Male nursing students can do assessments on the women? - page 3

( sorry the heading ment to say CANT do not CAN do) Hello, this is my first post so ill introduce myself. Im a 25/m ER/Trauma phlebotomist and I will be entering nursing school this fall ( after a 2... Read More

  1. by   oso
    I can truely appreciate your situation and questions. I have worked in a busy ER for six years and will grasduate in just 12 weeks (Woo Hoo). I have found that in all areas I have spent time, that being a male is not a problem. In fact I had one woman request me during my OB rotation. What ever happens don't let what others tell you hold you back. It will all be fine. Just a side note, there is only 5 males out of 80 students in my class, and I have found that my classmates have gone out of their way to make us comfortable, even during assessments.
  2. by   Larry in Florida
    I recently did clinicals in a large hospital in Georgia and had two women and two men. No problem, keep it professional and always, always have a a female assistant. Remember there are some strange people out there so protect yourself.
    Quote from oso
    I can truely appreciate your situation and questions. I have worked in a busy ER for six years and will grasduate in just 12 weeks (Woo Hoo). I have found that in all areas I have spent time, that being a male is not a problem. In fact I had one woman request me during my OB rotation. What ever happens don't let what others tell you hold you back. It will all be fine. Just a side note, there is only 5 males out of 80 students in my class, and I have found that my classmates have gone out of their way to make us comfortable, even during assessments.
  3. by   marilynmom
    PLease do not be discourage. Out of 75 in my class over 10 are males. We are doing our OB rotation right now and the 2 males in my group (clinical group of 6) I have walked into a room and they are holding the laboring womens legs helping her push! SO they definatly get just as much experience as the female OB students. We have not had one single mom say no to them doing assessments, etc.

    Maybe it depends on the school and your clinical instructors? I know our male students have had not had any of those problems at all. During physical assessment lab it just depends on the girl, most of the guys seemed to team up together to do assessment on each other (their own choice), but it was just their choice, I guess they felt more comfortable that way?
  4. by   Tiwi
    I guess the concern is patient values, and maintaining "cultural safety". This applies equally to female nurses as it does to male. Where I work, it is important to be aware of indigenous Australian ppls values. There is "men's business" and "women's business" and never ever the twain should meet. However particularly male Aboriginals have to receive care from female nurses and this causes much distress.

    Yet there are indigenous ppl who are used to our health system who are more accepting of nurses of the opposite sex providing care and assessment.

    This principle would also apply to any other cultural group, including whichever one we are a member of. So it depends on the patient as to what they consent to. And hopefully I have demonstrated the point that female nurses can often
    be in similar situations.
    Last edit by Tiwi on Feb 16, '07 : Reason: I missed the point!
  5. by   PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    I had something like this happen to me the other day ironically enough. I got a STAT call to the L&D floor to draw a moms H&H level as she was apparently bleeding chronically. Anyways, when i get in the room there were 2 female RN'S 2 male RN'S and a female OB doc in the room. The p.t. had soaked here gown in blood so they were in the process of removing her gown and she was basically nude at this point. As soon as one of the female RN's started to take her
    clothes off of her in the bed the OB doc told me to get out of the room ( remember the other 2 male RN's are still in the room) i asked her "didnt you just order a STAT H&H?" The doc said " Yes, but i dont want you in here as we are changing her, Leave." I was more then insulted by this as there were two other men nurses in there that were allowed to remain during her changing. Either the doc thinks so little of the lab that even though she ORDERED this be done right away she would rather her labs wait while she get a gown on or she just was not thinking ( i find that hard to believe). I find this hypocritical as the other 2 men were allowed to stay in there so im not sure what to think of this. I love health care even though im just a Phleb i really do enjoy waking up everyday to go to work,but im becoming discourage because i think as a guy in the nursing field im going to be facing up hill battles with everyone all the time. It doesn’t help that i look 15 years old either its hard to be taken seriously haha
  6. by   whitecap1
    I think it is all about your attitude. If you go into a patient's room like you know what you are doing, and that it is totally professional...you should be okay. There are always going to be a few female patients that prefer a female, but the majority will be okay with it. (keep in mind that the patients are already hesitant to let a student do anything to them and being a male will only make it worse.) But if you maintain a very professional attitude it will take you a lot farther. Most of the post partum patients are so used to having nurses, doctors, and students in and out of their rooms looking at their private areas that they soon won't care what gender you are. Good luck in nursing school!!!
  7. by   blueheaven
    Back in 1975 we had 8 male nurses in my class and they did everything the female nursing students did (including OB rotation).
  8. by   withasmilelpn
    I think it's discrimination and should not be tolerated. I had a male CNA assist a LOL to the bathroom. When he returned to help her off, the son appeared and objected. He wanted the other female cna to stop passing out trays and help or me to stop doing my meds. I explained to him nicely that we could try to accomodate her if needed but she would have to wait. Then I asked her if she minded having a male cna. She said no, end of story.
  9. by   DeLana_RN
    When my husband was in nursing school (ADN), he had no problems with this, including his OB rotation. Now, in practice, he and his female coworkers agree to help each other out - he will do the male Foleys, the women the female Foleys. Likewise, he will never be alone with a female patient in any situation (e.g, bedbath - he works in ICU) where accusations could be made.

    This may sound paranoid - but a male nurse in another ICU was recently accused of sodomizing (!) a female patient, who was sedated and apparently having hallucinations* (the case was dismissed, but not without causing the nurse a lot of trouble - and legal expense - and putting all other male nurses on notice... ) Male doctors always have a female present in certain situations, and male nurses would be wise to keep that in mind.

    Not trying to scare you, I encourage you to go into nursing, just be wise.

    DeLana

    *This was in an ICU, pt on a vent, with female staff nearby. The pt's family made the accusations based on what pt had told them.
  10. by   ICUPM
    You hit the nail on the head, as did NREMT-P/RN. It's not the reality that will get you ... the accusation can destroy you. Truth has nothing to do with it. I am male, I've completed my OB rotations with full particiation and no problems. The only Foley's I've ever started have been on females. (And to the very early poster ... no child birth is not arousing)

    I was quaking in my boots going into OB clinicals but mmy instructor was very supportive. It worked out fine.

    I have been teaming up with other students during clinicals in order to get the morning care stuff out of the way. My plan is to talk to the staff on whatever unit I first start working on to see if some of the RN's would do the same. I'll just try never to get myself into a situation where it's my word against a female patient. I'll always try to have a witness around. I also run rescue with a local ambulance squad. We have specific protocols we have to follow that have been designed to protect male crews against accusations from female patients. The reverse accusations are basiclaly unheard of.

    I hear everyone's point on all the "we're all equal here" stuff but I'm not taking the bait. Maybe I'm just an old school guy, but I have to believe that a male would have a much more difficult time in front of a jury and would be much more likely dismissed from his job than would a female being accused of the same thing. It seems to me that we're held under much more suspicion and scrutiny in these matters. That's not a value judgement - just an observation.

    Even with all that said - I'm still taking the NCLEX this summer and heading for the ICU. I think it's a manageable risk.
  11. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from phlebotomist_to_rn
    so basically when im a nurse anytime i have to examine a females breasts or genitals for any reason i need to have a female nurse with me in the room at all time? does this work the other way around as well? or just with the male nurses?
    for one thing, it is rare that a nurse (of either genders) has to closely examine breasts, barring them being part of the presenting dx or being on postpartum. if they are part of a dx, it is usually due to a surgical issue and there are dressings there, or they have a fungating wound/carcinoma, and the patient has probably had them examined by several male hcwers before you. the preferences would be known.

    as a note, barring tx in military hospitals, everytime a male md has done any breast/pap exam on me, he has always had a female nurse presence, even though i have said that it is unnecessary.i have had two breast masses removed, and some lymph node needle biopsies, and nothing was ever even examined without a female present.

    i offer to have a male nurse assist with personal exams on male patients, but most of them voice that they would be more uncomfortable with a male nurse presence than anything. but quite bluntly, unless one is dealing with a pt that is seriously incapacitated, quite elderly and incontinent, or has a dx related directly related to the genitals, the nurse's contact/exam is limited.
  12. by   Janus Rising
    I'm a second year student and have yet to be told by anyone that I can't assist or view something. My first day in OB I assisted with a vaginal birth. It's just a given that as male nursing students (in my program at least) get to experience everything.
  13. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from Janus Rising
    It's just a given that as male nursing students (in my program at least) get to experience everything.
    Which is as it should be.

    The guys in my class got to see & do everything too and I'm glad. I have said this before, as a female who has been a patient, I do not care whether you are a man, woman, or whatever else as long as you care and know what you are doing. Some of the best nurses I have ever worked with were men. I don't remember them ever having a female chaperone for foleys, suppositories, or anything else, and none of them ever had problems. I certainly never got anyone to come c me for the millions of foleys and suppositories I've put in my male patients. I think most people of both sexes realize that we are just doing a job & we don't get our thrills out of it.

    All that said, I do think that if you wanted a chaperone (regardless of your gender) it would a very smart thing. In this day & age people will sue if you even look at them funny. I personally have never found it necessary for myself (much less now that I do mother/baby & by definition all I see is women) but I could very much understand if someone else wanted to.

    Welcoming as many caring men into this profession as will join!!

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