Major venting about some CNA's - page 18

First, let me say that I am not venting against all CNA's or even most...I've been one myself. I know how hard they work. I applaude the good ones. My problem is the majority of the ones at... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    NO--- NO ONE *HAS* TO escort smokers ANYwhere....all we need do is say we will NOT....it's no different to me than others refusing to participate and/or assist with other things that are not in line with their most basic principles. Really, WHAT hospital makes it a NURSING responsibility ABOVE all the OTHER things we have to do, to take people out to smoke? When we come here frequently to complain how people are not even getting BASIC nursing care ...we make it a priority to take people out to do an unhealthy thing like smoke? It's insane!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 28, '02
  2. by   Q.
    I agree with you Deb, but I guess where I worked, we all viewed it as a necessary evil (along with many other things we had to do) and just did it as fairly as possible.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    What's fair, is offering an alternative...such as gum or a patch and informing them upon arrival, no one will be available to take them to smoke...if they must do so, they must be escorted by s/o or family and NOT nursing. Or even more fair; having a policy in place that disallows smoking on hospital grounds, period. But I have to hand it to you, those that do this...you are nicer than me. I just can't. NO time, NO inclination.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 28, '02
  4. by   austin heart
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    Suzy yours must have been a FAT-STAFFED floor for you to have time to stand at glass doors, watching people smoke. WHERE I WORK there is NO TIME TO DO ALL WE HAVE TO DO in the way of teaching, beyond basics, let alone all the niceties, like TRUE labor support..(beyond getting an epidural started for someone)........let ALONE escorting a smoker out to do something I am totally against, healthwise. Like I said before, on my radar screen of priorities, this is not even a blip.
    i too have never worked at a facility were i had time to do this , must be nice to have all that down time. and suzy, you say you worked ob and that your pst came to the hospital to have their babys, right? what were these people smoking for anyway? by you taking them out to smoke, it makes it look like you advocate smoking in pregnancy. i thought that was a big no-no? even if these people just had their baby, if they have to go right out and smoke, prob meens that they smoked through their pregnancy. looks like that would be a good time to start the pt education. ie:smoking is bad for both the pt and the her baby.
    Last edit by austin heart on Dec 29, '02
  5. by   mattsmom81
    At least Susy had a glass partition between her and the smoke. At my facility we had to physically go outside with them and sit in the smoking area which was ridiculous...our nurses rarely got a break anyway for themselves, let alone with smoking patients... our one smoking aide couldn't get her work done either with the patient demands to smoke, even with 'group smoking' trips, which she sometimes tried to do to organize her workload...LOL!

    Best solution: policy to turf the responsibility to family and away from staff.

    I know this doesn't work in LTC...those pesky residents' rights..LOL! I don't know how LTC and home health staff nonsmokers can handle this duty to be honest. I have heard there are now even 'smoking assist devices' to assist handicapped patients in their 'right' to smoke.

    Gee...we've morphed to a smoking thread now....LOL!
  6. by   mario_ragucci
    Do PT's catch fire?
    If you give a dementia PT a chance to smoke, do they try to light fires, or other stuff we used to do as kids? It's common for dementia PT's to regress, I heard, so I'd like to know if anyone has a story about "fire-bug" PT's. I'm sorry, I'm a CNA.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    far as I know, Mario, we are all flamable as carbon-based living things. just look at all the flames in this thread....lol.
  8. by   Furball
    Yup, pts do catch on fire. Witnessed one about 5 years ago go up in flames in her room, o2 on. Ewww... She DIDN'T have dementia. She was just horribly addicted, stubborn and incredibly stupid.
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by austin heart
    i too have never worked at a facility were i had time to do this , must be nice to have all that down time. and suzy, you say you worked ob and that your pst came to the hospital to have their babys, right? what were these people smoking for anyway? by you taking them out to smoke, it makes it look like you advocate smoking in pregnancy. i thought that was a big no-no? even if these people just had their baby, if they have to go right out and smoke, prob meens that they smoked through their pregnancy. looks like that would be a good time to start the pt education. ie:smoking is bad for both the pt and the her baby.
    Ok for one, I have a cold so I am a bit punchy. But let me start off by stating I am getting awfully tired of people insinuating that because we escorted patients out to smoke, that I must've sat on my a$$ or that we were a cushy floor or fat-staffed or had down time. We did what we had to do and got it done with TEAMWORK, hence my questioning about refusing to do things in the first place. None of us refused to do even the shyt aspects of patient care.

    Secondly, Austin, patients couldn't smoke during labor; I was talking about POST-PARTUM. Sometimes, you need to prioritize things a bit here. No, we don't advocate smoking and yes we educate on quitting, however, we're not going to win that battle at that given moment so WHILE ESCORTING THEM DOWN TO SMOKE, some of us would use that time to educate on other pressing issues at the time.

    Now, enough of this already? Yeesh. We did what we had to do and got it done. If I hear one more backhanded comment about how much downtime I had I think I might have a coronary.
  10. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    far as I know, Mario, we are all flamable as carbon-based living things.
    This is false because, though our dermis is carbon based, it will not ignite, like wood or cloth. No PT could ever produce a flame hot enough to set fire to skin. It has to get ReALLY hot first, like >600F B4 an organic substance, like a PT, would ignite. The introduction of O2 to any "burning" substance could produce such heat, as furbal mentions. Smoking at or near any compressed O2 should be strictly prohibited because the compressed gas could cause some burning to occur REALLY fast, causing an explosion to harm everybody.
  11. by   mattsmom81
    I could tell someboring 'old nurse' stories here...cuz I remember when patients and visitors smoked freely all over the hospitals (nurses too)..I remember nurses and docs smoking at the station way back in my younger days..hehe)

    Wastebasket fires, bedclothes fires, 3rd degree burns...lots of this from patients smoking in bed/falling asleep. And yes, 3rd degree burns from the o2 cannula too...and the molten tubing burn lines on their faces...

    I remember putting out many wastebasket fires in patient rooms and hallways before the anti smoking policies came about. Hospital fires almost always involve patients smoking according to even most recent fire safety training data. And many dementia patients will have fire mishaps (among others) at home which lead to their move to LTC.
  12. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by mattsmom81
    And many dementia patients will have fire mishaps (among others) at home which lead to their move to LTC.
    heh...
    reminds me that I, for one, am really glad that the Alzheimer's pt who wandered into the unit kitchen, did not first turn on the oven before he pulled open the door, sat down, and used it for a commode.....


    eeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwww! :stone:
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    This is false because, though our dermis is carbon based, it will not ignite, like wood or cloth.
    Actually, we are flammable. We are not combustible, which is what you are referring to. We are not flammable at normal room temperature, however, given the right temperature (such as fire) we will ignite.

    In the general sense, we are flammable.

    Just like asking: Can we breathe? Yes. Can we breathe with a truck parked on our chest? No.
    Can we fly? Yes. *qualifier*: if you put us in a airplane.

    In the most general of senses, yes, we are flammable.

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