Maintaining the license without work, and a general rant - page 5

by hotflashion

5,661 Views | 50 Comments

So, I'm one of those once-upon-a-time new grads who is no longer a new grad but who has been unable to find employment. I'm building this little patchwork of short term employment situations (camp nurse, flu shot nurse) and was... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from hotflashion
    I have given up thinking I have the remotest chance to work in an acute care setting. I don't really want to work in an acute care setting anyway, I realized this after a year of concentrating my job search on hospitals. I still think that 1-2 years acute care experience is a good base, maybe even the best, but it's just not going to happen. I have applied to many different settings: LTC, rehab, long term acute, sub-acute, abortion clinic, assisted living, psychiatric hospital, well known health care for the homeless program in nearby Bigtown, public health, VA. My latest targets are community health centers/clinics because I think that is the type of nursing I want to do and the population I want to work with. I don't know what a registry is, but it sounds like an agency; agencies in my area do not want nurses without experience.

    As for prison nursing, I've been on two tours and had one interview. The first prison was a federal prison and the physical requirements are quite rigorous! Since my goal is to get fit this year, it's possible that I would be able to be in shape enough to complete the almost-like-basic training required. The other tour and interview was at a state prison for women; they gave me a 5 minute interview (TYVM), and I obviously didn't have what they were looking for. Research is one of the areas I have an interest in, but rare is the job that does not require experience in that setting. I have tried to get hired as a clinical research coordinator (I would be very happy to start there!) as a way to get my foot in the door, but when I finagled a conversation with the hiring manager (after she'd evidently decided not to interview me), she told me outright that she wouldn't hire me because once I found an RN job I would leave and she wanted someone who would stay 2 years.

    The last interview I had was for a part time position at an adult day health center. Not my first choice, but I would probably enjoy that population. The hiring manager told me she didn't want to hire a new grad but she'd only received applications from new grads. I thought I did well on the interview, but never received a call back. I did not pursue it because I was wary of being dropped into a situation without adequate training. (Already been there done that, it was dangerous and I got out after 4 weeks.)

    I keep trying. I will keep trying. But it's a grind. And I hate being in limbo.
    Have you tried LTAC's? Long term acute care?
  2. 1
    Quote from chuckster
    I think you are being charitable to imply that our elected representatives believe that we have an "emergency shortage of nurses". They pretend to believe it which gives them the cover for backing HR 1929. While the evidence is sketchy, I believe that the lobbying for this bill is for purely economic reasons: To keep or even increase the numbers of nurses in order to control costs.

    Nursing wages have increased quite a bit in the last decade and are now seen by many hospitals and health care companies as one of their primary cost drivers. In our open market system, the more attractive salaries draw more interest in nursing, which drives demand for more nursing schools, followed by increased numbers of nurses entering the practice and eventually the slowing or cessation of upward pressure on wages. This is market equilibrium and after a short period where supply and demand are in balance, the cycle would reverse. This is kind of where we are now in the economic cycle and in a truly free market, we would start to see a gradual reduction in the production of new nurses, in turn leading to a shortage and then eventually, a repetition of the cycle.

    In my view, we no longer have that free and open market guided by the "invisible hand" that Adam Smith envisioned. Again in my view, our economic system is now much more plutocratic than capitalistic with large corporations and the wealthy now enjoying an almost unrestrained ability to manipulate the market to their purposes. So those large hospital corporations, insurance companies and other health care corporations continue to push the "nursing shortage" through their lobbyists and the mantra is picked up by legislators who are dependent on these companies for the cash needed to fund their election campaigns.

    The end result is a bill like HR 1929, whose real purpose is to ensure the continuing oversupply of nurses in order to maintain wage pressure. A great side "benefit" of HR 1929 for its proponents is that potential nursing students continue to see government corroboration of the nursing shortage and so apply continuing pressure on nursing schools to maintain or even increase enrollment. Thus, the proponents of HR 1929 get the double benefit of both more foreign nurses and more domestic nurses in the job market. I believe that end result will be precisely what big health care wants: Continued downward pressure on nursing wages for a much longer period than would be the case in a truly free market system.

    I frankly hope to be proved wrong in this but have the sinking feeling that I'm largely on the mark.
    I agree whole heartedly!!!
    tyvin likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from EmergencyNrse

    Florida, California... Hell, Texas is begging for nurses. Houston, Dallas, Killeen/Waco. (Waco was even offering money to relocate. When's the last time you've seen relocation money?)
    2009 and no job??? Laughable...
    Do you have a source to support your statement that these states are "begging for nurses?" I know many here who are looking for work would appreciate it. As an experienced nurse in Texas, I have not had trouble getting job offers. I have not heard the same from new grads, but I don't exactly know a boatload of them.
  4. 0
    Quote from Horseshoe
    Do you have a source to support your statement that these states are "begging for nurses?" I know many here who are looking for work would appreciate it. As an experienced nurse in Texas, I have not had trouble getting job offers. I have not heard the same from new grads, but I don't exactly know a boatload of them.

    I don't know about a boat load but I have been getting recruitment calls from Texas ans Tennessee for experienced and supervisor/director positions and I haven't had those in FOREVER......too bad I can't walk right now...
  5. 0
    Quote from esme12
    i don't know about a boat load but i have been getting recruitment calls from texas ans tennessee for experienced and supervisor/director positions and i haven't had those in forever......too bad i can't walk right now...
    yes, but when i said "boat load" i was referring to new grads being "begged" to work in texas. i think experienced nurses can find work in texas relatively easily, but it's the new grads (like the op) i'm wondering about.
  6. 0
    I think new grads are having trouble everywhere....
  7. 0
    Quote from Preeps
    Hmm. I was initially reading your post with empathy and understanding. Top of class, lots of extra activities, and the seeming motivation to plug away and do what it takes to find employment. Good on ya.

    But unfortunately when I got to the last few sentences of your post I thought I might understand the problem. Let's see: critical of other nurses that you don't even know (based on hearsay from PCTs??) Really? You deam others who have (the job you want) a job as lazy, inept, and lacking. If you come from a place of "I am the bomb" "first in my class" and think you are better, smarter, more caring than all the nurses currently employed maybe that is part of the problem. Maybe it comes across in the interiews. And yes, being older and overweight may play a part in not being hired. And that may not be fair but it is life. But I would work on the more sublte things. Maybe attitude and how you come across. Just a suggestion.
    I do not think I am better than ALL the nurses currently employed, but I know I would be a better nurse than some who are employed and that annoys me. I don't rant in my interviews. FWiW, the PCTs who told me stories were new grad nurses working as PCTs. Yes, that is hearsay, but these are nurses whose work ethic I know and who I would love to work with; I have no reason to doubt their observations.
    Last edit by hotflashion on Sep 15, '11 : Reason: Thought better of it.
  8. 2
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    While it's human nature to complain I find it odd that so many "new grads" continually sit in a saturated market and complain there is no work.
    If I were an auto worker sitting in Detroit wondering when I could get hired building cars when no one is making cars I would have the same complaint.
    Here's a suggestion: Go where the jobs are...

    Florida, California... Hell, Texas is begging for nurses. Houston, Dallas, Killeen/Waco. (Waco was even offering money to relocate. When's the last time you've seen relocation money?)
    2009 and no job??? Laughable...

    I'd like to know where these jobs are. I'm in Houston and if you don't have experience they won't even interview you.
    I know one recent ADN grad who went back into the mortage business ...housing market is really bad but apparently not as bad as the jobmarket for new grad nurses w/ no experience.
    luvazsun and XXWeaponX like this.
  9. 0
    Just an idea to throw out there that my sis came up with when she was recently job-hunting (medical field but not a nurse)...substitute teaching. Many school districts around me only require a certain amount of college credits to do so.

    Of course, with the way teachers are getting laid off, that may not be a viable option b/c of competition, but it was kinda thinking outside the box...since the nursing job box (especially for new grads) has slim pickings.
  10. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I don't know about a boat load but I have been getting recruitment calls from Texas ans Tennessee for experienced and supervisor/director positions and I haven't had those in FOREVER......too bad I can't walk right now...
    I can't walk right now either! Luckily for me, I work a desk job, and my patient interactions is with research subjects who are all ambulatory, so my time off work has been minimal. I am really empathetic to your situation. I hope you are back on your feet, literally, soon. Ive got another month and a 1/2 to go. (Broken knee/leg/ankle/torn achilles/meniscus/every ligament in my ankle.)


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