Male vs. Female - page 3

male vs. female......i don't see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. i have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male... Read More

  1. by   Darchild77
    Quote from wannaBEanRN
    But I'll bet those same idiot women would let a GUY be their doctor. Unreal!
    Actually, I would not have a male nurse care for me, and chose not to have a male doctor either. I don't think that makes me an idiot, just a little uncomfortable around men(child hood experience) and self concious. I don't think it's fair to say that these women are idiots when you don't know where they are coming from.
  2. by   orrnlori
    Actually, when I had my vag-hys I had a male surgeon but as I was waiting to be taken to the OR I had two male residents come up to me and introduce themselves. I said "Nice to meet you but you aren't going to be in my room, you aren't helping with my surgery." They were a little shocked and I'm sure not very happy with me, they too are professionals. It didn't matter to me, I wasn't having more than the surgeon in the room with the nurses I hand picked from the staff. The surgeon understood and my nurses understood.

    I have no problem with male nurses, as a matter of fact, I love the ones I work with. I help with their caths and they help me lift heavy patients. We work together very well. If a male patient didn't want me to do a cath, I wouldn't get upset. I has nothing to do with how I perceive myself as a professional. It has everything to do with making the patient comfortable.
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    I agree with those who have said the point is patient comfort.

    Generalizing about people who are uncomfortable with having their most private zone, so to speak, uncovered and opened up for all to see and then having a tube shoved up their urethra and urine emptied in to a bag is a bit callous. I would never call such a person an idiot.

    A cath in and of itself is an embarrassing and uncomfortable procedure. That someone requests a person of the same sex to do it is not an unreasonable request and in my opinion has little to do with the fear of anything sexual.

    We are supposed to be our patient's advocate. If they request someone else, please don't take it personally.

    I've never had anyone request someone else but I did have a situation where my patient was a teenage boy who was a friend of my son and our family. He needed a cath desperately due to pain and I quickly asked another female RN to do it just to protect his privacy. He had no problem with the female nurse cathing him as he just wanted the pain to stop.

    The point is the patient.

    steph
  4. by   casper1
    In my facility if a patient request that a female insert the foley, we will respect her wishes and a female nurse will do the job. AS a general rule male nurses do insert foleys on female patients they also give bed baths.
    If you do ask a female nurse to help you out with one of your assigned patients Please remember your taking time away from her scheduled duties. IM sure she would appreciate it if you would offer to help her.
  5. by   mrdoc2005
    Quote from bukko
    You guys who are reluctant to catheterize women -- how do you handle peri care and bathing females?
    Most of the time I have no problems. However, I just try to read the person. If I get that uneasy feeling about her than I ask another student (female) to help me.

    I did work as a CNA at the local nursing home. Most of the ladys (residents) had no problem with me doing their care. Most would even say "you have to learn somewhere". On the flip side we had a blind male resident who would not let a male CNA help him. He thought that no man should help him. Not a sex or flurt thing he just did not want a male CNA. I think he thought that all male nurses are gay and was a homophob.
  6. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from carlls
    male vs. female……i don’t see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. i have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male pt.’s. i will always see if a female coworker will perform this procedure on my female pt’s. i am about to graduate in may with my adn. i just want to get the general census about this.
    what century are you from? it doesn't matter what sex is performing the catheter procedure!! haven't you learned this in nursing school?
  7. by   teeituptom
    Yes It does matter Tweetie

    Over the decades I have seen many guys get in trouble for it, one was just last year.

    It isnt worth the risk. get a female to do it for you

    This guy last yr lost his license

    not worth the risk

    besides erring on the side of pt comfort never hurts in the least anyway.
  8. by   Rocknurse
    In my 13 years as a nurse, I have never put a catheter in a male patient. In England it's not allowed for a female nurse to put a cath in a male patient, and vice versa. To be honest, if I was told I had to do it I would feel extremely uncomfortable. That is my personal feeling and I am dreading the day I will have to do it. If I possibly can I would ask a male nurse to do it for me, and I would do his female patient. I guess it's another culture difference, but I really can't see myself doing it. The thought makes me feel icky. It's not really anything to do with nursing issues, but it's more on a personal level with me. I certainly wouldn't allow a male nurse to catheterise me. I just think it's wrong to have to handle someone's genitals of the opposite sex. Ugh...some people have issues with sputum, faeces whatever. I guess this is mine.
  9. by   karenG
    Quote from Rocknurse
    In my 13 years as a nurse, I have never put a catheter in a male patient. In England it's not allowed for a female nurse to put a cath in a male patient, and vice versa. To be honest, if I was told I had to do it I would feel extremely uncomfortable. That is my personal feeling and I am dreading the day I will have to do it. If I possibly can I would ask a male nurse to do it for me, and I would do his female patient. I guess it's another culture difference, but I really can't see myself doing it. The thought makes me feel icky. It's not really anything to do with nursing issues, but it's more on a personal level with me. I certainly wouldn't allow a male nurse to catheterise me. I just think it's wrong to have to handle someone's genitals of the opposite sex. Ugh...some people have issues with sputum, faeces whatever. I guess this is mine.

    thats not strictly true- females do cath male patients over here. male nurses tend not to cath women for the reasons stated earlier by Tweety.


    Karen
  10. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from karenG
    thats not strictly true- females do cath male patients over here. male nurses tend not to cath women for the reasons stated earlier by Tweety.


    Karen
    Must just have been the hospitals I worked in then. I must say I've never heard of it happening in England.
  11. by   Speculating
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CarllS
    Male vs. Female......I don't see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. I have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male pt.'s. I will always see if a female coworker will perform this procedure on my female pt's. I am about to graduate in May with my ADN. I just want to get the general census about this.


    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    What century are you from? It doesn't matter what sex is performing the catheter procedure!! Haven't you learned this in nursing school?

    TweetiePieRN is 100% on the money. We live in a different century and society. A guy putting a Foley in a guy, and a female catheterizing a female have just the same chance of being sued as someone of the opposite sex putting a catheter in a pt. So if you're going to use lawsuit as a reason, you technically should have someone of the opposite sex with you whenever you do any catheterizing.
  12. by   ~Anne~
    Quote from bukko
    I had no idea this was a problem for so many male nurses. I have no problems (except for that "finding the spot" issue) with cathing females. If it's someone A&O, I always ask if they'd prefer a female nurse. And I usually have a female nurse or CNA present, not so much for self-protection as to provide a little extra, ummmm, "spread."
    What worries me more is my fellow nurses. If I'm always asking them to do an unpleasant job, they're going to peg me as a work-shirker. There are cultural differences in the approach to doing this, though. One of the first times I cathed a female patient at my current hospital, the Filipina nurses with me were embarrassed. There is more of a sex-based division of labor in their country.
    You guys who are reluctant to catheterize women -- how do you handle peri care and bathing females?
    I have to agree that if another nurse is always asking someone to do things for them whether male or female its usually because they just do not want to do it... A nurse is a nurse ...no matter waht sex , and should be able to perform every bit of nursing care including cathing a female pt.. Besides how are you going to get the experience when you DO have to cath a female in an emergency? As for "finding the spot"...let me tell you, even us female nurses cannot always find it...so dont feel bad!...it just takes practice...and how can you get it if you never do it. Good Luck!
  13. by   steel magnolia
    I am female and have done both, but I have often asked a male nurse to do the cath on a male if I sense he may be uncomfortable. The bottom line has a lot to do w pt comfort, and the raport you have established with the pt. Sometimes I thought a male would be uncomfortable w me doing their cath and they laugh and say they trust me, or it doesn't bother them, etc... But even if I did have a good rapport with a pt, it wouldn't upset me in the least if they asked for a male nurse. And if there were no male nurses, I would try to find a male md/resident if possible.

    I would have no problem cathing a female pt for a male co-worker, as teeituptom said (I think it was him on another page) it is called teamwork! I would never question it as a male nurse trying to get out of their work!

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