Maintaining the license without work, and a general rant - page 2

by hotflashion

5,754 Views | 50 Comments

So, I'm one of those once-upon-a-time new grads who is no longer a new grad but who has been unable to find employment. I'm building this little patchwork of short term employment situations (camp nurse, flu shot nurse) and was... Read More


  1. 7
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    Florida, California... Hell, Texas is begging for nurses. Houston, Dallas, Killeen/Waco. (Waco was even offering money to relocate. When's the last time you've seen relocation money?)
    2009 and no job??? Laughable...
    Besides what everyone else has already pointed out about relocating, and I can't speak for other places, but there is absolutely no where in California that is "begging" for new grads, which is the OP's primary roadblock, not the general availability of (experienced) nursing jobs.
  2. 0
    I am also a 2009 grad with limited experience. I have moved in an attempt to find work. I am originally from WI and moved to DE for an AmeriCorps program hoping to get a job on the East Coast in a hospital. There were plenty of jobs available in the area, but no one wanted to hire me because I didn't have experience (never mind that I've been a camp nurse and an EMT). Now I'm back in WI and still looking.

    Can't afford to move without knowing I have a job that will allow me to pay my bills once I get there.
  3. 1
    I'm shocked with all your credentials you still can't get a full-time job! Age discrimination may be a factor, I would dye your hair to look younger. Where I work, we have a lot of older nurses, most dye their hair. In fact only one has gone grey! Sometimes if I wait to long to dye my hair, I'll get a comment from a coworker pointing out my roots are showing, like I don't know and can't see them in a mirror! I like to color my hair personally, but it is expensive so I try to minimize how often I do it. While age discrimination exists even in nursing and you can see some hospitals that have almost all young fresh faces, there are places that hire older nurses. Check out AARP magazine/online because they rate older friendly businesses. Look at the places you are applying, stroll in and check out the staff, if you can find one with older nurses and not all young focus your efforts there.

    Also expand your job search to nursing homes, long term care, and research the managers. If you know there names many times you can google them or check them on linked in or pipl.com and learn a little more about them professionally and then you can contect them directly and request a job.

    What about all the places you have been volunteering or working short gigs at can you get help from anyone there re a job. Perhaps a doctor at the clinic has his own practice or can at least give you a reference for a job! What about agency if you can get a foot in a place thru agency, and people get to know you, that can be an in for a job!

    I'm really shocked that so many nurses are have trouble getting jobs, but I guess this is not really surprising thinking how many college grads can't get decent jobs, even with business degrees and how many law grads can't get jobs. So many schools offer nursing programs and more and more nursing schools are opening up I guess that's causing a glut of nurses. You may have to be open to relocating if that's possible!

    What are you doing now for money and health insurance? Did you have a job you quit before nursing? Is there any way to go back to that?

    Honestly, I'm older and still have 20 years to go and I wonder how I will make it. Eventually I would even consider a non-nursing job for better working conditions if it paid a living wage, but how many jobs like that exist in America today! I'm trying to get my mortgage paid off before I retire and sooner would be better, because then I wouldn't have the same money pressure as I do now.
    gaylarn4 likes this.
  4. 0
    California begging for nurses? No way. Certainly not for new grads! Also flooded with experienced nurses from low paying southern states who chasing the $. Also re: moving where jobs are - hiring managers are becoming reluctant to take on new grads from high wage states because they know there is a higher probability of those RNs returning to their state of origin once they have that golden 6-12 mos. experience. They want people who will stay once trained. Can't blame they for that.
  5. 0
    You are getting jobs like Flu shot nurse, and things like that. Have you considered to focus your job hunt outside of acute care? You are getting jobs, it is clicking with some interviewers, which means you'd click with others. Consider working in an medical clinic, prison, jail, or research environment instead of a hospital.

    Also, what about registries?
  6. 1
    I find it interesting how many times it's suggested that older RNs looking for work, should focus on nursing homes.
    Esme12 likes this.
  7. 3
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    While it's human nature to complain I find it odd that so many "new grads" continually sit in a saturated market and complain there is no work.
    If I were an auto worker sitting in Detroit wondering when I could get hired building cars when no one is making cars I would have the same complaint.
    Here's a suggestion: Go where the jobs are...

    Florida, California... Hell, Texas is begging for nurses. Houston, Dallas, Killeen/Waco. (Waco was even offering money to relocate. When's the last time you've seen relocation money?)
    2009 and no job??? Laughable...
    Don't suggest coming to CA expecting a job. There are tons of new grads pouring into the job market every few months who can't find work in addition to the very experienced who can't find work.
  8. 3
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    Here's a suggestion: Go where the jobs are...
    Thank you for your compassion. I do agree with what you say but find the way you said it quite offensive.

    At least some of the profs at my alma mater now advise their students to go where the jobs are. However, in 2008, 2009, it was not yet known (or perhaps not yet acknowledged) within the protected, hallowed walls of my college that there was a saturation. I was unlucky enough to do my practicum at a hospital that shut down its new grad program before I had a chance to apply. I am in my late 50's and happily tethered to a man who makes an excellent income; WE are not pulling up roots to take a > 50% reduction in household income. Now, that would be stupid. Yes, I could move away from my home and relationship to find a job. I considered it. I decided I didn't want to do that. It's not entirely off the table, hence the reason I was looking at a neighboring state's licensing requirements. I guess I'm just not that desperate yet.
    Last edit by hotflashion on Sep 13, '11 : Reason: add a word to clarify
    Esme12, MombearNurse, and pinkchris2000 like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    Don't suggest coming to CA expecting a job. There are tons of new grads pouring into the job market every few months who can't find work in addition to the very experienced who can't find work.
    Yeah, seconding this. I really want to go back to school for my MSN/RN (I'm an LVN). But I'm scared that I will leave my LVN job only to find that I can't get a job as an RN.
  10. 4
    Quote from Biffbradford
    I find it interesting how many times it's suggested that older RNs looking for work, should focus on nursing homes.
    Yeah, that is kind of funny. I could work there and then just move in, in a few years.
    Esme12, slackula, AreEn17, and 1 other like this.


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