cocky because she thought she magically acquired nursing knowledge through osmosis, and almost killed a patient. (it involved trach care...)

    We had several people in our class that had no prior healthcare experience and most of them graduated and passed their boards.
  3. by   Lovely_RN
    I agree Witchy.

    We also had plenty of former CNAs who just wouldn't let it go!

    I think in some cases a blank slate is better to work with then trying to erase years of conditioning. Some of the CNAs were so stubborn about looking at things from a nursing perspective vs a CNA one that it was maddening.



    Quote from WitchyRN
    Experience will certainly not hurt you, but lack of healthcare experience won't prevent you from doing well in nursing school. Much of it depends on your ability to pick things up quickly, adapt to new situations, your intelligence, and perhaps most important, your willingness to learn. As a matter of fact, one girl in my class got thrown out of NS in her last semester. She had been a CNA for years, got cocky because she thought she magically acquired nursing knowledge through osmosis, and almost killed a patient. (it involved trach care...)

    We had several people in our class that had no prior healthcare experience and most of them graduated and passed their boards.
  4. by   RNsRWe
    I know I spoke about this on a similar thread, but it's old and buried now, so I'll offer my two cents again

    While I don't believe having CNA training prior to entering nursing school will make you a better nurse, it WILL save the instructor time in teaching those basic patient care skills in Fundamentals. CNA training was NOT a prerequisite for my alma mater, but looking back, I kinda wish it had been.

    We spent too much time, in my opinion, teaching us how to make beds, how to give baths, take vital signs properly. ALOT of this was taught in video format, outside the classroom, requiring us to spend gobs of time on stuff that might have been learned in a set of CNA classes. We all learned it, of course, but when I think of the time we had to squeeze in other things.....it could have been better.

    I don't believe it's necessary to be employed as a CNA prior to nursing school. Just have the training, ON ACTUAL PATIENTS. This would honestly weed out those who puked at the sight of puke, and those who could not clean a patient's incontinent stools without heaving. I recall one student who dropped out of Fundamentals because he couldn't stand the SMELL of the elderly and rather ill patients--seriously. This could have been a seat available to a student who did NOT gag at the smell. Didn't know you had to pull patients up in the beds, roll them over, and haul them around in general? Good time to find out! And when you are assigned patients AS a nursing student, you'll be more confident in helping to ambulate that patient, and move them. Too much time spent in Fundamentals learning how to do the basics.

    If it saves schools time in teaching, and saves money because of the same, great. It costs the students money in the course, but in light of what school's gonna cost anyway....that's fine by me. If it keeps students who should NOT be taking up space out of Nursing 101, good.
  5. by   Mexarican
    the ability to deal with horrendous smells is acquired. If your born with it then great but it can be acquired IF and only IF the person wants to push through it. Many a great nurses had a vommiting episodes and worked through it. Just cause you can't stomach it at first doesn't condemn you to it being that way forever if you don't want it to.

    Mex
  6. by   spydercadet
    Hey All,Long time since I checked in last, it's good to be back!!! Want to know what I think, I'd love to believe it was for experience or time or any of the more idealistic reasons I can think of, but I believe it all comes down to money. One of the main reasons we have a nursing shortage is because of the lack of open seats for the nursing courses, and why is that, because of the limited number of MSN's who want to teach. So, what do schools do, have their nursing students become CNA's first, that only requires a RN with two years experience and a certification course to teach the program, in most states anyway. So who costs more to teach? I'm thinking the MSN and them I'm thinking the schools just don't want to put out that money on "just teaching the basics." I personally think this isn't a very good reason, or idea for that matter. When I taught the CNA course, I had students from those who just wanted to take the CNA course and go no further to those who were planning on going for their BSN. Some of my students lacked basic educational skills and in no way were able to keep up with those who had plans of attending nursing school soon or had already completed their prerequisites.However, until we no longer use money, this is the way it will go. And, if some of the Nursing Boards get their way, we will need to hire Nurses with their PhD's to teach Nursing - if you think there is a shortage now, what will happen then?
  7. by   ZippyGBR
    Quote from henryswife
    Ok Im sure quite a few new recruits and some seasoned nurses(I like that!!!)...had to take mandatory classes to become a CNA just to be considered in the nursing programs at several colleges.Question of the day is ...WHY?..Why is it mandatory to have your CNAI/CNAII just to apply for nursing school?
    why reinvent the wheel ? CNA competencies are a good way of ensuring peopel have a levle of basic nursing skill. here in rightpondia peopel working as HCAs with level3 NVQ can get acccreditation of prior learningfor quite a lot of the outcomes in the first year of a pre-registration programme.
  8. by   Balder_LPN
    Plus, it seems to me that there are almost always 1 or 2 in a CNA class who are pursuing nursing as a career that decide this isnt for them. Saves themselves from investing in a bunch of school and saves a slot in NURS101 for someone who is more sure of their career path.
  9. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from Balder
    Plus, it seems to me that there are almost always 1 or 2 in a CNA class who are pursuing nursing as a career that decide this isnt for them. Saves themselves from investing in a bunch of school and saves a slot in NURS101 for someone who is more sure of their career path.

    Nursing students quit nursing school during all phases of the program. Either you can be a nurse or you can't. If someone wants to try by becoming a CNA first then that's probably a good move for them but it shouldn't be forced on everyone.
  10. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    Nursing students quit nursing school during all phases of the program. Either you can be a nurse or you can't. If someone wants to try by becoming a CNA first then that's probably a good move for them but it shouldn't be forced on everyone.
    Exactly, considering not all of us go into med/surg out of school. everyone is different and has different needs.
  11. by   CaLLaCoDe
    I have no desire to see future nurses having to take CNA coursework as a prerequisite. The burden of required prenursing school courses is too great already!

    On the other hand, I can personally recommend it. I gained a lot from having taking the coursework for CNA and having been a CNA for x number of years.

    Now that our hospital will be lowering the patient to nurse ratio I can honestly say I am thankful for having been a CNA in order to handle situations by myself rather than call on a CNA who may have upwards of 15 patients.

    Our hospital hires RN students to be care partners without having completed coursework for CNA. Most of these students are inadequate, having to be taught skills, ie emptying colostomy bags, removing urine from foley tubing for a lab study and peri care. A CNA's skillset cannot be fully covered during one semester of nursing school in my opinion.
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Dec 27, '07

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