LPN to RN through testing?

  1. I just feel that I'm going to get a lot of flak on this, but here goes...Since there's such a nursing shortage, why not let LPN's take the RN test with some parameters? I just thought of a few:
    5 years minimum experience
    letter of recommendation from supervisor
    must be IV certified ahead of time
    More?
    They would take the same test, study from the same study guides that are available. If someone felt especially weak in say, med conversions, they could take an algebra review or brush upon on what they learned in school beforehand.
    If they didn't pass, well, do what the other students do and try, try again.
    You're not going to pass the test if you're not up on the latest information, and it would happen whether or not you were an RN or LPN or BSN or MSN for that matter!

    I just think it makes sense in light of the nursing shortage. There won't be a tremendously long wait to get into an LPN-RN school. It would make a hugh difference in patient care. It would also help to keep jobs from being filled from overseas workers. We really should try to hire citizens first, anyway. It seems the RN organizations would be diametrically opposed, but I don't understand why. After all, they are the ones that are crying the most about a nursing shortage and demanding action.
    And, BTW, why don't state nursing organizations allow LPN's to joint?? They are nurses, right???


    Just a thought..
    mc3
    Kind of simplistic, I know, but I've always wondered about it...
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  2. 85 Comments

  3. by   HuggyPuglet
    Intriguing idea.

    I've always wished that the old 'diploma' programs would return. Twofold benefits...hospitals get nurses (that will likely stay on after graduation if the working conditions are good and benefits are reasonable) and nurses (new students and LPNs alike) get a chance to advance while on the job. Educational costs could be defrayed on a tuition assistance for hours worked basis.

    I know someone will come along and find all sorts of fault with this approach too, but like you, I'm just voicing my thoughts.
  4. by   futurecnm
    I'm sure there are schooling and credit requirements that you must have to become an RN. I have no clue what LPN schooling is like, do you also focus on the nursing process and care plans the same as RN schooling does??? I would think there is some content that is required for you to have that isn't covered in LPN school. Just my thoughts....
  5. by   Gods child
    I don't think there should be any shortcuts to becoming an RN. In the time it would take to get the five years experience as an LPN one could have already completed an LPN-RN program. However, I do think that employers paying for LPN-RN bridge programs are a great idea. And remember, there is no nursing shortage...

    This is like a Dental Assistant wishing to become a Dental Hygienist if she studies real hard and passes the test (because after all they do a lot of the same things). But in reality the formal education is what separates the two professions. I can see where you are coming from so I hope you don't take this the wrong way.
  6. by   Fiona59
    PN school is intense and yes we learnt to write careplans and understand and implement the nursing process. My college also included a course on human resource managment and supervisory skills.

    Programmes vary from area to area, with the main goal being having a class that can pass the national exam. Our practice of skills is restricted by the province we work in and even by which hospital group we work for. So even though I was trained how to start an IV, prepare and administer IV meds, the hospital I work for has made it an RN (and specialized RN at that) skill.
  7. by   TazziRN
    Question: do LVNs who graduate from a community college come out with an AS degree?
  8. by   moongirl
    Quote from TazziRN
    Question: do LVNs who graduate from a community college come out with an AS degree?
    At my school, no they dont. The RN is an A.S. degree, the LPN is conisdered a " Professional/Techincal" course and the pre reqs are different for the two programs.

    At my school for LPN only Human Biology is required, whereas for RN it is A&P for a full year. the Math requirement is less, as is the English requirement
  9. by   TazziRN
    Quote from moongirl
    At my school, no they dont. The RN is an A.S. degree, the LPN is conisdered a " Professional/Techincal" course and the pre reqs are different for the two programs.

    At my school for LPN only Human Biology is required, whereas for RN it is A&P for a full year. the Math requirement is less, as is the English requirement
    I didn't think so, I just wondered.
  10. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from TazziRN
    Question: do LVNs who graduate from a community college come out with an AS degree?
    I know many LVNs who received AS degrees in vocational/practical nursing after completing the required 60 units of coursework at community colleges. Most LPNs/LVNs opt to not get the AS degree because it will add 6 months to 1 year onto their schooling.

    I am an LVN and would not want to take a test to become an RN. I'd rather learn something new by enrolling in an LVN-to-RN bridge program. There is an old saying: "You don't know what you don't know."
  11. by   smk1
    I think that if you are going to be held to a higher standard of care legally then you need/want the education to support that. I would like to see all LPN programs have transferable A&P credits so that it is easy to go back and finish the extra prereq classes (micro, nutrition, chem etc...) and matriculate into the final RN year. I don't think a BSN with 5 years experience should be able to study and test for the NP license. Same situation.
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    Although I dont think this is quite the answer . I do think it should be easier to get in to a LVN to RN program. The slots for LVN's are few in the schools in the DFW area. You may be competing with 75 applicants for 10 slots in a LVN to RN program here. I think they should have an accelerated program for LVN's but not by-passing any of the nursing courses but cutting back on the other class requirments. How about cutting this PE class I had to take. I have been a alzheimers nurse and I have 5 kids .. I have already completed my PE course. I had to take a humanities course.. so I took theater, well I have two teens I have mastered drama and acting. Enough being funny..lol I think if we had some type of accelerated program we should have to take our sciences, a psych class, nursing math and maybe a english. Something along these lines . People with no nursing history get accepted into accelerated BSN programs everyday. They spend 15 or so months in nursing school and they are out. Why cant we as nurses that have X amount of experience have something that would allow us to accelerate through nursing school. I am by no way slamming the Accelerated BSN programs, because I think they are a good opportunity. I always feel like LVN's are not really fully considered when it comes to moving up the nursing educational ladder.




    Quote from mc3
    I just feel that I'm going to get a lot of flak on this, but here goes...Since there's such a nursing shortage, why not let LPN's take the RN test with some parameters? I just thought of a few:
    5 years minimum experience
    letter of recommendation from supervisor
    must be IV certified ahead of time
    More?
    They would take the same test, study from the same study guides that are available. If someone felt especially weak in say, med conversions, they could take an algebra review or brush upon on what they learned in school beforehand.
    If they didn't pass, well, do what the other students do and try, try again.
    You're not going to pass the test if you're not up on the latest information, and it would happen whether or not you were an RN or LPN or BSN or MSN for that matter!

    I just think it makes sense in light of the nursing shortage. There won't be a tremendously long wait to get into an LPN-RN school. It would make a hugh difference in patient care. It would also help to keep jobs from being filled from overseas workers. We really should try to hire citizens first, anyway. It seems the RN organizations would be diametrically opposed, but I don't understand why. After all, they are the ones that are crying the most about a nursing shortage and demanding action.
    And, BTW, why don't state nursing organizations allow LPN's to joint?? They are nurses, right???


    Just a thought..
    mc3
    Kind of simplistic, I know, but I've always wondered about it...
  13. by   Gods child
    Accelerated programs aren't trying to bypass continuing education by "testing out of" anything. I know of several people who have completed an LPN-RN bridge program in about 15 months (or less).
  14. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Gods child
    I know of several people who have completed an LPN-RN bridge program in about 15 months (or less).
    The local LPN-to-RN bridge programs in this area are typically 1 year in length, but the major catch is a whole slew of prerequisite classes before entry. One program requires 42 prerequisite credit hours before you can enter their program. A local LVN-to-BSN program requires 64 credit hours of prerequisites before you'll be considered for admission.

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