LVN's without microscope experience?

  1. First let me say I am trying to understand the differences between the need for RN's vs LVN's (LPN's) in having courses that involve using microscopes. This is not an RN is better than LVN post, so please do not mistake my questions.

    In 2 of my classes this semester (microbiology and physiology) there are current LVN's who have never used a microscope before. They are working towards an ADN now. They also do not seem to have a great grasp of the basic bio 1 science info either which puts them at a disadvantage. We (3 of us who have taken many classes together and working towards varying RN degrees) are working with them and helping them along the way. Honestly their questions help us review basic info, so it helps us too.

    I am quite surprised that the LVN programs did not require any classes with microscopes . And I am kinda worried about nurses without basic bio science courses... as many of the nursing homes have LVN's providing most of the care with only one RN on the premises.

    It leads me to wonder why ? Why wouldn't LVN's need the knowledge of a bio class?

    This is just worrying me, but I am sure there must be a plausible explanation.

    Again, I am NOT trying to offend anyone, I've been wondering this for weeks.

    Thanks so much,

    MaryRose
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Does an LVN or RN need to use a microscope on the job?

    Would knowledge of how to use a microcope allow them to care for their patients better?

    I'd be far more worried with an LVN or RN without Pharmacology, etc, then the basic "this is the course adjustment knob."

    And as you said, this is not to be offensive. IMHO, I really think that many of the basic courses are just to line college's pocketbooks, not to help the person become a better nurse.
  4. by   RedSox33RN
    I know for me, in an ADN program, I hadn't used a microscope in YEARS. The last time I had was in Chemistry and Biology in HS- many, many moons ago! LOL

    Since I took A&P1 online, I looked at pictures of slides and didn't use a microscope. Now that I'm in A&P2 in a regular classroom, we are using microscopes, and most of it has come back to me, though with a few quick pointers from the instructor.

    Maybe your classmates are in the same boat, and just haven't used a microscope in a long time. I'm not sure, but don't LPN programs require the same basic sciences as RN programs? Like Chem and Bio from HS? If so, that's my excuse - I'm just too damn old to have remembered! LOL
  5. by   Maxs
    well, basically a microscope is used to understand the physiology of organelles or microorganisms that are invinsible to the naked eye. For most nursing degrees, you need your associates/Bachellors in applied/minor in science. So, if your going towards a degree, minor in anything, your obligated to take at least 20 Semester hours (associate) of science and at least 35-40 SH (first two years) credit hours in science for your bachellors. Taking these science courses assures that your fullfiling the curriculum for applied science. They may enhance your ability to learn new things (science) and in nursing courses. Nurses have to apply theirselves scientifically and this is the way. Some of the things you learn there. They are important towards nursing even though, the courses come heavely loaded with etc. For example, you learn your drug calculations from chemistry (foundation) and infection control from microbiology. The rest of the stuff in microbiology is sent to the lab, and maybe they teach RN's about what the lab techs do in microbiology because they don't want them looking stupid, in terms of asking them all these basic questions. After all you have an associate's degree, that's what it means in plain english.
  6. by   bobnurse
    Most LVN courses are done at a vo-tech school where they do not take college level biology courses with labs..........So no need for a microscope.........

    They are now advancing there careers and a pre-req is to take multiple biology courses with labs (micro, A&P, Chemistry).........

    LVN's at one time used to be clinical in nature, and the RN's had more theory in their classes.........This is why they say a LVN out of school is more clinically experienced then a RN, but the RN has more book smarts.

    LVN's basically learn "How to do" and the RN learns "why you do".
  7. by   MryRose
    Quote from bobnurse
    LVN's basically learn "How to do" and the RN learns "why you do".

    I guess I never thought of it that way. I thought the vo tech school also had the science stuff.... but looking at it this way it makes sense.

    I've always been the "why" girl...lol... wanting to know the logic behind an explanation so I guess it's a good thing that I am going the for the RN degree.

    My Anatomy Prof was always explaining the phys portions to me because I needed to know "why" it did this , or that...lol. I now have her for Phys and when we get to a subject that I "bugged" her about, she always smiles at me ...lolol and we get a giggle out if it.:chuckle

    It just makes more sense to me to understand why things happen than to just accept that they do...... I know.... I drive people nuts! lol

    Hugs!
    MaryRose
  8. by   MryRose
    Quote from fun2care
    does an lvn or rn need to use a microscope on the job?

    i guess that is what i was asking...... do only rn's use them if at all??

    would knowledge of how to use a microcope allow them to care for their patients better?

    that is another question i have too. does having that knowledge (microorganism response etc..) help you better take careof your patients?

    i'd be far more worried with an lvn or rn without pharmacology, etc, then the basic "this is the course adjustment knob."

    i was not talking about the actual usage of the microscope.... sorry i wasn't very clear on that lol..... but the whole course in microorganisms and function.

    and as you said, this is not to be offensive. imho, i really think that many of the basic courses are just to line college's pocketbooks, not to help the person become a better nurse.
    thanks for your response, i appreciate it very much. i too wonder about some of the classes that are required.... poly sci is a good example for me!
  9. by   MryRose
    Quote from Maxs
    well, basically a microscope is used to understand the physiology of organelles or microorganisms that are invinsible to the naked eye. For most nursing degrees, you need your associates/Bachellors in applied/minor in science. So, if your going towards a degree, minor in anything, your obligated to take at least 20 Semester hours (associate) of science and at least 35-40 SH (first two years) credit hours in science for your bachellors. Taking these science courses assures that your fullfiling the curriculum for applied science. They may enhance your ability to learn new things (science) and in nursing courses. Nurses have to apply theirselves scientifically and this is the way. Some of the things you learn there. They are important towards nursing even though, the courses come heavely loaded with etc. For example, you learn your drug calculations from chemistry (foundation) and infection control from microbiology. The rest of the stuff in microbiology is sent to the lab, and maybe they teach RN's about what the lab techs do in microbiology because they don't want them looking stupid, in terms of asking them all these basic questions. After all you have an associate's degree, that's what it means in plain english.
    Thanks Maxs, I'm thinking all the science classes I take now and in the future will help me do my best. I guess it helps that I really like it, but I know I am undoubtedly ask some stupid questions anyway! lol
  10. by   CA CoCoRN
    Quote from Fun2Care
    Does an LVN or RN need to use a microscope on the job?

    Would knowledge of how to use a microcope allow them to care for their patients better?

    I'd be far more worried with an LVN or RN without Pharmacology, etc, then the basic "this is the course adjustment knob."

    And as you said, this is not to be offensive. IMHO, I really think that many of the basic courses are just to line college's pocketbooks, not to help the person become a better nurse.

    Yes. I use one daily in L&D to detect the presence of ferning, a process which occurs in dried amniotic fluid.

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