Maintaining the license without work, and a general rant - page 2

So, I'm one of those once-upon-a-time new grads who is no longer a new grad but who has been unable to find employment. I'm building this little patchwork of short term employment situations (camp... Read More

  1. Visit  BeeSupporter} profile page
    0
    California begging for nurses? No way. Certainly not for new grads! Also flooded with experienced nurses from low paying southern states who chasing the $. Also re: moving where jobs are - hiring managers are becoming reluctant to take on new grads from high wage states because they know there is a higher probability of those RNs returning to their state of origin once they have that golden 6-12 mos. experience. They want people who will stay once trained. Can't blame they for that.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  XXWeaponX} profile page
    0
    You are getting jobs like Flu shot nurse, and things like that. Have you considered to focus your job hunt outside of acute care? You are getting jobs, it is clicking with some interviewers, which means you'd click with others. Consider working in an medical clinic, prison, jail, or research environment instead of a hospital.

    Also, what about registries?
  4. Visit  Biffbradford} profile page
    1
    I find it interesting how many times it's suggested that older RNs looking for work, should focus on nursing homes.
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. Visit  caliotter3} profile page
    3
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    While it's human nature to complain I find it odd that so many "new grads" continually sit in a saturated market and complain there is no work.
    If I were an auto worker sitting in Detroit wondering when I could get hired building cars when no one is making cars I would have the same complaint.
    Here's a suggestion: Go where the jobs are...

    Florida, California... Hell, Texas is begging for nurses. Houston, Dallas, Killeen/Waco. (Waco was even offering money to relocate. When's the last time you've seen relocation money?)
    2009 and no job??? Laughable...
    Don't suggest coming to CA expecting a job. There are tons of new grads pouring into the job market every few months who can't find work in addition to the very experienced who can't find work.
  6. Visit  hotflashion} profile page
    3
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    Here's a suggestion: Go where the jobs are...
    Thank you for your compassion. I do agree with what you say but find the way you said it quite offensive.

    At least some of the profs at my alma mater now advise their students to go where the jobs are. However, in 2008, 2009, it was not yet known (or perhaps not yet acknowledged) within the protected, hallowed walls of my college that there was a saturation. I was unlucky enough to do my practicum at a hospital that shut down its new grad program before I had a chance to apply. I am in my late 50's and happily tethered to a man who makes an excellent income; WE are not pulling up roots to take a > 50% reduction in household income. Now, that would be stupid. Yes, I could move away from my home and relationship to find a job. I considered it. I decided I didn't want to do that. It's not entirely off the table, hence the reason I was looking at a neighboring state's licensing requirements. I guess I'm just not that desperate yet.
    Last edit by hotflashion on Sep 13, '11 : Reason: add a word to clarify
    Esme12, MombearNurse, and pinkchris2000 like this.
  7. Visit  XXWeaponX} profile page
    0
    Quote from caliotter3
    Don't suggest coming to CA expecting a job. There are tons of new grads pouring into the job market every few months who can't find work in addition to the very experienced who can't find work.
    Yeah, seconding this. I really want to go back to school for my MSN/RN (I'm an LVN). But I'm scared that I will leave my LVN job only to find that I can't get a job as an RN.
  8. Visit  hotflashion} profile page
    4
    Quote from Biffbradford
    I find it interesting how many times it's suggested that older RNs looking for work, should focus on nursing homes.
    Yeah, that is kind of funny. I could work there and then just move in, in a few years.
    Esme12, slackula, AreEn17, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  hotflashion} profile page
    1
    Quote from XXWeaponX
    You are getting jobs like Flu shot nurse, and things like that. Have you considered to focus your job hunt outside of acute care? You are getting jobs, it is clicking with some interviewers, which means you'd click with others. Consider working in an medical clinic, prison, jail, or research environment instead of a hospital.

    Also, what about registries?
    I have given up thinking I have the remotest chance to work in an acute care setting. I don't really want to work in an acute care setting anyway, I realized this after a year of concentrating my job search on hospitals. I still think that 1-2 years acute care experience is a good base, maybe even the best, but it's just not going to happen. I have applied to many different settings: LTC, rehab, long term acute, sub-acute, abortion clinic, assisted living, psychiatric hospital, well known health care for the homeless program in nearby Bigtown, public health, VA. My latest targets are community health centers/clinics because I think that is the type of nursing I want to do and the population I want to work with. I don't know what a registry is, but it sounds like an agency; agencies in my area do not want nurses without experience.

    As for prison nursing, I've been on two tours and had one interview. The first prison was a federal prison and the physical requirements are quite rigorous! Since my goal is to get fit this year, it's possible that I would be able to be in shape enough to complete the almost-like-basic training required. The other tour and interview was at a state prison for women; they gave me a 5 minute interview (TYVM), and I obviously didn't have what they were looking for. Research is one of the areas I have an interest in, but rare is the job that does not require experience in that setting. I have tried to get hired as a clinical research coordinator (I would be very happy to start there!) as a way to get my foot in the door, but when I finagled a conversation with the hiring manager (after she'd evidently decided not to interview me), she told me outright that she wouldn't hire me because once I found an RN job I would leave and she wanted someone who would stay 2 years.

    The last interview I had was for a part time position at an adult day health center. Not my first choice, but I would probably enjoy that population. The hiring manager told me she didn't want to hire a new grad but she'd only received applications from new grads. I thought I did well on the interview, but never received a call back. I did not pursue it because I was wary of being dropped into a situation without adequate training. (Already been there done that, it was dangerous and I got out after 4 weeks.)

    I keep trying. I will keep trying. But it's a grind. And I hate being in limbo.
    gaylarn4 likes this.
  10. Visit  applewhitern} profile page
    1
    Sad to say, but a lot of it probably is your age. They keep wanting to raise the retirement age, but the truth is that once you get in your 50's, it is much harder to find a job. Not just in nursing, but in everything. It is ridiculous for people to say "just move." I have a job, but if I didn't, there is no way I would consider moving away from my family and home.
    pinkchris2000 likes this.
  11. Visit  kaufer01} profile page
    2
    I'm only 24 and am in the same boat. I doubt it's only age related. I am even willing to move and have not had luck going that route. It's a tough job market out there right now.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and tyvin like this.
  12. Visit  caliotter3} profile page
    2
    Quote from XXWeaponX
    Yeah, seconding this. I really want to go back to school for my MSN/RN (I'm an LVN). But I'm scared that I will leave my LVN job only to find that I can't get a job as an RN.
    Read a post just yesterday from an LPN who got an RN license and is now unemployed. One of my employers told me that when the RN license came along, I would have to go get a year's experience with another employer before they would consider giving me work as an RN.
    pinkchris2000 and tyvin like this.
  13. Visit  Quickbeam} profile page
    3
    I am astonished at the proliferation of new schools of nursing in my region, all making pie in the sky promises about the great unsinkable nursing career. I'm in my 50's and I happen to be the only nurse in my group of friends. They all call me now, wanting to know if their kid should go to school for nursing. I give then the following: at 1 year, 20 % of my class had left nursing. At 5 years 50% were gone. By 10 years I was the only one still actively practicing. Even when jobs were begging, it isn't for everyone.
    Last edit by Quickbeam on Sep 13, '11 : Reason: typo
    Lovely_RN, hoopschick, and tyvin like this.
  14. Visit  brandy1017} profile page
    1
    I watched a video College Conspiracy and there was a dentist on it that had over $150,000 in loans with interest now over $250,000 and some of her loans were HEAL loans, govt healthcare loans and they have now banned her from taking care of medicare patients since that loan went into default. She says she can't take any medicare or govt workers and has been lucky the group she works for has accommodated her by giving her private pay/insurance patients but that she doesn't make near enough to pay back her loans.

    So I wonder how this applies to nurses with HEAL loans? Of course if you go into default for non-payment they will take your license to practice away any way so the point would be mute!

    I've read there are a lot of doctors and chiropractors with HEAL loans that cannot treat or get paid for medicare patients and there are in a catch 22. Chiropractors especially have had troubles keeping up a private practice and paying back student loans due to the over saturation in the market as well as insurance limitations in the first place.

    If its any comfort your not alone in the unemployment line. Until you can get full-time paid employment I would continue to turn to agency even consider getting travelers contract. Many nurses travel on 6 week assignments, room and board is paid for, plus your wage. Granted it would be difficult without having the solid experience but you could give it a try! Hopefully something will work out!
    tyvin likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top