Make license inactive?

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    My original nursing license is from Michigan. I moved to Texas a month ago and I now have my Texas nursing license. My license in Michigan is up for renewal and Im trying to decide if I should renew it, make it inactive, or let it expire? My husband is in the military and we will be moving every 3 years...we dont plan on being back in Michigan for a couple decades to come. I have read several blogs stating to never let go of your license go in the original state you got it. If I do decide to make my license inactive in Michigan, does anyone know how to do it?
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Your renewal paperwork from Michigan should have the option to make your license inactive included with it. If not, call the Michigan state board or check on the web site for more info.
  4. 0
    Keep them updated with your address. You will be able to make it inactive when you renew. Write yourself a note on a calendar or something, to be sure to look for the renewal notice. You don't want to miss it.
  5. 0
    I don't know about Michigan, but at least one state, maybe California(?), requires you to retake the NCLEX if your license is inactive for a certain number of years. That's certainly something I would check into and consider when making my decision.
  6. 0
    In CA the license becomes void and the NCLEX must be retaken and a new license applied for if one allows their license to be expired for more than four years. This rule does not apply to inactive licenses. An inactive license does not require the submission of CE credits but a fee is paid on each renewal anniversary. The license becomes expired if one fails to submit CE credits and fails to pay either the renewal fee or the inactive fee. As long as you are sending money to the state of CA on a regular basis, your license is safe. Stop sending them money and you will pay the price after four years.
  7. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    In CA the license becomes void and the NCLEX must be retaken and a new license applied for if one allows their license to be expired for more than four years. This rule does not apply to inactive licenses. An inactive license does not require the submission of CE credits but a fee is paid on each renewal anniversary. The license becomes expired if one fails to submit CE credits and fails to pay either the renewal fee or the inactive fee. As long as you are sending money to the state of CA on a regular basis, your license is safe. Stop sending them money and you will pay the price after four years.

    See, that's how good my memory is!
  8. 0
    It's not that expensive, I would keep mine active. You never know when you might need it, especially in this economy.
  9. 0
    Thanks for all the replies. I just called Michigan BON and they don't have an option to become inactive; either you renew your license or you let it expire. So I'm going to play it safe and keep it active. Thanks again.
  10. 0
    One thing that blew me away: Florida was going to charge me as much for making my license inactive as I would have paid for a renewal (Oklahoma charged me nothing). I obtained the license by endorsement several years ago, believing that I might have to move there (the move never happened). I was very short of cash at the time the license came due, so I had no choice but to let it lapse. I will have to see what it will cost to reactivate it should I ever need it in the future.
    Last edit by Orca on Feb 9, '10
  11. 0
    If I understand you correctly, you live in MI, are moving to TX, have a Tx nursing license - if you don't plan to live in MI for a couple of decades why not let it expire? Then, when you go back to MI, reapply?

    My husband was military too and I was licensed in several states for several different things: LPN, RN and APN.

    As soon as I moved, I let the previous one expire and then if/when I move back, will reapply for licensure.

    As long as you keep an active license somewhere you should be fine.


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