Major venting about some CNA's - page 5

First, let me say that I am not venting against all CNA's or even most...I've been one myself. I know how hard they work. I applaude the good ones. My problem is the majority of the ones at... Read More

  1. by   Flo1216
    Actually, I don't see why you would be ruffling feathers. You are right on the money. Some people have a bad experience with a certain member of a health care team and then suddenly it turns into a virtual boxing match. The CNA in question is a bad worker..it doesn't make all CNAS bad workers. Same goes for RNS, LPNS, etc. I am sure we know RNS who we would trust with our lives and others that we wouldn't let wipe our ass. It's all about the individual, their personality and their work ethic.
  2. by   Q.
    And let it be known that the original poster never meant to bash ALL CNAs (as she stated in her first post) but that she was going off about THIS particular CNA.
  3. by   Flo1216
    By the way, CNAS ARE taught that if you do an accucheck and you get tissue fluid, to recheck it.(though I cannot speak for Mario) It's a finger stick, for crying out loud. RNS are trained to do them the exact same way as CNAS are.
  4. by   nurse wisdom
    Well some people have no manners do they?

    I'm sorry some people can t find a better way to communicate than Shut up. It sounds very frustrating.

    Whenever someone loses it like this (happens to me all the time- must be my hairstyle) let the person know how you feel about the interaction and how can you handle it in the future

    Vent and find some way to let it go. Dont let one or two or even 10 CNA's wreck your idea of CNAs.
  5. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by Flo1216
    "another good reason for only allowing nurses to do such tasks...."


    Oh, brother.
    For every cna that you swear is trained to report any abnormal value and will reliably do so I will show you one that won't=or worse,one that takes several fingersticks at once and mixes up the results that she reports to the nurse ....If I am the nurse administering insulin based on sliding scale coverage you had better believe that I am obtaining the fingerstick myself......I have well thought out reasons for my opinions-based on things I have seen happen in acute and long term settings....The above response to my post just illustrates the attitudes that the originator of this thread is probably talking about...And-she did not "demand" that the cna's do anything---read the post again-she demanded support from her supervisor....as she should...When did "telling"someone whom is working UNDER YOUR SUPERVISION become politically in-correct? Do you understand that while you may be responsible for the adl's of 12 to 16 residents that the nurse is responsible for you and the other cna's-insuring that you do your jobs all while doing her own-that's why you are waving goodbye to the nurse as you leave on time at shift change-and the nurse is still at the desk...."Oh brother"? Oh,please...grow up...and knock that chip off of your shoulder-before you run off half cocked and harm someone in your care..."Oh brother"-sounds like a post meant to start a flame.....
  6. by   rebelwaclause
    Originally posted by Susy K
    I think alot of you are assuming alot here; assuming she had an attitude?! Ok, nothing excuses an attitude, but if the nurse asked for a blood sugar at a certain time, even WITH the attitude, then act upon the attitude, DON'T risk the patient's safety by blatantly doing something against what you were told to do. I think you all lost the big picture here. The big picture is that FOR THE SAFETY OF THE PATIENT, her blood sugar should have been checked at 0600, not 0545 or any other time determined by an unlicensed personnel. Take up the issue of attitude (IF there was any) with the individual or the manager; certainly DON'T take out your anger on the patients by refusing to do cares when deemed appropriate by a licensed nurse.

    So...if a physician told you in a bossy manner to give the patient a pain med NOW, would you refuse to give it NOW because he didn't ask you nice, and leave the patient in pain and give the pain med when YOU felt like it? Come on. Grow up. Give the pain med and address the physician attitude separately.

    Take the blood sugar at the requested time, and LATER discussed how it was asked of you. For pete's sake. It all ain't about you, people. It's about the patient, remember?

    That CNA was wrong.
    ^5. Yep. Uh-huh. Some CNA's get on my LAST *******' nerves with the "ask me nicely" BS. I do ask nicely, and some still decide WTF they want to do, and when they want to do it. Fortunately, union is available when management won't mediate attitudinal complaints among staff.
  7. by   EmeraldNYL
    Before I started nursing school, I took a CNA class, and it was only 2 weeks! They really didn't teach us a whole lot besides how to bathe people. At the LTC facility I worked at CNA's were not allowed to do accuchecks. I think it's fine for CNA's to do accuchecks, but I've heard that in some places CNA's are allowed to pass meds! This is frightening... giving someone medication is a huge responsibility.
  8. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by Furball
    Pts truly are individuals.
    edited
    You do what's best for the pt. If you only follow guidelines you will be mediocre at best maybe even dangerous at times. Use your freaking brain. Or at least LISTEN to the person who has the education under his/her cap to make these decisions.

    Sometimes (most times?) RN's just don't have the time to explain every little thing.
    I couldn't have said it better myself. Underlying all the disrespect is the assumption that not only has the CNA more knowledge, more information, and better judgment than the nurse, and that the CNA has the right to know the rationale behind every request.

    Well, it ain't happenin' -- it just ain't happenin'....

    I'm happy to share info and teaching with CNA's or students, but not in a situation like this, where the reason that I'm asking is because I don't have time to do it myself. Goes to follow that if I had time to explain, I'd prolly have time to do it without help.

    The CNA's who tell me that they don't have time to do something I've asked, but then get their 1/2 hour break, both 15-minute breaks, and then leave on time, while I'm still stuck running around for another hour or hour and a half, and then whine that I don't help them???!! that bugs me, that truly bugs me.
  9. by   Flo1216
    ktwlpn....are we going to start THIS again? Maybe you work with some badly trained CNAS. And it seems as though YOU are the one with the chip on your shoulder, considering that you go off on a rampage in response to my every post. I think smoke comes out of my computer every time I read one of your " retorts" . I too, am entitled to my opinion. And not for nothing, for someone who is so sensitive about " lpn bashing" you are certainly quick to bash everyone else. Especially when they disagree with you.
  10. by   essarge
    While working as a tech in the ER, I often had CNA's assigned to work with me. They were to do vitals etc on any holds we had and help me out when I needed it. It was a teamwork thing.

    I have since transferred to the floor and it is a whole different animal. While I have had little problem with any of the nurses (they all know that I am a student nurse) I have had more problem with the CNAs who have been there for a while and think that they are nurses.

    These are the people who get an attitude with student's. Sit around and read the chart and "evaluate" the patient. This is one of my pet peeves! If they want to be a nurse then they should go back to school and get the education REQUIRED to be one!!!! That's what I did at 47yo so when they state "I'm too old for that", I find it unacceptable.

    Now, that being said, if they give me an attitude or tell me to do something that I know is wrong or beyond what my scope of practice is as a CNA, I tell them that. And if they decide to write me up or give me more of an attitude, I let the "higher ups" handle it and haven't gotten in any trouble yet.

    By the way, I really miss the ER but nights were killing me with school, but I hope to get back there after I graduate in May '04.
  11. by   Flo1216
    "Oh,please...grow up...and knock that chip off of your shoulder-before you run off half cocked and harm someone in your care..."

    Why would my saying " Oh, brother " harm someone in my care? What kind of thing is that to say? You don't even know me. How presumptuous you are. You work with some dopey CNAS so you make a blanket generalization about all of them ? CNAS also do venipuncture and EKGS but I guess you want to do that yourself too, supernurse. And how do you do several fingersticks at once? Doesn't your CNA write down the results between pts? I know an LPN who gave insulin to the wrong pt once. Should LPNS no longer be allowed to administer insulin?
  12. by   Flo1216
    That particular CNA was wrong. Just plain wrong. IS anyone arguing that? I just don't understand why they get away with it.
  13. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by Sleepyeyes
    I couldn't have said it better myself. Underlying all the disrespect is the assumption that not only has the CNA more knowledge, more information, and better judgment than the nurse, and that the CNA has the right to know the rationale behind every request.

    Well, it ain't happenin' -- it just ain't happenin'....

    I'm happy to share info and teaching with CNA's or students, but not in a situation like this, where the reason that I'm asking is because I don't have time to do it myself. Goes to follow that if I had time to explain, I'd prolly have time to do it without help.

    The CNA's who tell me that they don't have time to do something I've asked, but then get their 1/2 hour break, both 15-minute breaks, and then leave on time, while I'm still stuck running around for another hour or hour and a half, and then whine that I don't help them???!! that bugs me, that truly bugs me.

    Amen!! Especially that last paragraph!! We have several CNA's who are worth their weight in gold, but a few of them have decided that at 1400 their job is done! (The shift ends at 1515). I am trying to get my paperwork done and stuff and call lights are lighting up the hall like a Christmas tree. Usually the patients are wanting 7-up, an extra blanket, ambulated. I don't mind doing these tasks, but when there are several CNA's sitting at the main desk looking at the latest Avon catalog while the patients are wanting this stuff, I get testy.... I like to be able to go home on time too.....But for the most part, we are pretty fortunate and our CNA's are great....

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