Maggots?

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    Oh my goodness- I hope to begin an LPN program this summer, (won't know for sure until after the interview on the 21st!). I know that I can handle the vomit, bowel movements, even gross smelly infections. Even blood and guts, I'm ready for all of that. But maggots and tapeworms? Just the thought makes me want to hurl! :imbar Did anyone else have these fears before becoming a nurse? I'm not an insect person, and I'm not sure that I could handle merely observing, much less removing worms from an individual! What is the grossest thing that I can expect? How often have most of you had to deal with patients with these "situations"? Any insight on your experiences or how you learned to handle it? Should I forget going into nursing if I feel this strongly about "bugs"? Thanks in advance for ANY advice.


    Feeling Naucious,
    Sandy
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    The use of maggots for debridement of wounds has been around for a while. Many more hospitals are begining to use them. I can see the order now, Fresh maggots to wound QD.
    Here is a site to help you learn more about the medicinal uses of maggots. http://www.ucihs.uci.edu/com/patholo...an/home_pg.htm

    As far as finding a pt infested with them, it is pretty creepy the first time, but as with most things you get used to it. I get the willies much more over body lice than I do maggotts, or even bugs in the ear.


    bob
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    Have been an RN for 17 years, did med-surg, ICU, geriatrics. Have yet to encounter either a maggot or a tapeworm in any clinical area. Leeches, yes, for wound care.

    Everyone has their creepy. Fortunately, not often.
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    Have you just read the grossest thing you ever saw post? Remember that these are the grossest things ever seen, not the everyday things seen. I would avoid the ED since thats where a lot of the bug stuff seems to happen (bugs in the ear, are one of the less unusual bug complaints.) I have not seen that many buggy patients- not even a weekly thing. I think you can safely enter nursing without worrying about being confronted with a ton of bugs. (now I have seen lots of bugs in the hospital, despite housekeepings efforts.) Good Luck on your interview!!!!!!!!!
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    Bugs in the ear, ick, I think I'd just pass out and have a heart attack on the spot if a bug flew in my ear! OK, you guys have given me a glimmer of hope that I'll never have to deal with the bug thing, hopefully. I didn't know how common it was or how often it happened.

    2ndCareerRn- thank you for the link, I'll check it out- maybe it'll give me some insight!

    MPHKatie- Thanks for the luck- I need it, I'm really nervous!

    Catlady- you've given me hope!
  9. 0
    you are going to great on the interview, just let us know how dazzling you were!!!! Be yourself and have fun... You are also evaluating the program, to see if it's up to your impeccable standards.
  10. 0
    i have had the pleasure and the pain of being a nurse for 20 years. one of the grossest theings i have seen was a teenager who came into er, in the middle of the summer, wearing a cast to his lower leg and complaining of itching and burning to the lateral aspect of his foot. we removed the cast and he had received an abrasion at the time of the broken foot. the wound was full of maggots. i composed myself a bit and cleaned the larvae from the wound. what i found underneath was the cleanest, healthiest wound i had seen in a while. i currently work in an ecu where we have our fair share of pressure ulcers, stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, etc. i personally would like to see modern medicine return to some of the tried and true methods of wound debridement. i have had the pleasure and the pain of being a nurse for 20 years. one of the grossest theings i have seen was a teenager who came into er, in the middle of the summer, wearing a cast to his lower leg and complaining of itching and burning to the lateral aspect of his foot. we removed the cast and he had received an abrasion at the time of the broken foot. the wound was full of maggots. i composed myself a bit and cleaned the larvae from the wound. what i found underneath was the cleanest, healthiest wound i had seen in a while. i currently work in an ecu where we have our fair share of pressure ulcers, stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, etc. i personally would like to see modern medicine return to some of the tried and true methods of wound debridement.
  11. 0
    i have had the pleasure and the pain of being a nurse for 20 years. one of the grossest theings i have seen was a teenager who came into er, in the middle of the summer, wearing a cast to his lower leg and complaining of itching and burning to the lateral aspect of his foot. we removed the cast and he had received an abrasion at the time of the broken foot. the wound was full of maggots. i composed myself a bit and cleaned the larvae from the wound. what i found underneath was the cleanest, healthiest wound i had seen in a while. i currently work in an ecu where we have our fair share of pressure ulcers, stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, etc. i personally would like to see modern medicine return to some of the tried and true methods of wound debridement.
  12. 0
    Sorry about the mess up and my double, even triple posting......I'm just trying to get this figured out....:-)
  13. 0
    Recently in Melbourne (Australia) a little boy who had had his cheek bitten off by a dog has had the section of the skin regrafted completely - He has some obvious scarring (visable on the TV report) raised and reddened area on the cheek - however my point of all this is that the surgeons used leechs to ensure that the blood flow would be kept up to the area - It was in our local newspapers - as well - I would have put in a link but not sure how to do that yet - He has really healed well
    Regards Tookie


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