LPN to RN through testing? - page 6

I just feel that I'm going to get a lot of flak on this, but here goes...Since there's such a nursing shortage, why not let LPN's take the RN test with some parameters? I just thought of a few: 5... Read More

  1. by   mkcrturner
    Quote from mkcrturner
    ...... they wouldn't even allow me to transfer high school Biology since it had been over ten years ago. They said "we like to see the classes taken recently so they are fresh." Now Biology isn't even required, they want Micro. GRRRR
    ..........<sigh>
    Oops, couldnt edit.
    to clarify- The reason i was upset with this is that I felt it was a waste of $1400 to take BIO, I felt ready to take the A&P without their pre-reg of BIO. If I had failed A&P due to lack of BIO knowledge...that would have been my fault. I realize the concept of pre-req's to build/prepare for other courses. But I was and am well versed in BIO
  2. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    Quote from dotherightthing
    I'm in favor of a "transition" from LPN to RN. LPNs shouldn't just test and then walk into the RN position, though some probably could. It wouldn't give the process enough standardization. However, a transition that includes testing, knowledge base, experience and additional formal education and training would make it a standardized transition. Every LPN could not acheive this, I think we would all be surprised at the smaller number who could actually make this transition and then we likely wouldn't have as much opposition to it. At this time, however, the current process is so expensive and time consuming that's it a real barrier for working LPNs who rely on their salary to support themselves and their families. Keep an open mind, this is something that could work.

    I totally agree. I just wrote in my journal about this very subject. If I take a Nutrition mini-mester in Dec, I will be able to apply to 2 transitional programs in Jan (they start in May). I will feel better having apps in more than one school. The problem is #2 school is full-time (at least summer classes are). My question is why would a transitional program be full-time? Surely they realize that if we are ALREADY nurses, we are probably WORKING somewhere. I understand that they "discourage" working too many hours, but I still need food and shelter during school. I have many years of Med-Surg experience and have managed to do pre-req's while working full-time (while maintaining a high GPA). It will be hard going to school, working full-time, keeping my sanity, studying, and not ignoring my family BUT it is only a year. I know I can do it. It would be nice if the programs were more working-LVN friendly.

    Oh yea, don't even get me started on all the different pre-req's required by the colleges...
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN34TX
    It really makes me cringe to see LPN/LVN to RN students getting clinicals on med/surg units spending their time showing their instructor that they know how to draw up insulin correctly or some other skill very basic to most any LPN/LVN when that time could be better spent in an area less familiar to the LPN to RN student and they could really learn something new from a clinical standpoint.

    Most of the things that LPN/LVN's aren't allowed to do in practice are things that they never let the RN students do in the first place like IV push meds and hanging blood.

    So why even have these LPN/LVN to RN students doing clinicals on these types of floors in the first place? What exactly is the purpose here?
    Making beds? Giving PO meds? Drawing up insulin?
    Quote from Tweety
    The LPN to RN programs here strive to give them unique experiences in L&D, ER, ICU, etc. and steer away from general med surg floors.
    My program does the same. I wonder if it also depends upon the area. If the school has a lot of hospital clinical sites to choose from then, I think LVN's get a lot more exposure to different areas. If the school doesn't have access to as many clinical sites ... there's probably less opportunities.

    Just as an example: at our last clinical site for 4th semester, we were supposed to do advanced med surg so ... we were able to work on many specialty floors like oncology, ortho, neuro, liver/pancreas, etc.

    I realize that you can also get some of these patients on any med surg floor but, in smaller hospitals it usually was only occassionally. Cancer patients, for example, were very rare in the small hospitals because they usually are treated elsewhere.

    But at this hospital, there was a large oncology floor, and the instructors made a point of assigning us these patients because we were studying this and other speciality areas at school. I know the LVN in my clinical group really enjoyed it because, she's an ER nurse and hadn't been on an oncology floor before.

    Also ... I'm really surprized if RN students aren't allowed to do things like IV pushes and hang blood, because we've been doing that since 3rd semester. The LVN in my group, for example, was hanging blood all day yesterday.

    Technically ... LVN's can hang blood in California under their license but some hospitals limit it to RN's only so, it's been great practice for the LVN's in the program ... especially the LVN's who don't work in acute care and haven't done IV pushes, blood, etc. before.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 8, '06
  4. by   mc3
    Thank you, dotherightthing, you were more concise than I was able to be.
    I'm getting a sense of "well, if I had to do it, so do you" from some of the posts here. That's the same kind of logic that's still pervasive in nursing today where nurses "eat their young"; they had to "suffer" so others have to "suffer".
    Also, I keep saying, if you don't know the theories by studying, you wouldn't pass the NCLEX, right?
    And, BTW, I am an LPN and HAPPY right where I am in Hospice! I'm proud of the fact that I'm teaching my team partner (an RN) all about hospice. We've helped each other tremendously. However, I have no intention of taking my education any further - never had - for a lot of reasons, mainly my age and the fact that I'm very happy where I'm at in life...
    Like I've said, I was just wondering...
    mc3
  5. by   RN34TX
    Quote from lizz
    My program does the same. I wonder if it also depends upon the area. If the school has a lot of hospital clinical sites to choose from then, I think LVN's get a lot more exposure to different areas. If the school doesn't have access to as many clinical sites ... there's probably less opportunities.
    That's probably true.
    Although it was my med/surg days in large cities like Dallas where I saw this taking place, some schools still may have limited sites to choose from regardless of size I guess, with competition for clinical sites from other schools in the area.


    so ... I'm really surprized if RN students aren't allowed to do things like IV pushes and hang blood, because we've been doing that since 3rd semester. The LVN in my group, for example, was hanging blood all day yesterday.
    That's how I think it should be in TX as well.
    If you are going to be hanging blood and pushing meds as a new RN, the best way to get started is under a watchful eye of a clinical instructor, not after you graduate.
  6. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Tweety
    I see your point. But not all LPNs are coming from a hospital background. Many are in LTC or elsewhere. Also, they just have to prove competency. When I orient new hires, I still am expected to follow them when they pass their meds and do their assessments and check off an orientation sheet that they are competent, no matter how many years they have been doing nursing.
    True.
    But this competency assurance could be done in a lab station setting and expedited a little faster to give these students more of what they don't already have a background in.
    To those students who struggled or didn't do so well in the lab stations due to limited med/surg experience, etc. then it's off to a med/surg rotation for you.
    For those who flew through the lab stations with no problem, then it's time to keep going to to other areas less familiar to them.

    I'm sure it can't be quite that easy but it could be better at least at the schools I have familiarity with.

    The LPN to RN programs here strive to give them unique experiences in L&D, ER, ICU, etc. and steer away from general med surg floors......Obviously there are going to be plenty of LPN's that aren't going to learn anything new because they know so much. But it's not all redundant. Just as I'm learning a lot in my RN to BSN courses in assessment, patho. and pharm. (much of it is redundant as I've had that in ADN school and have been doing it for 15 years), I'd like to think LPN to RN programs have some value and learning experiences for the open-minded.
    I totally agree, and every LPN will learn new stuff because no one has expertise in every area of nursing so I know it's not redundant. Glad to hear that your area steers them in those directions and less med/surg.

    And yes (sigh) I'm learning a lot in the BSN program as well. More than I want sometimes.
  7. by   cctparamedic
    I Think that paramedics with college back-ground and x-years of experience should be allowed to enter a LPN/LVN to RN class.
  8. by   mixyplixy
    Letting an LVN only test to be an RN is like learning to ride a bike reading a book...doesnt work
  9. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from RazorbackRN
    Really? I've never heard of a program not having ANY hospital clinicals. I'm an RN, but still I just can't believe that they wouldn't at least spend some time in the hospital arena.

    My LPN clinicals were all hospital except for the first semester.
  10. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from cctparamedic
    I Think that paramedics with college back-ground and x-years of experience should be allowed to enter a LPN/LVN to RN class.

    Your skills may be up to par, however, two different scopes of practice. I would be afraid to challenge the RN-NCLEX without nursing classes. As a RN you need to know your scope.
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    They just started one like this in my area...but it's for EMT's as well as LVN's and paramedics....

    Quote from cctparamedic
    I Think that paramedics with college back-ground and x-years of experience should be allowed to enter a LPN/LVN to RN class.
  12. by   puglie
    The nurses (RN) that come out of school and work at my facility ask a LOT of questions and they are asking the LPN's

    There is nothing like good old fashion experience ! No matter what you do for a living and that includes nursing.

    I went to LPN school way back in the 70's and I had A&P and it was a huge book and I had to learn a lot of stuff . I hear today that LPN school is about 12 months in NJ .

    The grads I talk to now did not learn a lot of the stuff I did when I went to school. I went for almost 2 years to be an LPN .

    Didn't go back for RN due to having children and raising a family all these years. I am back in school now. All the pre reqs UGH . IT's terrible. Where are all the diploma schools when ya need them? But you will have an associates degree the college counslor said .. HA I told her I'm 53 years old I don't want nor do I need and Associates degree LOL. I just want my RN.
    *SIGH*

    I helped a coworker study for her RN . We studied from the big huge RN book. I pretty much aced most of the questions . If it was the real test I would have passed with flying colors.

    As far as hiring forigners . Well we had a resident that had a hair line fracture and I was taking a report from said RN and I asked her where the hair line fracture was . She looked at me like I was an idiot and said

    You know the fracture thats at the base of her head , the hairline . I thought it was a joke until on of the other nurses told me that this person was 1 shy of a 6 pack and she was serious with what she has said !! I just shook my head.

    I guess the standard of education is not as high as it is here LOL . I do agree that they make it extremely difficult in the USA to get your RN. I am trying to go through Excelsor college , No math required ( thank heavens )
    It's a tough way to do it so we shall see. I dont know what the answer is but I am sure a lot of us could pass the RN test with no problem at all .

    The whole thing boils down to $$$$$$$$$ The colleges would NEVER let it happen . The problem with that is our residents are suffering and will continue to do so as long as money is more important to these big corps.

    Where I work we had 56 patients 2 nurses and 2 nurses aids last night . I am dog tired physically and mentally . And NO a lot of the people DID NOT get the care they needed. Treatments ?? LOL what are they ??

    And they wonder why there's a shortage !! They better do something and do it fast. There are 4 nurses where I work that are leaving nursing all together . Can't blame them .. So ya Give the LPN's their test If you have enough experience to pass it then more power to ya . As I said eariler . There's nothing like good old fashion EXP !!!!

    And if I had my RN,BSN,any kind of N I would welcome the new new RN's with open arms and thank heavens for the help.
  13. by   muffylpn
    Quote from Gods child
    I don't think there should be any shortcuts to becoming an RN. In the time it would take to get the five years experience as an LPN one could have already completed an LPN-RN program. However, I do think that employers paying for LPN-RN bridge programs are a great idea. And remember, there is no nursing shortage...

    This is like a Dental Assistant wishing to become a Dental Hygienist if she studies real hard and passes the test (because after all they do a lot of the same things). But in reality the formal education is what separates the two professions. I can see where you are coming from so I hope you don't take this the wrong way.
    No it is not like that-why can I say this-I was a dental asst for several
    years before I was an LPN- never ever was I allowed to clean someone
    teeth nor was any other dental asst I know. I do not agree that
    an LPN should just be able to study and take the test- first of
    all really a slap in the face to all RNs- but there really should be a
    bridge program of an additional year that would allow LPNs to sit
    for another 10 months- that would be fair- but to allow ? RN to
    come from other countries with a peice of paper stamped/ noterized
    by their school and allow them to sit without fully checking what
    classes they took and how well they read or understand English is
    not acceptable either

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