Male L&D nurses - page 6

something i noticed while going through the nursing program was every male nursing students fear and dread of the obstetrics floor. in fact, one man in my class was not even able to participate much... Read More

  1. by   Tony35NYC
    C'mon,
    My wife is reading your posts and she finds your views of feminism to be very amusing but not very modern. Surely you realize that this discussion is not about the rights of female patients at all, but about the narrowminded political views of some female nurses who refuse to accept the idea of men in L&D.

    The ship has sailed, and the men are here to stay. In years to come there will probably be a lot more of us in L&D, too.




    Quote from nurseunderwater
    Tony -I have to say that your one-dimensional
    perception of women either makes you seem very young or of limited expeirence. I also find your description of women during exams repulsive. :stone:

    When you gain some respect for the diverse nature of women as a culture perhaps we can explore this further. In the interim - I wish you opprtunites for greater insight into the complexities of feminist culture.

    Kate
  2. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from jwk
    Sorry I couldn't post a longer statement - I was busy doing C-Sections.
    Oh my I did not realize that I was in the presence of someone of such importance. carry on then...
  3. by   Tony35NYC
    Nurseunderwater, The fact that you're digging up old posts to try to rationalize your views tells me one thing about you: You're more concerned about being right than you are about hearing other people's views.

    Please don't get me wrong. I wish you well, and I respect your right to your opinions. But, please also bear in mind that you owe the rest of us the same courtesy. The world is a much bigger place than any one of us, and in the long run our opinions really don't matter. Life is much too short, my friend. Don't take stuff like this so seriously.

    Take care.


    Quote from nurseunderwater
    Tony -

    Just saw this:

    "I wasn't going to confess this, but what the heck. I'm only halfway through nursing school and I love it, especially the patient teaching part. I really love working with people and helping them to get better. I seriously believe I'm on the perfect career path for me, and its not just because of "helper's high". "

    hard to reconcile this with the same person who posted above.
    Last edit by Tony35NYC on May 29, '04
  4. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from Tony35NYC
    C'mon,
    My wife is reading your posts and she finds your views of feminism to be very amusing but not very modern. Surely you realize that this discussion is not about the rights of female patients at all, but about the narrowminded political views of some female nurses who refuse to accept the idea of men in L&D.

    The ship has sailed, and the men are here to stay. In years to come there will probably be a lot more of us in L&D, too.
    I am not surprised that she finds it amusing.

    Regarding the two seperate issues of nurses needs vs. mothers comfort level -

    I as a nurse wouldn't mind men in L&D

    As a woman in labor my personal preference would be not to be attended by a male nurse.

    enough said. it's pretty simple.
  5. by   jwk
    Quote from nurseunderwater
    Oh my I did not realize that I was in the presence of someone of such importance. carry on then...
    My point flew right over your head (male, in L&D, taking care of women, etc.)
  6. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from Tony35NYC
    Nurseunderwater, The fact that you're digging up old posts to try to rationalize your views tells me one thing about you: You're more concerned about being right than you are about hearing other people's views.

    Please don't get me wrong. I wish you well, and I respect your right to your opinions. But, please also bear in mind that you owe the rest of us the same courtesy. The world is a much bigger place than any one of us, and in the long run our opinions really don't matter. Life is much too short, my friend. Don't take stuff like this so seriously.

    Take care.
    I was curious Tony about the type of person that would choose to use the expression - spreadeagled. I don't think my this is odd. I have not engaged in any type of debate with you before. I tend to be the kind of person who avoids such heated topics. This is not one I felt I could in all integrity ignore. Birth and birth culture happen to be important topics to me personally. Again, I do not take issue with men in the L&D unit. On this we agree. I also don't see male nurses as some sort of looming threat. I do see the arguments in this thread that seek to invalidate a womans choice surrounding the gender of her nurse as dangerous. They shame women who are of a different birth culture and this is where my irritation lies.
  7. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from jwk
    My point flew right over your head (male, in L&D, taking care of women, etc.)
    ditto :chuckle
  8. by   leslie :-D
    kate, i SO relate to the sisterhood of laboring/delivering and that is my personal preference. if other pts. don't mind male nurses assisting then there's really no issues.

    tony- your connotation of women spreadeagling is eloquent linguistics at its' finest. carry on nurse.
  9. by   camay1221_RN
    Ultimately, it is respecting the wishes of the woman in labor.
  10. by   finchertwins
    Not many things get my attention but at times something just grabs it and grinds its way to my core. Nursing had been a female dominated field for the past 200 years and have done a wonderful job, but times have changed and the age old gender lines have been smashed like the Berlin wall. I personally have no problem with anyone doing a job or aspiring to do something once dominated by the opposite gender. I am a student nurse(RN), was a paramedic w/female partner, and when I was 17 worked in a l&d/peds clinic in East Africa for about a year. Never in that time have I ever given a person trouble for being the wrong gender for the job, never have I recieved grief visa versa. No one shall dictate where I can and can't work. Never had a Labor and Delivery, or mother/baby patient request a dif care giver. On the converse it is up to the client, to date I have yet to be switched with a female health care worker, in fact I had a less than nice little old lady that refused any male caregiver allow me to care of her and she was the nicest patient on the floor. So lets take this thread and bury it in the manure pill, gender has nothing to do with it, what does count is what kind of nurse you are and how well you care for your clients!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  11. by   leslie :-D
    i thought it was pretty much agreed that gender is irrelevant but patients' wishes were to be respected. am i missing something fincher?
  12. by   Tony35NYC
    I was just trying to illustrate that the anti-male rhetoric in this thread is more about old-school feminist politics than it is about the desires of most women who give birth. My point all along is that I've never seen any scientific study which proves that most women who give birth would rather not have a male nurse. In fact, most of the information I've seen on this topic has been from female L&D nurses who, from the tone of their words, seem to be more interested in protecting their turf. I was curious to know what you mean by 'birth culture' but now I'm sure it really doesn't matter to me because I'm willing to bet money that it somehow diminishes the paternal role, which as a man, I reject outright.

    I'm extremely close to my kids, I feed them, I bathe them, I hug them, I love them, spend lots of time with them...just as much as their momma does. Again, I don't see what's so exclusively 'feminine' about giving birth or the need for an all-female nursing staff during delivery. As a man, I spent a lot of time in pre-birth classes with my wife. I was also in the delivery room with her the whole time while both my kids were being born, the physician in both instances was a man, and the fact that the nurses were women didn't mean a thing to us. All we wanted was to take our babies and get the heck outta there as soon as possible. Our only concern is that our babies were healthy. My wife couldn't have cared any less about the doctor or the nurses and I couldn't either, and that's our experience vis-a-vis yours, so it really is moot for me to comment any further in this thread.

    Kind regards.


    Quote from nurseunderwater
    I was curious Tony about the type of person that would choose to use the expression - spreadeagled. I don't think my this is odd. I have not engaged in any type of debate with you before. I tend to be the kind of person who avoids such heated topics. This is not one I felt I could in all integrity ignore. Birth and birth culture happen to be important topics to me personally. Again, I do not take issue with men in the L&D unit. On this we agree. I also don't see male nurses as some sort of looming threat. I do see the arguments in this thread that seek to invalidate a womans choice surrounding the gender of her nurse as dangerous. They shame women who are of a different birth culture and this is where my irritation lies.
  13. by   BRANDY LPN
    Quote from lisamc1
    So a woman comes to the hospital in labor and requests a female nurse. You are going to ask her if she was ever raped or sexually abused to see if she qualifies?
    So your stand is that there should not be any men in OB?

    Because if there is a male nurse on the floor and the pts all want a female nurse guess what it's not possible, it is not about the nurse and it is not about the (one) laboring woman, it is about the good of all the patients on the floor. And a women who requests an all female delivery because of abuse or religous beliefs has a much more valid reason for that request. I have worked with male OB nurses and if I hadn't moved just prior to delivering I would have definately requested to have one in particular for my nurse, because he was the most compassionate, knowledgeable OB nurse I have ever had the plearsure of working with.

    And our prenatal records have the information about past sexual abuse in them, as well as information on domestic abuse, it is up to the woman to answer these questions honestly during her antepartum visits.

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