LPN to RN through testing? - page 2

I just feel that I'm going to get a lot of flak on this, but here goes...Since there's such a nursing shortage, why not let LPN's take the RN test with some parameters? I just thought of a few: 5... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    None of the programs in my area run longer than 12 months. But most attend classes about 2.5 days a week for the transitiion program . Even in my LVN to BSN program it was just 3 days. Make this stuff accelerated and go all week you could cut the time in nursing school in half, sure it would be harder but if the accelerated students some with limited medical back ground can do it why cant a licensed nurse do it. I may just be letting off steam here, but I have always felt that when people are speaking of getting more people in school so we can turn out RN's faster, the LVN's dont get much consideration. :spin:

    Quote from Gods child
    Accelerated programs aren't trying to bypass continuing education by "testing out of" anything. I know of several people who have completed an LPN-RN bridge program in about 15 months (or less).
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    Actually if you want to go to Tarleton it is 54 hours for entrance but 64 hour total. they will let you slack on some hours but they pick the hours in which you must complete after admission. I know stats is one and some of your histories and gov. I had all mine done but stats and algebra when I was admitted. But this is a BSN program understandable.... I dont know which one os 42 hrs but TCC is 34hr's or so and Hill is something in the mid 20's . I guess weatherford is the shortest something like 16-18hr's to get in but 21-22 hr of pre-classes in all. What ever it is just crazy...all that stress then you fight with every LVN in Tarrant county to get a spot.

    Quote from TheCommuter
    The local LPN-to-RN bridge programs in this area are typically 1 year in length, but the major catch is a whole slew of prerequisite classes before entry. One program requires 42 prerequisite credit hours before you can enter their program. A local LVN-to-BSN program requires 64 credit hours of prerequisites before you'll be considered for admission.
  3. by   Gods child
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The local LPN-to-RN bridge programs in this area are typically 1 year in length, but the major catch is a whole slew of prerequisite classes before entry. One program requires 42 prerequisite credit hours before you can enter their program. A local LVN-to-BSN program requires 64 credit hours of prerequisites before you'll be considered for admission.

    I see. I don't think it is too much to ask to take pre-requisites. The accelerated programs have pre-requisites as well. The 64 credit hours for the LPN-BSN program sounds extreme at first, but is sounds as if it is similar to my traditional BSN program. My BSN program was set up where you completed about two years of pre-requisites and general education requirements (about 60 c/hr), and then you were only eligible to be admitted to the program when you had a maximum of six general education requirements left to complete (most people admitted were finished with their general education requirements). The actual "nursing program" was 5 semesters. I only know of one LPN-BSN program in my area and there are only 2 nursing classes they do not have to take when compared to a traditional BSN program, it seems like more credits would transfer over, but I guess the school want their money.


    When I read that back to myself it sounded really mean, but I didn't mean it that way
    Last edit by Gods child on Oct 26, '06
  4. by   Gods child
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    None of the programs in my area run longer than 12 months. But most attend classes about 2.5 days a week for the transitiion program . Even in my LVN to BSN program it was just 3 days. Make this stuff accelerated and go all week you could cut the time in nursing school in half, sure it would be harder but if the accelerated students some with limited medical back ground can do it why cant a licensed nurse do it. I may just be letting off steam here, but I have always felt that when people are speaking of getting more people in school so we can turn out RN's faster, the LVN's dont get much consideration. :spin:

    There is a weekend LPN-RN program at a Community College a few hours from me (they are in class all day, I think its from 8-5 or 9-4). I think more programs like that would benefit some LPN's wishing to become RN's.
  5. by   Sandi0302
    Thats exactly what I am looking for...something to make it a little easier. I already have some credits from a four year university...Bio, Chem, Microbiology, Algebra, English. Things are different these days. A lot of people (like me) have a child(or children) and have to work full time. Having a program where you learn at work doing hands on and getting credits at the same time would be fabulous.
    Not for nothing, but I have the NCLEX RN study guide, and I breeze through all the questions. I am not saying I should "just be able" to take the NCLEX RN NOW, but there are a lot of similarities in the LPN / RN curriculum. I think the misunderstanding is about what the LPN course actually entails. We learn A LOT more than we are actually allowed to do or end up doing in the career field, which I really don't think is fair.
  6. by   OC_An Khe
    No, I don't think this is a good idea. In addition to many good points mentioned above, in some states LPN training has zero clinical time in a hospital setting. Albeit not all RN jobs are in the hospital and at the bedside but it still needs to be part of your basic education in the profession.
  7. by   EmerNurse
    I've had several LPN friends in the RN bridge program who are struggling their way through the pre-req's and nursing courses. I've heard more than once "I didn't know I had to know all this!". So no, I don't think LPNs should challenge the RN boards... as one poster stated already.. you don't know what you don't know!

    That said, I know some excellent LPNs who can run rings around some RNs I know. But for the license, I think the formal education is necessary.

    Incidently, when I finally start my BSN, I can't wait to find out what I don't know LOL. Just wish, at my age, they didn't require more history, english, etc. Life experience should count toward the "well-rounded" student IMHO. hehe.
  8. by   mc3
    I don't know about other states, but in my program we started our clinicals on Day 2, and they ran right thru the day before I graduated....Many times were were told in the hospital than we could run rings around the RN's that were also doing clinicals - no joke!
    Just wondering, why would English Composition help or benefit an LPN who has been working aside an RN for 10+ years? For care plans? LPN write them anyway and I'm not aware of any problems..
    Come on....I guess most folks really don't know what an LPN program is comprised of.
    Also, the LPN program guidelines are federal, aren't they? Then how can there be a program with no clinicals?
    I repeat, if "you don't what what you don't know", then you wouldn't pass the test, would you? Therefore, you have to understand the theory, or be a really good guesser!
    And if you think there's a hard time recruiting RN instructors, try recruiting LPN instructors.
    Still don't see a reason why it couldn't be done

  9. by   Jules A
    Quote from mc3
    Come on....I guess most folks really don't know what an LPN program is comprised of.
    I can't imagine a LPN program not offering clinicals. We had great clinical experiences also. The only pre-reqs that I didn't need for LPN but now need for RN are statistics, speech, a humanities and English 102. Nothing nursing oriented and I can join the RNs in the first semester of their second year.

    I'd love the option to take the RN NCLEX because I'm confident I would pass it but thats only because I'm a good test taker. Unfortunately I don't feel comfortable that I have the knowledge to be a RN just yet.
  10. by   JohnBearPA
    Quote from ocankhe
    No, I don't think this is a good idea. In addition to many good points mentioned above, in some states LPN training has zero clinical time in a hospital setting. Albeit not all RN jobs are in the hospital and at the bedside but it still needs to be part of your basic education in the profession.
    Zero clinical time in a hospital setting? Are you kidding me? Look into this, and I'm sure you'll see that ANY LPN program has to meet standards as set by the State BON. Also, from my own personal experience, both as a student and as an LPN on several floors that had RN students from several local colleges, LPN programs generally (at least in my home state) have MORE clinical hours than the RN programs.
    I've also found that the PN students I've had on my floors not only knew much more at clinicals than their RN counterparts, but were more apt to ask to help with or witness procedures. That may be because the PN students seemed a bit older and may have had families to support, and took school very seriously. I'm not knocking the RN students, but as a whole, to my experience, they seemed younger and talked about "going out partying" and "what mom made for dinner last night", while the PN students didn't chit chat, they seemed very intent on learning.
    Again, this may be why they chose the PN program, as many in my class worked full time while attending school from 8-3 everyday and also had families at home to cook, clean, and spend time with. I myself chose the PN program as a jumping off spot, planning on going for my RN in the future when I have more time, more money, and the ability to put much more time into the studying I'll need to do. The PN program gave me marketable skills, for the shortest, tho most intense, period of time.
    As for my PN program, we had clinicals from week 2, to the week of graduation a year and 3 months later. We attended clinical 3 days a week, from 6am to 3pm, and had classroom from 8am to 3pm on the other two days a week. It's true we had off for the summer, but additional classes in Pharm were offerred, and most of us took them. Our clinicals ranged from med-surg, OB/GYN, NICU, Ped's, Ortho, MH/MR, Tele, OR, and had several observations in drug/alcohol dependency, emotionally and learning challenged children, School for the Deaf, etc.
    From my understanding, and from what my RN friends have told me, they never had an 8 hour day, either in the classroom or on the floor. That may vary by geographic area, and I'm only speaking for the area I went to school in.
    Not knocking anyone, but PN programs offer as many clinical hours "on the hospital floor" as the State BON says they have to, and I've NEVER heard of a program that offerred few or none!
    The original poster probably didn't mean it, but this reeks of bringing up the RN vs LPN thread, which has already been beat to death. We all need to work together, accept our provisions of licensure, and get the education we can or need to make ourselves happy in our working positions. Go back to school for a bridge program, as I planm to soon, or stay as a PN, but just be happy at your work, and do the best job you know how to do, and be the best NURSE you can be, whether it's PN or RN.
  11. by   Little Panda RN
    I am a LPN and have a Associates degree. I would only have 3 semesters to take to become a RN, that is of course after being accepted into the program. I have all the pre-regs done for the RN program accept for chemistry. All the pre-regs of the LPN program is what is required in the RN program. I did learn how to do care plans and assessments. All my clinicals were done in the hospital. I guess it just goes to show, it all depends on what state you live in. I personally would not feel ready to fill a pair of RN shoes without further education.
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from JohnBearPA
    We all need to work together, accept our provisions of licensure, and get the education we can or need to make ourselves happy in our working positions. Go back to school for a bridge program, as I planm to soon, or stay as a PN, but just be happy at your work, and do the best job you know how to do, and be the best NURSE you can be, whether it's PN or RN.
    Good advice JohnBearPA!
  13. by   mc3
    no, you are correct johnbearpa. i absolutely do not want to make this an rn-vs-lpn post! just thinking of ways to help fill a need...i will admit, as i originally said, i do not like the idea of overseas nurses coming here to take jobs that could be filled by u.s. citizens - qualified, competent ones, that is...

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