Magnet hospitals - page 2

I've been hearing some stuff lately about "magnate hospitals". Could someone elaborate more on this -- I only know the basics. What are the qualities needed to get recognized as a magnate hospital?... Read More

  1. by   nekhismom
    I think magnet is a good idea, in theory. Not so sure it works in the real world, though. Hope I'm wrong, but that's my experience.
  2. by   nursemary9
    Hi

    We are in the process of going for magnet status!! Again, as someone else said--a JOKE!!
    Staffing is TERRIBLE!! Half of the nurses here don't know what they are doing!!Half don't even speak enough English for the patients to understand them.

    Conditions here are not great!!
  3. by   orrnlori
    We have magnet status, made a big deal out of it with local commercials, banners hanging outside the hospitals and greeting everyone at the elevators. I think it's just promotion for the hospital. No one asked my opinion about it during the visits. It was mostly the nurse managers and the staff development nurses involved with the review. I don't get it.
  4. by   -jt
    If your facility is not living up to the tenets of the Magnet designation and is turning it into a big joke, they dont deserve to have it. Nurses have stopped the applications of some such facilities (most recently in NJ) by informing the ANCC. You can let ANCC know whats going on at your facility anonymously:

    the ANCC, the organization that awards Magnet designation, wants to hear from staff nurses who are actually working at hospitals that have won or applied for Magnet status

    Although your comments are entered anonymously and you are not required to identify the facility in which you work, identifying the facility will provide ANCC with valuable information that can be incorporated into the evaluations of current and prospective Magnet facilities.

    This link will take you to the questionaire http://nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet/survey.html
  5. by   st4304
    I recently left an RN position at a magnet hospital. During the processes of obtaining magnet status, nursing mgt did everything. I remember hearing about it here and there, but no one really knew what it was. Once, we had to take a written test about magnet and the answers were attached. That was a good thing, because the wording of the questions was so complicated, I didn't even know what they were asking! So I (and everyone else in my dept) just copied the supplied answers verbatim onto the answer sheets and went on with our lives. When we got our magnet status, the hospital made a big deal with banners and advertising (newspapers, billboards, etc). I got a pin (in which the clasp broke the first day and I have no idea where it is now). I think it was more a feather in the cap of nursing mgt. than anything else, because it sure didn't effect me or my pay.

    I currently work staffing pool at three different hospitals, but will be returning to the magnet hospital next week. I guess I didn't realize how pro-nursing and progressive my magnet hospital was until I left it. But it was a good employer even before magnet, magnet didn't change that. Why did I leave in the first place? This was the only hospital I had ever worked as an RN and I guess I just wanted to see what was out there. So I found out what was out there, and now I return to my 'magnet hospital'.

    Your pal,

    Sherri

    CCU NRS, MOT = Mandatory Overtime.
  6. by   MrsWampthang
    Yeah, my Magnet pin's clasp kept coming unfastened so I keep it in my purse. I can't see what difference it has made at our hospital. It seems like the standards they use to award the magnet status should be basic standards for every hospital, so I don't see what the big deal was.

    JMHO, Pam
  7. by   wincha
    my hospital just got magnet status and i think we are a great hospital
  8. by   steelcityrn
    I believe MOT is mandated over time.....I second the fact the magnate hospital status means much more than alot of money was spent to become a member of the GOOD OLD BOYS CLUB.
  9. by   ohionicuRN
    My hospital received Magnet status about two yrs ago, if not for all the hype and advertising we nurses would have never noticed any difference. In an unrelated move in the previous year, Administration cut salaries for full-timers, also attempted to import Filipino nurses rather than address our sad working conditions and keep the good nurses they had. As many others in this thread have noted, it was all about PR and about fillling vacancies that only persisted because of the dangerous assignments and unresponsive/absent Managers.
    Last edit by ohionicuRN on Jan 17, '06
  10. by   CseMgr1
    I start work tomorrow as a contract Case Manager for our area's only "Magnet Hospital". As for their "Magnet" status, it is just another worthless piece of paper, if they are unable to live up to those standards as far as I am concerned. We'll see.
  11. by   workingforskies
    (This was posted here a few months ago)

    "Magnet Status" is a friggen fraud and means absolutely nothing to the day to day practice of the average nurse.

    Magnet Status is the brain child of the American Nurses Association and it is marketed on 3 different levels.

    1 - It is sold to the public as an assurance that they will recieve excellent nursing care. ("It's a 'Magnet' hospital, it must be good!")

    2 - It is sold to the hospitals as a means of raising their profile in their community and as a way to make them seem more attractive to nurses who might think about working there. ("Look at us, we are a 'Magnet' hospital. That means we are a place you want to get treated in AND we are a great place to work for!")

    3 - It is sold to nurses as an attractive place to work. ("If it's a 'Magnet' hospital, they must REALLY care about the nurses!")

    But go to the ANA's web site and plod through their page upon page of corporate speak and you will discover that the minimum standards a hospital must meet to obtain Magnet Status are what they would meet to pass a JACHO inspection. The ANA then extrapolates that out to create an assumption/illusion that if the hospital meets those standards, it's because of excellent nursing, there for.... it must me a great place to work/recieve care.

    I have personally worked at 2 hospitals which recieved that recognition while I worked in them. And not a damn thing changed! The nurse to patient ratios were still dangerous. (I.E. 3 padiatric bone marrow transplant patients to one RN. And a tech if you were really lucky.) No raise in pay when plenty of other non magnet hospitals in the same market paid a lot more. Same crappy benifits. (Can someone explain the logic of saying you get 7 paid holidays a year, but only 7.2 hours of each day of them???) No training for new managers on how to manage people. Being overwelmed in the ER on an almost nightly basis with no help and no hope. No reasonable dispute/dicipline process. (I.E. A complaint is made, you get written up/suspended/terminated with no chance to even have your side heard.)

    All in all, in my experience, the most important criteria a hospital has to meet in attaining Magnet Status is that the check has to clear.
  12. by   Keysnurse2008
    Quote from workingforskies
    (this was posted here a few months ago)

    "magnet status" is a friggen fraud and means absolutely nothing to the day to day practice of the average nurse.

    magnet status is the brain child of the american nurses association and it is marketed on 3 different levels.

    1 - it is sold to the public as an assurance that they will recieve excellent nursing care. ("it's a 'magnet' hospital, it must be good!")

    2 - it is sold to the hospitals as a means of raising their profile in their community and as a way to make them seem more attractive to nurses who might think about working there. ("look at us, we are a 'magnet' hospital. that means we are a place you want to get treated in and we are a great place to work for!")

    3 - it is sold to nurses as an attractive place to work. ("if it's a 'magnet' hospital, they must really care about the nurses!")

    but go to the ana's web site and plod through their page upon page of corporate speak and you will discover that the minimum standards a hospital must meet to obtain magnet status are what they would meet to pass a jacho inspection. the ana then extrapolates that out to create an assumption/illusion that if the hospital meets those standards, it's because of excellent nursing, there for.... it must me a great place to work/recieve care.

    i have personally worked at 2 hospitals which recieved that recognition while i worked in them. and not a damn thing changed! the nurse to patient ratios were still dangerous. (i.e. 3 padiatric bone marrow transplant patients to one rn. and a tech if you were really lucky.) no raise in pay when plenty of other non magnet hospitals in the same market paid a lot more. same crappy benifits. (can someone explain the logic of saying you get 7 paid holidays a year, but only 7.2 hours of each day of them???) no training for new managers on how to manage people. being overwelmed in the er on an almost nightly basis with no help and no hope. no reasonable dispute/dicipline process. (i.e. a complaint is made, you get written up/suspended/terminated with no chance to even have your side heard.)

    all in all, in my experience, the most important criteria a hospital has to meet in attaining magnet status is that the check has to clear.
    [font="garamond"]
    i could not have said it better myself. the title "magnet" hospital is a sham. it is quite literally a sham.at your hospital did they interview you???any of your coworkers?did they? i bet not.......they will interview a "very selectively chosen group" by that hospital.the ones who know there are safety issues like icus staffed with new grad nurses and a new grad in charge with no one acls certified on select nights will...of course ....be one of "those units" that they elect to not interiew.they will avoid those units like the plague and not ask the staff nurses any questions/be allowed access to them.safety...unfortunately is the last thing on some of these hospitals minds. until some of these nurses voices are heard.....the stories of how patient's safety needs are not being met by these hcf...it will continue. with things like staffing ratios being addressed legally in states such as california it is begining to be made public.....exactly"how " these things relate to the publics safety. they have to see how it affects them. when these hcf dont have actual "true" dispute resolution policies and employees are written up/terminated when they try to utilize that dispute resolution/complaint process...it too will make its way to the public.like barry adams....who complained about unsafe staffing....and after years of being an exception high performing employee...he made a valid complaint about unsafe staffing utilizing the hospitals dispute/complaint process.....want to know what happened to mr adams? he was fired. is that legal? no....want to know what happened? he brought it to the public.....he sued legally and .....won.when a hospital....attempts to silence a nurse by either writing them up or terminating them...it is quite legally wrong. thats why we have whistleblower laws...and we have a responsibility to speak out.and when these hcf's want to try to "manipulate" and write up/terminate the employees who do speak out.......well........they usually are just providing that nurse with plenty of evidence to file a discrimination/whistleblower action against them. then.....the public will not care what their "magnet status" is......bc it will be brought forth publically how truly"un-interested" they are in public safety.bc actions speak louder than words. do you belong to your state nsg association? if not you need to.....it sounds like you'd be an excellent asset to their causes. :redlight:
  13. by   Daye
    mandatory over time

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