Male nursing students can do assessments on the women? - page 2

( sorry the heading ment to say CANT do not CAN do) Hello, this is my first post so ill introduce myself. Im a 25/m ER/Trauma phlebotomist and I will be entering nursing school this fall ( after a 2... Read More

  1. by   PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    so basically when im a nurse anytime i have to examine a females breasts or genitals for any reason i need to have a female nurse with me in the room at all time? does this work the other way around as well? or just with the male nurses?
  2. by   chuck1234
    Quote from phlebotomist_to_rn
    so basically when im a nurse anytime i have to examine a females breasts or genitals for any reason i need to have a female nurse with me in the room at all time? does this work the other way around as well? or just with the male nurses?
    female nurses do not need male co-workers to be around...only when you are a male nurses, well.... just to play it safe. you just want to eliminate the "she says and he says situation." be honest with you, if my female patient is alert, even a suppository thing, i will make sure a female pca or pct is around...and make sure this pca or pct has a good character!
  3. by   NicoleRN07
    I work in the ER and work with several male nurses, and in general, I have not seen any issues with the female patients and male nurses. When doing EKG's, foley's,etc, the male nurse always asks a female nurse or tech to assist, just for the added comfort of the situation. It wouldn't bother me to have a male nurse, and it just doesn't seem to be an issue. Matter of fact, when I was in labor with my son, I had 2 male nursing students have the opportunity of viewing a birth (they were great by the way, lots of support and encouragement to me as well as my husband)!!

    DON'T LET THIS ISSUE DISCOURAGE YOU......WE NEED MORE MALES IN THIS PROFESSION!!
  4. by   chuck1234
    Quote from NicoleRN07
    I work in the ER and work with several male nurses, and in general, I have not seen any issues with the female patients and male nurses. When doing EKG's, foley's,etc, the male nurse always asks a female nurse or tech to assist, just for the added comfort of the situation. It wouldn't bother me to have a male nurse, and it just doesn't seem to be an issue. Matter of fact, when I was in labor with my son, I had 2 male nursing students have the opportunity of viewing a birth (they were great by the way, lots of support and encouragement to me as well as my husband)!!

    DON'T LET THIS ISSUE DISCOURAGE YOU......WE NEED MORE MALES IN THIS PROFESSION!!
    I hope everybody thinks like you...so....open-minded!!!
    However, up here in New York, as I still remember there was a male nurse who was accused of fondling a female patient...this male nurse was suspended...until the investigation was completed. At the end, he was not found guilty. I am totally agree with you, and as you stated "DON'T LET THIS ISSUE DISCOURAGE YOU." But somehow you just don't want to be accused...and I hope you can understand it.
  5. by   JB28930
    i am currently in my third semester in nursing school. i start ob clinicals later this semester and have already been warned that i will not be participating in much. anyways, my first semester in school a number of my instructors would not let us (males) take female patients. it is the patients right to refuse a male nurse if they do not feel comfortable, but i do not think its fair for instructors to purposely give males only male patients. as far as assessments go in class, males were not allowed to do any assessments on females. in fact we had to be in completely separate rooms. this did not bother me as much because i can understand how it could be uncomfortable for both sexes examining each other in our underwear with no professional setting. the media and general stigma with this country is that it is a female profession. i have come to realize males are just going to have to deal with whatever is thrown their way and try to look at it as positive as they can untill society accepts males working in nursing as "normal". again male behaviors have raised attention making females very weary and full of distrust hence needing another witness in the room. i am thankful that male nurses are respected by other health care professionals, well at least other nurses .
  6. by   Medic/Nurse
    Hey there Phlebotomist to RN -

    Don't get too concerned, be deliberate and professional and all should be just fine! I think Chuck1234 gives great advice about the "chaperone" thing!

    Personally I would have no problem with a Male Nurse or other provider - as long as they were professional and respectful. Most clinical instructors are pretty adept at facilitation of students getting broad clinical experiences! I hope this is the case with you! Otherwise, talk with your instructor and ask for their assistance. I do respect that patients can decide who is involved in their care - but I think there are many that would allow ANY student to participate in their care if asked. A calm presence along with profound respect is essential.

    I will admit that there seems to be a "double standard" that does exist, men need a woman present while examining women, but a woman can do it all - no need for another to be present! I think this practice should be abandoned.

    I DO NOT THINK IT IS A GOOD PRACTICE TO PROVIDE ANY EXAM/PROCEDURE INVOLVING "INTIMATE" REGIONS TO ANY PATIENT WITHOUT A CHAPERONE. MALE OR FEMALE PATIENT. MALE OR FEMALE PROVIDER! NO EXCEPTIONS!

    It has NOTHING to do with the comfort of the patient - it has EVERYTHING to do with my SAFETY. To think that a "woman" patient would not accuse a woman healthcare provider of "something inappropriate" is just foolish. Add to the intimate nature of nursing and some patients that have mental/personality disorders and you have all the ingredients for a disaster!

    (For the record - I've had patients that show up in the ED for pelvic exams on a disturbingly regular basis. Add that to the freaky ones that insist that someone "examines" their genital/rectal areas, a couple of patients that have insisted on suppository medications, the ones that seek (demand) an enema - and well, I hope you get the point.... I could add other "examples" but I'm sure everyone has a few of their own!)

    All it takes is an ACCUSATION and that alone will leave a lot of ruin. EVEN if the healthcare provider did nothing wrong.

    I ALWAYS take another into a room when doing ANY exam/procedure on ANY patient that is in an "intimate" area. Yes, it does take a bit more time, but MY license is worth it! I have never had a problem, but why invite trouble. I think this practice is the most respectful for the patient AND allows any healthcare provider to practice without restriction!

    EVERYONE benefits!

    PRACTICE SAFE!
  7. by   chuck1234
    Quote from NREMT-P/RN
    Hey there Phlebotomist to RN -

    Don't get too concerned, be deliberate and professional and all should be just fine! I think Chuck1234 gives great advice about the "chaperone" thing!

    Personally I would have no problem with a Male Nurse or other provider - as long as they were professional and respectful. Most clinical instructors are pretty adept at facilitation of students getting broad clinical experiences! I hope this is the case with you! Otherwise, talk with your instructor and ask for their assistance. I do respect that patients can decide who is involved in their care - but I think there are many that would allow ANY student to participate in their care if asked. A calm presence along with profound respect is essential.

    I will admit that there seems to be a "double standard" that does exist, men need a woman present while examining women, but a woman can do it all - no need for another to be present! I think this practice should be abandoned.

    I DO NOT THINK IT IS A GOOD PRACTICE TO PROVIDE ANY EXAM/PROCEDURE INVOLVING "INTIMATE" REGIONS TO ANY PATIENT WITHOUT A CHAPERONE. MALE OR FEMALE PATIENT. MALE OR FEMALE PROVIDER! NO EXCEPTIONS!

    It has NOTHING to do with the comfort of the patient - it has EVERYTHING to do with my SAFETY. To think that a "woman" patient would not accuse a woman healthcare provider of "something inappropriate" is just foolish. Add to the intimate nature of nursing and some patients that have mental/personality disorders and you have all the ingredients for a disaster!

    (For the record - I've had patients that show up in the ED for pelvic exams on a disturbingly regular basis. Add that to the freaky ones that insist that someone "examines" their genital/rectal areas, a couple of patients that have insisted on suppository medications, the ones that seek (demand) an enema - and well, I hope you get the point.... I could add other "examples" but I'm sure everyone has a few of their own!)

    All it takes is an ACCUSATION and that alone will leave a lot of ruin. EVEN if the healthcare provider did nothing wrong.

    I ALWAYS take another into a room when doing ANY exam/procedure on ANY patient that is in an "intimate" area. Yes, it does take a bit more time, but MY license is worth it! I have never had a problem, but why invite trouble. I think this practice is the most respectful for the patient AND allows any healthcare provider to practice without restriction!

    EVERYONE benefits!

    PRACTICE SAFE!
    Very good! I am totally agree with you.
  8. by   Pat_Pat RN
    But then the patient has *two* people staring at their "whosie-whats-its"
    Everyone is always talking about "equality" and all this stuff. Why can't people just get over it, accept us as professionals and move on!

    Pat
  9. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    i personally could care less if my nurse is a male or female... but my husband has a different idea. he does not even want me to have a male doctor..lol it is just so silly. some of the best nurses i have known are male. i would let male students attend the upcoming birth of my daughter but my husband would throw them out.....so silly
    so does it go the other way? what about him having a female md? seems silly to me too.
    ~jen
  10. by   ChocoholicRN
    I am currently doing my OB clinicals rotation and 2 of the ppl in my group are guys. So far, one has seen 2 C/S (in one day, lucky him!!) and no one had a problem with it. The other guy, I think he's more nervous than any of the female patients he's had, so one of us girls usually goes into the room with him to make HIM more comfortable. I would say, wherever you end up working, check what their policy is. If there are other male nurses in that unit, ask them how they handle certain private situations with female patients. Personally I don't care who examines me as long as they know what they're doing. My gyno is a man and he's wonderful. As far as the classroom stuff goes, the best thing to do now is just put up with it. At my school, we always tried to pair guys with guys to practice physical assessments, but I ended up actually getting paired up with the odd guy out. I didn't feel too uncomfortable, but I think the only thing that irked me was that this guy is my friend and is seeing more of me than I would normally let a friend see. Anywho, good luck and study hard!!
  11. by   58flyer
    Quote from NREMT-P/RN
    Hey there Phlebotomist to RN -

    Don't get too concerned, be deliberate and professional and all should be just fine! I think Chuck1234 gives great advice about the "chaperone" thing!

    Personally I would have no problem with a Male Nurse or other provider - as long as they were professional and respectful. Most clinical instructors are pretty adept at facilitation of students getting broad clinical experiences! I hope this is the case with you! Otherwise, talk with your instructor and ask for their assistance. I do respect that patients can decide who is involved in their care - but I think there are many that would allow ANY student to participate in their care if asked. A calm presence along with profound respect is essential.

    I will admit that there seems to be a "double standard" that does exist, men need a woman present while examining women, but a woman can do it all - no need for another to be present! I think this practice should be abandoned.

    I DO NOT THINK IT IS A GOOD PRACTICE TO PROVIDE ANY EXAM/PROCEDURE INVOLVING "INTIMATE" REGIONS TO ANY PATIENT WITHOUT A CHAPERONE. MALE OR FEMALE PATIENT. MALE OR FEMALE PROVIDER! NO EXCEPTIONS!

    It has NOTHING to do with the comfort of the patient - it has EVERYTHING to do with my SAFETY. To think that a "woman" patient would not accuse a woman healthcare provider of "something inappropriate" is just foolish. Add to the intimate nature of nursing and some patients that have mental/personality disorders and you have all the ingredients for a disaster!

    (For the record - I've had patients that show up in the ED for pelvic exams on a disturbingly regular basis. Add that to the freaky ones that insist that someone "examines" their genital/rectal areas, a couple of patients that have insisted on suppository medications, the ones that seek (demand) an enema - and well, I hope you get the point.... I could add other "examples" but I'm sure everyone has a few of their own!)

    All it takes is an ACCUSATION and that alone will leave a lot of ruin. EVEN if the healthcare provider did nothing wrong.

    I ALWAYS take another into a room when doing ANY exam/procedure on ANY patient that is in an "intimate" area. Yes, it does take a bit more time, but MY license is worth it! I have never had a problem, but why invite trouble. I think this practice is the most respectful for the patient AND allows any healthcare provider to practice without restriction!

    EVERYONE benefits!

    PRACTICE SAFE!
    I think you have made some very valid points here. You don't actually say it, but am I correct in assuming that by the term chaperone you mean an assistant of the same sex as the patient?

    We all know that anybody can make an accusation about anybody. Having a second person along will not eliminate that. However the likelihood of such an event is reduced by having the chaperone of the same sex as the patient. A same sex assistant reduces the appearances of impropriety if the provider is of the opposite sex. In a litigious society even female providers should have a same sex (as patient) chaperone to protect themselves. A male patient can make a false claim of impropriety against two women providers just the same as a female patient can make a false claim against two men.

    Also, beyond protecting the provider, if a patient has a person of the same sex for those intimate procedures, the comfort level of the patient is increased. There is a lot to be said for comforting the patient. If the patient feels respected and has his/her emotional concerns provided for, the situation will seem less adversarial. It will keep patient and nurse on the same "side".

    An added benefit would be the increased protection of the patient from bona fide incidents of inappropriate behavior from the few bad apples.

    I THINK IT SHOULD BE A FEDERAL LAW.
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    I could care less...He has had female nurses come do procedures on him.. no big deal ,it is a job. I am a nurse I understand that but he does not..

    Quote from MS._Jen_RN
    So does it go the other way? What about him having a female MD? Seems silly to me too.
    ~Jen
  13. by   chuck1234
    Quote from 58flyer
    I think you have made some very valid points here. You don't actually say it, but am I correct in assuming that by the term chaperone you mean an assistant of the same sex as the patient?

    We all know that anybody can make an accusation about anybody. Having a second person along will not eliminate that. However the likelihood of such an event is reduced by having the chaperone of the same sex as the patient. A same sex assistant reduces the appearances of impropriety if the provider is of the opposite sex. In a litigious society even female providers should have a same sex (as patient) chaperone to protect themselves. A male patient can make a false claim of impropriety against two women providers just the same as a female patient can make a false claim against two men.

    Also, beyond protecting the provider, if a patient has a person of the same sex for those intimate procedures, the comfort level of the patient is increased. There is a lot to be said for comforting the patient. If the patient feels respected and has his/her emotional concerns provided for, the situation will seem less adversarial. It will keep patient and nurse on the same "side".

    An added benefit would be the increased protection of the patient from bona fide incidents of inappropriate behavior from the few bad apples.

    I THINK IT SHOULD BE A FEDERAL LAW.
    I do not know if you had any experience in the health care field...but it is easier for you to understand the situation if you have some.

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