LPN REGRETS? - page 2

I RECENTLY PASSED MY STATE BOARDS FOR MY LPN LICENSE.THE MAJORITY OF THE CLASS I GRADUATED WITH ARE GOING ON TO AN RN PROGRAM.I DECIDED NOT TO CONTINUE AT THIS TIME BECAUSE I FEEL SO BURNED OUT... Read More

  1. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by julie:
    to pietem:

    I live in the west and the area where I live has a glut of nurses right now - therefore, the job market is terrible for LPN's. But, thanks for the vote of confidence - I graduated with honors, but as an LPN I guess it doesn't make a difference? I would love to hear from you or anyone else!!!

    It is hard to believe that there is a tight job market for nurses anywhere since all I am seeing is a shortage of nurses where I live. I have worked in long term care and in hospitals. I feel that in a hospital I am more accountable or on a lower level then a staff RN, whereas, in long term care I was more on the same level as a staff RN since we performed the same duties with a few exceptions. I am back in school for my RN for several reasons. I have been a LPN for twenty years now.
  2. by   terilu2
    I hear and understand. I'm an LPN working in a long term care facility. I'm on my way back to school this fall for my RN. I too have been belittled as an LPN, however I'm the one that has to do blood draws, IV's, etc. because the RN's at my facility aren't sure about their capabilities! I love my job, but make a lot less money than the RN's, while doing the same job. Many times family members will ask for the RN. It's awkward since usually they get referred back to me. I've also worked with many a wonderful and energetic RN. The CNA's have rec'd 2 raises, the nurses, none! There is such a nursing shortage here. Soon the CNA's in this area will be making the same as the nurses! Go back to school ASAP!
    Originally posted by julie:
    I RECENTLY PASSED MY STATE BOARDS FOR MY LPN LICENSE.THE MAJORITY OF THE CLASS I GRADUATED
    WITH ARE GOING ON TO AN RN PROGRAM.I DECIDED NOT TO CONTINUE AT THIS TIME BECAUSE I FEEL SO BURNED OUT WITH SCHOOL - I ALSO HAVE A FAMILY TO TAKE CARE OF. NOW I HAVE SOME REGRET AS TO TAKING TIME OFF AND NOT PURSUING MY RN. PEOPLE TREAT ME AS IF AN LPN ISN'T A "REAL" NURSE LIKE AN RN. ARE THERE LPN'S OUT THERE THAT ARE HAPPY BEING LPN'S? SO FAR, I HAVE FOUND THE JOB MARKET VERY DEPRESSING.IS THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO TOOK TIME OFF BETWEEN LPN AND RN SCHOOL? I WOULD LIKE ANY FEEDBACK!! THANKS!!
  3. by   JJWatsLVN
    Julie, I realize that it has been sometime since your post, but I felt I needed to respond. I am currently an LVN moving toward an RN-ADN transitional program this fall. I have been a nurse for 14 years. I have been belittled as an LVN, but it has always been by RNs who have less experience than I do. Don't let what others think take away your knowledge and expertise. They are only words and actions. I think new nurses are sometimes intimidated by experienced nurses no matter how many initials come after the name. I am well respected and am approached by many nurses (RNs and LVNs) for my opinion. I say that not to brag. I say that because I took the time to learn and "know my stuff." RESPECT YOURSELF and others will soon follow. Good luck to you and don't let what others say bother you. You know you are a good nurse. What matters is the smile on your patients face or the thank you at the end of a grueling 12 hour shift.

  4. by   ozbunji
    Im what is called an Enrolled Nurse in Australia. I wonder if it is similar to what an LPN is.

    The staff I work with are great. They know my capabilities and leave me to care for my patients, stepping in only if I request it.

    It is a shame that so many ENs/LPNs have had a different experience however. The point is we are all supposed to be working together as a team for the benefit of our patients, not belittling each other.

    I have gone back to studying to complete my RN after 11 years in my current role. This was mainly a financial decision. I find that the background knowledge I have picked up as an EN is invaluable to my studies and really consider myself lucky to be able to study and work at the same time in the same field.

    So to any ENs/LPNs who "have regrets" - DONT. Often you are the backbone of a ward. Take your time post your training. Theres a lot to learn that the books couldnt possibly hope to teach. But what am I telling you that you didnt already know
  5. by   KGuy
    I am sooooo happy to hear the encouragement LPN's are getting
    I will be starting school on August 21, 2000 (LPN) I have already heard remarks about LPN verus RN
    thank ya'll the positive talk
  6. by   Jo_deye_yuh
    I have been an LPN for 2 years. I worked concurrently in a LTC, Medical Clinic, and hospital. I am now only working in the clinic and assist in surgeries in the hospital and surgery center. What I have found regarding ~RN-itis, is in the LTC I was an equal and valued professional. In the clinic setting I am an equal and valued professional, where my knowledge and skills have been greatly proliferated and have been called upon in many specialties. I am an Orthopedic nurse, Urology nurse and Triage nurse. I have worked in Internal Med, OB/GYN, and Family Practice. I just recently recieved a call from a VA asking to come work on the Med/Surg floor.

    I have had the intention of going back for my RN for reasons ranging from: my own personal career goal, disrespect of LPN's, pay, and job opprotunities, etc. But due to financial constraints, family and work, I have not thus far. The experience I have gained working in the clinic and in surgery has given me much confidence and others call upon my skills, (including RN's and DON's). My experience in the hospitals have been less favorable...RN-itis is felt as I scrub in, and even into the OR. I do my job and do it well, soon I gain the respect of my colleagues regardless of the initals that follow their birth given name.

    I work with some top notch LPN's and RN's, and those that take the time to teach and share their talents, gain my high esteem and respect. Those that snub and belittle, I pity. The opprotunity to teach is such a gift! Now I am teaching skills to some RN's that once taught me skills. We are a team and pitch in where the need calls. When a "nurse" is needed, LPN/RN is not a pre-requisite. Each nurse is valued for her skills and knowledge. Now our LPN program is instituting IV training into their curriculum. Now employers are giving their current LPN's the option for IV certificaton. This is the only legal difference between the two branches of nursing in my state. However, I respect and need the position of RN supervisors, as they do hold a more technical role, and ulitmately are responsible for delegated duties and actions. However, they have made assurance that the LPN's working with them are trained and educated within their capabilities to perform adequatley. I do plan to accomplish furthering my education, but do not regret my time spent being an LPN. The skills, knowledge and experience I have been afforded is priceless. I will carry it all as I take my RN state boards AND as I care for my patients and work side by side with co-workers. Just because the initials say 'Licenced Practical Nurse' does not change the fact that my patients respect my title of 'NURSE', and the knowledgable, skilled care I give them. I respect the nurse (RN/LPN) for his/her talents not his/her initials.

    There are already so many things against us in our profession, it is sad that we get degraded from within our 'own' profession.

    Best of luck and HAPPY NURSING LPN's & RN's!
  7. by   Rie
    I was an E/N for 22 years, then went on to do my RN. They phased out E/N training in Britain about 10 years ago which is a shame. As the numbers of E/N decreases, the health service is losing a valuable link in the skill chain which will not be replaced. I think you should think positively, there are opportunities for you to continue your education and complete your RN. And your experience as an LPN will make you a better nurse.
  8. by   lorrie
    never ever feel like getting your license to practice as a practical nurse is not a huge accomplishment. a LPN license is a valuable building block, invaluable experince, and the key to being a great RN if you wish to pursue your education. if not a LPN is a very important part of the healthcare profession. you will always have insecure,intimidated people make comments about the LPN's, but on the same token some BSN's feel the same about ADN's, and the MSN's may have similiar feelings regarding the BSN's. it is a vicious cycle one should not get caught up in. just do a great job and provide excellant patient care and disregard the negative.
    --have you ever noticed if someone says they work at burger king(just for the sake of argument) no one asks.."so you're the owner" or "oh your the area manager?" if you flip the burgers people are satisfied with that.
    i have no idea why nursing is so different, you feel harrassed if you do not have your masters of science degree.
    anyways congradulations! be proud!
    keep up the good work all nurses!!
  9. by   blindog45
    Originally posted by NC nurse:
    Wow, did Sandra E. say it all!! I too opted not to go for my RN and heard all the threats of the "phase out". Now LPN's are greatly needed here in NC. There are sign-on bonuses everywhere. I chose to take a 2 yr hiatus and upon reentry saw the respect that I had missed doing odd jobs. I did however stay out of hospitals, it can be too back-biting if there lacks control. I saw home health care pays much better and training wonderful and a great supportive team-RN"s and LPN's, so, if you're feeling lack of value, perhaps a change of environment/people is what is the needed remedy. Doctor's offices also have a resurgence of LPN's, after having hired CMA's. I guess we are here to stay!! Give it time, and don't be hard on yourself.
    Hi, this is off the subject, but I noticed you commented on LPN's being needed in NC. I was thinking of relocating to Hickory NC. Do you have any knowledge of jobs there or in Lenoire?? Thanx..
  10. by   puzzler
    Hi Julie

    I was an LPN for 10 years also. I did take a little time off from school before going on to RN school.

    I enjoed my work as an LPN but I am sure you will find the same things that irritated me are still there today. Ex: Short on RN's today and the LPN is qualified to start IV's-- enough nurses today and we are all of a sudden not qualified. There are very few things that I do as an RN today that I did not do as an LPN at some time or another. The difference is now I get to do it all the time and also get the higher pay rate.

    As to rather LPN or RN's are the better nurse-- I have worked with good and bad from both classes.

    Do what makes you happy in your work. It is very important to be happy and confident in what you are doing.

    Good luck

    ------------------
    Sheryl
    If you enjoy word puzzles come visit me at www.CrosswordsForNurses.com
  11. by   lisagh
    I personally judge nurses (and all staff) by their contributions to patient care. Having RNs and LPNs makes a great team. I have been in many institutions where it seems LPNs are more loyal to the organization while RNs come and go. Just my opinion..
    (I am RN and have never been an LPN, but that is what I have seen speaking of a hospital setting.)
    Thanks for everyone RN or LPN for what we all do each day- a difficult challenging job.
    Lisa www.georgianurse.com
  12. by   momangel29
    I have been an LPN for almost three years and I am not sorry that I did this first. I am now just starting an RN program but not because I am ashamed of being an LPN but because I want to do more and have the education. It isn't about money for me even though I need money to survive. I am proud to be a practical nurse and I will also be proud to be a registered nurse. You have to do what is comfortable for you. momangel29
  13. by   maikranz
    Originally posted by blindog45:
    Hi, this is off the subject, but I noticed you commented on LPN's being needed in NC. I was thinking of relocating to Hickory NC. Do you have any knowledge of jobs there or in Lenoire?? Thanx..
    Greetings! and welcome to the Piedmont/Foothills of the great North State!
    After the snow y'all have endured, NC probably does look warm.
    The Sunday issue of The Charlotte Observer (www.charlotte.com/observer/ I think) has pages of openings under "healthcare"--Catawba Memorial Hospital and Glenn R. Frye are two hospitals in Hickory; I'm not sure about Lenoir. The two cities are only ~20 miles apart. Good luck

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