Making the transition easier???

  1. I'm a brand new RN going into an ICU at a regional referral hospital. I previously worked ED there. I knew that I would have trouble with the transition to RN (from Tech.)so I chose to stay at the same hospital, thinking that I would have some support systems in place. Now, I find I have switched "services" SO I now have a new unit, co-workers, manager, and supervisors. I feel like my family has left me!
    My manager is great, and my coworkers seem to be normal/nice. They are, however, somewhat exclusive, which I hope is unconcious, if not I'm in trouble!!! I know htat time usually irons these uncomfortable feelings out. Is there anything I can do to ease this transition, other than stick it out? I should try to stick it out shouldn't I (love the unit, pt type,. size and schedule.)? Any insight into this transition would be helpful...
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   JillR
    I too went from a tech in the ER to a position on the floor, but not ICU, I work med/surg. I work in a very small hospital and It was an easy transition in that I knew most of the RN's, LPN's and CNA's there already.

    Even so, it take others a while to trust you. I had no problem with my supervisor trusting me because we worked together in the ER. Some of the nurses were surprised at my ability to comfortable with calling the doctors and such. I think they thought I was a little too bold bacause I will come right out and ask the doctors for what I want when I call them. I also am a EMT-I and am used to calling in for orders and such, so I knew the docs already.

    My point is, give them time. These nurses need to see that they can trust you, and they will, but you have alot to learn. It takes a while to get accepted into a tight group like the one you have described. You will be fine. It sounds like you work with a great bunch, your lucky.

    Good luck. JillR
  4. by   hollykate
    Thanks Jill,
    I am having the same experience with RN's being surprised that I can actually call the lab and complain that I don't have a result yet, or talk to the residents. Seems their residents were supposed to be their residents- I got a lot of flack when they all came up to me and started to congratulate me on passing boards and saying whatever residents usually say... SO, maybe it is the fault of being a little too familiar with some things and very unfamiliar with other stuff- ie- did you ever do (on purpose) a ventric in the ED or recover one there (No way in ours!)I have a good attitude, and know my limitations right now, no one has yet to tell me that I think I know too much, usually they say, you did just fine....
    One RN who transferred to the ED spent her first month baking cookies/etc every time she worked, while people liked the cookies, they didn't make her any more popular because as an RN she proved herself to be unreliable...I don't want to bake cookies for the next six months, so just wait the time out and hope I don't end up unreliable also? Is that the consensus? Seems to me that when we are secure in our enviroment, we should work a little harder to make someone insecure feel more secure. But I realize I have been guilty of this as well- the rest of the hospital calls it the ED mentality. Thanks again never knew this would be so hard! To top it off- I find my backup preceptor isnt in the same unit, so no floats for 3 months- every time i precept with her I go to a different ICU.... I think I should get float pool pay! oh to be a little more flexible, like a slinky....

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Making the transition easier???