LPN's are Nurses Too? Aren't they? - page 5

Hi, This is my first post. I received my letter Monday accepting me into the LPN program at a school 40 miles away. I am sooo excited that I am telling everyone. But, when I tell them it is for... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Sweet, red sangria on the rocks, please.
    gotcha your back, helllloooooo!
  2. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from justjenn
    Hi, This is my first post. I received my letter Monday accepting me into the LPN program at a school 40 miles away. I am sooo excited that I am telling everyone. But, when I tell them it is for LPN, they all get this look on their face, like disappointment. I am finding out that most people do not think of LPN's as real nurses. This is troubling to me. I am proud and worked hard to make it this far. Can someone explain this to me?

    I applied to 3 schools and have been on waiting lists for sooo long, that it took over a year to get in. The RN waiting lists are 2 1/2 yrs long. One reason for the shortage of nurses, is because there isn't enough room for people to get in.

    I hope I will do well and make a difference in people's lives.

    Jenn
    "No one can make you feel inferior without your permission" and...."There are no victims-only volunteers" Now that I got those trite cliches out of the way I'll add-yes-I am a nurse....Yes-my scope of practice is limited and the LPN program is a great way to make a decent living while you continue your education if you so desire....
  3. by   Tammy9
    I have no idea if this post is still open but I just had to say something. I read all the post about LPN and RN. How I decided to take the LPN course was I wanted to work with people. I love people. RN's tend to have alot of management duties. Not that they don't help on the floor that is not what I am saying. I just wanted to be close to patients as I could. And LPN's are always there. We are a TEAM RN's and LPN's. When someone asks me why aren't you going right on to getting your RN this is what I tell them. Just an example if you want to use it. I do intend on getting my RN later on but I really want the experince of an LPN first. And I started at the bottom CNA on to LPN and one day RN. Don't let anyone still your dream or your thunder.
  4. by   lpn3324
    Just to amuse you....when people ask my husband what an LPN is he replies"lowest paid nurse". After hearing so much talk about the nursing shortage in Florida we feel if they paid us better,and gave us more respect more of us would be back in the field working
  5. by   GreenWitch
    I LOVE that! I'm going to pass it on to ALL my friends! Thanks for sharing that!!

    Quote from lpn3324
    Just to amuse you....when people ask my husband what an LPN is he replies"lowest paid nurse". After hearing so much talk about the nursing shortage in Florida we feel if they paid us better,and gave us more respect more of us would be back in the field working
  6. by   military girl
    As a RN who just completed her BSN(I was a ADN that graduated in 2000), I am the nurse I am today because I was a LPN first. Many people think that LPNs are "Lower Paid Nurses" and at the time when I was a LPN that statement really hurt. I know many LPNs that have better critical thinking skills than some of the RNs that I know.
    Don't let other people rain on your parade. Go to LPN school. It was the best decision that I could have personally made. I could not imagine coming out of RN school and working in the ER without having some nursing experience under my belt. Go for it!!!
    ADN to BSN 2004(Yeah Baby!!!!!)






    Quote from justjenn
    Hi, This is my first post. I received my letter Monday accepting me into the LPN program at a school 40 miles away. I am sooo excited that I am telling everyone. But, when I tell them it is for LPN, they all get this look on their face, like disappointment. I am finding out that most people do not think of LPN's as real nurses. This is troubling to me. I am proud and worked hard to make it this far. Can someone explain this to me?

    I applied to 3 schools and have been on waiting lists for sooo long, that it took over a year to get in. The RN waiting lists are 2 1/2 yrs long. One reason for the shortage of nurses, is because there isn't enough room for people to get in.

    I hope I will do well and make a difference in people's lives.

    Jenn
  7. by   apaisRN
    The only reason I'd tell someone not to be an LPN is that you get screwed in terms of pay. The LPNs at my hospital do the same work as RNs, minus pushing meds and spiking blood, and make a pitiful amount. I can't see doing it as any more than a stepping stone, when you can go back for a year and make so much more.

    I was lucky my family could finance my BSN. If you can manage that first, it's great to have the darn degree and be done.
  8. by   jenac
    Quote from esselmulen
    A good nurse is a good nurse no matter what her/his title.
    Beautifully said!
  9. by   lpnger
    congratulations,you go for it , lpns are real nurses .....
  10. by   apaisRN
    Quote from military girl
    Many people think that LPNs are "Lower Paid Nurses" and at the time when I was a LPN that statement really hurt.
    Just wanted to say - from me, at least, it isn't meant to hurt. It's kind of a sarcastic comment on the fact that LPNs do work hard, have extensive knowledge, and don't get paid adequately for it. While I think LPNs are exploited, at least in my hospital, I know many who are superb nurses and taught me well.

    In fact, when I started on a general surg floor as a new grad (BSN) I also started with a new ADN grad and a new LPN, both of whom came from the same 1+1 program. I'd never seen an NG, and these girls had had clinical experience in which they got to be charge of the unit! The LPN was several steps ahead of me in terms of being ready to work the floor. I was supposed to be her "resource," I guess that means supervising RN, but what that meant was we had our own assigments and I pushed her morphine and zofran, of which there was a lot on a surgical floor. Sometimes I was even assigned to be "resource" for an LPN who'd been there twenty years. It was hilarious - I was asking her to show me how to flush a Foley and I was supposed to be supervising her.
  11. by   Nurse Berta
    I was an LPN for 10 years before I eventually got an ADN, BSN, MSN. I really learned how to be a nurse in LPN training. I was really proud to be an LPN. Eventually, I taught in an LPN program. I chose that over the AD or BSN programs to teach in, because in my heart, I will always be an LPN. Be proud of who you are. Stand up for your profession! YOU ARE A NURSE!
  12. by   opalmRN
    Quote from justjenn
    But, when I tell them it is for LPN, they all get this look on their face, like disappointment. I am finding out that most people do not think of LPN's as real nurses. Jenn
    It never ceases to amaze me how may people run into this ATTITUDE.

    If you were to say you wanted to teach elementary school would they say you were not a real teacher because you were not teaching at the college level? Of course not but it seems that some folks have this misconception about the responsibilities of LPNs

    If LPNs are not (in their minds) real nurses, what does the "N" in LPN stand for? Naughty or Nice? NOT!

    Thank these folks for their opinions but don't let THEIR'S become YOURS!
  13. by   Autumndove
    Hi all,

    I agree there is a real lack of information about LPNs and their role in nursing. I'm a first year nursing student for the ADN degree and so far in my nurse 1 & 2 classes, they've yet to talk about LPNs. What drew me to this site was when we got a test question on what to do when a Physician wants to give an order over the phone and the LPN answered. The possible answers to choose from were a) get the nurse b) tell the physician to call back later c) take the order and repeat the order to verify you have the information down correct. I chose (c) but I'm thinking I got this wrong, since in the text books, it says to get the RN.

    My whole confusion on this topic was that I thought LPNs were nurses and I didn't really see anything wrong with them taking an order over the phone as long as it was taken correctly. I was also fustrated to see that in my nursing text book there really wasn't much of a mention about LPNs and their roles and responsibilities.

    -Autumn

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