Male vs. Female - page 4

male vs. female......i don't see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. i have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male... Read More

  1. by   tiredfeetED
    In the ED...I have put in a handful of foleys in women..only be its cause you need a woman present and most of the time the women present are RNs. I myself am not comfortable putting one in a A & O women..same goes for IM shots..I take a female in with me..
    I think the last time i did a foley or a in-out was when a nurse floated and could not put it in. I guess in the ED, the women cath the women. And by the way the other RNs can place a foley faster than it takes me to put on my sterile gloves!
  2. by   Rustyhammer
    I had no idea that this would even be an issue.
    A pt is a pt and if they need a foley and you are the nurse then you should insert it.
    If you handle yourself professionaly there shouldn't be a problem.
    Who would ever think this is a turn-on anyway?
    This is the type of thing that still keeps men and women who are nurses seperated.
    -Russell
  3. by   Nurse Ratched
    I don't understand why we continue to perpetrate this myth that men are animals ready to pounce on the first exposed female they see.

    Seems to me that we need to impress upon people the professionalism that comes with being a nurse. If the patient brings it up, fine, but I would tend to go about my business like it was the most natural thing in the world (because it is - at work, I am an asexual being - that's the LAST thing I'm thinking about lol.)

    OTOH, I am not a guy, and I wouldn't necessarily fault a guy who wanted to avoid leaving an opening for someone to accuse him of impropriety. But if someone is determined to lie, then they can do that without being in a "compromising position." One male patient (psych floor - alcoholic) alleged that a female nurse took his gold card in exchange for, um, non-traditional nursing services. Alleged it happened during the admission process (naturally, the supposed credit card was not accounted for.) It was ridiculous on its face (besides that she didn't do it, there was no way the guy had a gold card) but nonetheless, had to be "investigated" by risk management.
  4. by   Tweety
    Rustyhammer says: If you handle yourself professionaly there shouldn't be a problem.

    Nurse Ratched says: I don't understand why we continue to perpetrate this myth that men are animals ready to pounce on the first exposed female they see.


    That of course is the ideal. The reality is that occasionally, fortunately not to freqently male nurses are the target of unfair accusations. Happened to a male nurses aide where I worked. A physcho broad from hell accussed him of molestation while taking her off a bedban.

    We all know how to put in foleys, we all know that what should be.

    I'm still not doing it without a female witness at my side, thus I'm going to ask a female to do it. Sorry.

  5. by   Agnus
    It is interesting that the question of males cathing females comes up more often than the reverse.

    Some times it is a problem or a risk. Like when you are falsely accused.

    I have worked with men who routinely trade off this task. In return they cath female nurses' male patients. Very appropriate if you ask me.

    However, I don't think you need to trade off when it is not realistic. I don't think you need to live in fear of litigation over cathing a female. I think if you are professional about it. Most of the time you will be safe. Trouble is there is a very real danger that at some point you could wind up in court or some such over this issue. It is much more likely a male nurse will be accused than a female.
  6. by   teeituptom
    Thank you Agnus

    I have dealt with lawyers before

    and I fear what they represent

    which is misery

    no such thing as a good lawyer who is still breathing
  7. by   Calfax
    Quote from teeituptom
    Thank you Agnus

    I have dealt with lawyers before

    and I fear what they represent

    which is misery

    no such thing as a good lawyer who is still breathing
    What do you call 1000 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean?

    A good start!

    But what do you call a nurse-attorney?

    Sue.

    What if he's a guy?

    Rich.

    With no arms or legs?

    Bob.

    At the bottom of the ocean?

    Spongebob.

    ok, ok, ok, ok....I'll stop now.

    What about cathing kids? Parents present or not? Also do you anchor foleys with K-loks or not?
  8. by   teeituptom
    deep down attorneys are really decent





    6 feet down under
  9. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Calfax
    With no arms or legs?
    Bob.

    At the bottom of the ocean?
    Spongebob.
    Hahahahahahaha!

    Couple of good ones there.
  10. by   Nursewise
    Quote from alk3rainbow
    thats ok I'm a female in a rural area and I had a resident throw an absolute temper tantrum hitting people, screaming, and carrying on like crazy because he did not want a female showering him. Of course in nursing homes everyone seems to freak out around shower time.
    Hmmm. In all fairness, though, I wonder how much of carrying on a female resident would have to do in the reverse situation. Not much, You can be sure.

    Nursewise
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Russell - I don't think of this as a situation where someone gets "turned on". I think of it as a privacy issue, as I said. My grandmother, now in a nursing home, was mortified by having a foley placed and it did not matter WHO placed it. It was an embarrassing procedure for her.

    I guess my point, as I stated before, is patient comfort. I'm not worrying about a lawsuit, I'm worried about the "shyness" factor in my patient. I've never had anyone refuse my inserting a f/c but I have had some patients very embarrassed. Come on, we all say we don't want to end up in a nursing home having someone wipe our tushes and then we say patients shouldn't care about who places a foley and about having a foley placed period? Especially for women, due to their anatomy, this is not a fun experience. My husband refused one when he had his knee surgery.

    I completely understand Tom and Tweety's point though . . . even though I've not come across such a patient. CYA . . .

    steph
  12. by   nursemouse
    Had the experience of a very professional, intelligent male nurse where I worked being propositioned by a patient. I was charge, and he came out to the station, reported it, documented it, and asked courteously to be removed from the case, which I did. Then the patient called me into the room and claimed that HE had propositioned HER! Even more interesting: after making the accusation, she asked if he could come back and be her nurse again.
    (BTW: this shouldn't matter, but she was 90 years old...)
  13. by   TweetiePieRN
    In the dept I work at the hospital....THERE ARE NO MALE RNS! So if a male patient were to need a catheter...does that mean we are supposed to find a male to perform the catheterization...Does a male housekeeper count? Yes, our society is litigious, but to expect a male to cath a male...how is my dept expected to handle this? Just a thought.

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