LPN vs. RN (school)

  1. First off this is not a debate. I am trying to figure out if LPN or RN school is best for me. Anyone care to help me out? I went to LPN school over the Summer and took my pre-req's. I was supposed to start back in August and go straight through until December of 2007 when I should of graduated. Well, because of financial problems I couldn't start in August and waited until the January 07 class. To sum it up I have about 16 months left of full time LPN school starting January. I could later switch to RN. Ok RN school- I need to take the state test, get a high enough score to get into college and after all my pre-req's there I would then apply for RN school somehwere else. There's no straight through RN programs around here only colleges that offer pre-nursing courses, unless I drive out of state to one. (an hour away) The RN school in the area is supposedly extremely competitive and hard as heck to get into. They like to take mostly straight A students and minorities. (men,african american,etc.) So since I am not a minority and not a straight A student i'm scared i'll be setting myself up for a let down. I don't want to have to wait for years to get into clinicals. It kind of sounds like a no brainer at this point but the reason i'm thinking of RN is because of my personal life stress. I have two young daughters that need full time daycare. (ages, 3 in November & 17 months) Full time daycare is the reason I couldn't go back in August. The money just wasn't there. I also have a pretty bad case of Crohn's disease at the moment. Since 2004 I have had flare ups with it and now my whole right side is inflamed. I haven't been responding to any pills they put me on. (16/day) I am on self shots now and *hoping* to get better finally. If I am better by January I wanted to continue school. But now I wonder if RN school would be easier at first. The first couple of years I would be doing nothing but pre-nursing courses so I shouldn't be in school full-time yet. That way I might get by with half day childcare or something like that. (cheaper) It might also be less intense and therefore less stress on my body. And since my ultimate goal is to be an RN anyways, this would lead me straight through. I don't have much support from my family about going to school right now especially RN school. My Dad thinks it's crazy and I should stick with LPN school since they make it so hard around here to be an RN. They also think I should wait longer until the kids are in school and I am completely well. I know health comes first and it does, i'm just being very optimistic and hoping i'll be better by next year. So, does it sound like LPN or RN school would be the way to go for me? Women with children in general, is RN school harder to complete? I know 16 months isn't long to squish so much knowledge so it's pretty fast track and intense. I can't help but wonder if RN school is just as intense if not worse? More pressure for better grades etc. Ok opinions please. TIA!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   CARLRAYE
    hi,
    I am an LPN-I am a casemanager nurse in a hospital-I also worked on medsurg floor for 8yrs @ this hospital-I do the same thing my peers do except iv push meds and charge-they make alot more than me.I wish I would of gotten my RN first-because of this.I got my lpn in a vocational school-now i would like to go for my rn but i have to start from scratch-they donot accept any of my lpn credits.....this is horrible.
  4. by   Mama2girls
    Thanks for replying! I can't believe they don't accept your LPN credits. Have you looked online? I know you can switch from LPN-RN online. Hopefully you can find something I would hate to have to start from scratch.
  5. by   Aradien
    Hi ,

    I am currently in an RN program for two reasons: (1) it is less exensive than the LPN program (roughly $6,000 for two years, RN or $15,000 for one year, LPN). The impression that I get from the LPN's in the area I live is that their program is much more intense. It is shorter in duration but they pack a lot of information in that one year. The LPN students really go to school 40 hours/week; very stressful (2) it is closer to getting a BSN. If you get your LPN then you have to bridge to RN then bridge to BSN, if you want your BSN.

    I had a lab partner who had recently graduated from an LPN program and when I asked her why she was going for her RN, she said that the pay and jobs were better. I also asked why she just didn't go for her RN and she said she wanted to start working as a nurse as fast as she could and that LPN was the fastest route.

    That being said, you have to do what you have to do and I wish you the best of luck.

    Aradien
  6. by   Jennerizer
    Another advantage of the RN program is that after third semester - you are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-LPN exam. If you pass it - you can work as an LPN while still finishing up your 4th semester of the RN program & while waiting to take the NCLEX-RN exam. At least that's how it is where I went to school a couple of years ago.

    You have to figure out what works best for you. As an RN you will make more money & have more jobs to choose from - that's a given. I haven't ever taken any of the LPN courses, so I can't answer which is more difficult.
  7. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Mama2girls
    The RN school in the area is supposedly extremely competitive and hard as heck to get into. They like to take mostly straight A students and minorities. (men,african american,etc.) So since I am not a minority and not a straight A student i'm scared i'll be setting myself up for a let down.
    You make these statements as if minorities are being blankly accepted into this particular nursing program with no qualifications.

    I'm a minority and have always earned my place in life with good test scores, good grades, and hard work. I attribute my triumphs to personal merit, not affirmative action. Please stop believing in the hideous myth that all minorities are being accepted into institutions of higher learning without the proper qualifications.
  8. by   Mama2girls
    I should of known someone would have gotten offended by the simple word "minority." Sorry to burst your bubble, but around here, that alone is a d*mn good qualification. I was mainly talking about the men, but didn't want to put them in a specific catagory. Since there aren't near as many male nurses, that is what RN schools love to take. Am I saying they can get in with a 1.6 GPA? NO. I never said "minorities are stupid and good thing that's what they are or they wouldn't have a chance." All i'm trying to say is you have 200 people with the same qualifications, GPA, etc. 50 of them are minorities. Those 50 have a better chance already. Pick my thread apart all you want, I know what I meant. Unfortunately I was looking for good advice, not a debate on a totally different topic.

    -Wanted to point out how you took your time to try to make me look bad, instead of just answering my question in the first place. Kinda rude huh.
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Mama2girls
    Wanted to point out how you took your time to try to make me look bad, instead of just answering my question in the first place. Kinda rude huh.
    I possess absolutely no obligation to answer your question. Threads are capable of receiving a wide myriad of responses including answers, comments, etc.

    Additionally, I didn't attempt to cause you to look bad. It is your choice to interpret my previous post as 'rude'.

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