LVN to RN or Straight to RN?

  1. 0 Hi, I am sure this is a question that has been asked before, but I need to ask it again. My ultimate goal is to be an RN, but I am not sure of my best option. Should I enroll in a LVN program and then apply for the bridge to RN or just do the prerequisites and apply to a community college program for the Associate in Nursing program? I would want to finish all my prerequsites at a community college anyways since I want to be licensed to practice outside of California. I would appreciate all advice. Thank you.
  2. Visit  np224 profile page

    About np224

    Joined Jun '07; Posts: 1.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  RNforLongTime profile page
    0
    I would go straight for your RN degree. I've got nothing against LVN/LPN's but imho, you'll have more options available to you as an RN. Good luck!
  4. Visit  preciousbaby621 profile page
    0
    I would go straight for RN. There's alot more jobs for RN than for lvn, well in my area. That's just my opinion. I was about start a LVN program at a school, but it would cost $8,000 upfront, for 13 months. I decided to just go to a community college, where it's easier to get financial aid. I heard that LVN course is harder than RN because they have to learn so much in one year. You decide.

    Best of Luck!!!!
  5. Visit  MJHarper profile page
    0
    For some people it is easier for them to get their LPN/LVN first and then bridge over to get their RN and for some they can get through the RN program the first time. The RN program is hard I am not going to kid you about that.
    Personally, I tried getting my RN first and made it through the core classes and through the first semester (Fundamental of Nursing etc..) , but when we hit Med/Surg I (Care of Adult I) it got me. I am now a LPN and working full time to get some experience, but will be returning in the near future to get my RN and will bridge over to the RN program at a local college and it will only take me a year to complete the RN program.
    Should you decide to take practical nursing first and get your LPN, you could then go through the LPN to RN bridge program at your local college which will only take you a year to get your RN. Good luck in whatever you decide to do.
  6. Visit  pagandeva2000 profile page
    0
    Most people seem to make this decision based on how quickly they can be accepted into a specific program. I hear that many of the RN programs have as long as a 5 year waiting list, and some say that the LPN programs are a bit quicker (then, there are others that are saying the same...a long waiting list). If you want to become an RN, and have good grades in the pre-requisites, then, place in for candidacy to see what happens. If not, then, try an LPN program while you are waiting. It is really up to you. Best of luck!
  7. Visit  ann945n profile page
    0
    Apply to both programs and take which ever you get accepted to. Increase your changes as much as you can, chances are you will have a long hard application road ahead of you, i dont know anyone who wasnt on a wait list of did multiple rounds of applications
  8. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    I did the LPN then ADN (RN) because of my husband's frequent moves with the military. If I had the choice, I would certainly have gone straight for the BSN.
  9. Visit  shock-me-sane profile page
    0
    I vote straight for the RN because I am biased because that is what I am doing. Also, I wanted to recommend that you not just look to limit yourself to community colleges. What I mean is that you may have to wait a lot longer to get into a program. I originally was going to go the cc route, but heard that the wait list was 2-3 years (I am in southern california). So I ended up applying to a cal state and got in right away as they don't maintain a waiting list.

    good luck!
  10. Visit  youknowho profile page
    0
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Most people seem to make this decision based on how quickly they can be accepted into a specific program. I hear that many of the RN programs have as long as a 5 year waiting list, and some say that the LPN programs are a bit quicker (then, there are others that are saying the same...a long waiting list). If you want to become an RN, and have good grades in the pre-requisites, then, place in for candidacy to see what happens. If not, then, try an LPN program while you are waiting. It is really up to you. Best of luck!
    I second the go straight to BSN thought.
    However.... I have heard from some friends wanting to go into nursing how horribly impacted the RN schools are, especially the ADN programs since they are typically the ones at community colleges and cost less.
    Some are doing a private LVN program first. Costs lots but they can get in right away, no wait and be done in about 12-18 months. It seams easier getting your RN from an LVN.
    If you are patient and can afford not to work for a few years, then look into BSN programs. I got into the nursing program at SJSU on the first try. If you have good grades, test scores, its very possible to not have to wait at all after your prereqs. Good luck!
  11. Visit  WoosahRN profile page
    0
    In most of the Associate RN programs you are eligible to test for your LPN after the first two blocks. I just graduated from an RN program but tested for my LPN half way through so I could start working and gaining experience. Plus the jump from CNA pay was a huge incentive. Win win.

    I wouldn't do the seperate LPN program since you will have a pause in the middle to have to apply and restart in an RN program. Plus sometimes the tech schools and LPN programs have a longer wait than some RN programs (at least here in AZ-there was a year and a half wait for a year long LPN program and a one semester wait for RN program, duh).
  12. Visit  HeartJulz profile page
    0
    In my opinion, if you dont have any prior healthcare background experience, go the LVN route. This way you slowly start out and make sure you really want to do nursing. I think nursing is more than helping others... it also has to fit who you are. If you like challenge, dont mind being on your feet 12 + hours at a time, love to work ... blah blah... Ive also known some who go through Rn then change their mind after a year ... so go the LVN route... you get a chance to also learn 'bedside' manner , how to interact w pts and so forth... really, there is a LOT that goes into nursing. When your clinicals come around you will have ample hands on exp. and by the time you finish your LVN program you will def. know if this is the right path for you and then just bridge over the 8-12mt to RN.
  13. Visit  Lisa CCU RN profile page
    0
    Quote from ann945n
    Apply to both programs and take which ever you get accepted to. Increase your changes as much as you can, chances are you will have a long hard application road ahead of you, i dont know anyone who wasnt on a wait list of did multiple rounds of applications
    It's not true that all nursing schools have long waiting lists. In my area, it was actually a lot harder to get into LPN school because 200+ people applied for 24 spots and I still don't get how they picked those people; I really think you had to know someone because the only person I know who got in KNEW someone.

    I got into nursing school first try and none of the BSN programs I know of have waiting lists. Actually I only heard of one here and it was an ASN program and they just went to a points system I believe. Actually, the other ASN did the points system too.
    Last edit by Lisa CCU RN on Jun 20, '07
  14. Visit  pagandeva2000 profile page
    0
    I have heard that it is easier to get into the BSN programs than it is to the Associate Degree nursing programs. Each area has their own challenges, I suppose.


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