Looking for support and respect with little to no results - page 3

Hello. I am a RVT in GA. For those of you who do not know what this means ... I am a registered veterinary technician. I graduated from a 2 year degree program that covered the many different... Read More

  1. by   charebec65
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    ...The nurse administers care to a human which involves emotional, mental, psychological, and spiritual elements which are not found in veterinary medicine..
    I don't know that I would agree with this statement as a whole. While I don't feel my Golden believes in God or anything spiritual, I do know that he has a whole range of emotions. In his 11 years I've seen him display happiness, sadness, depression, fear and pain. You can see it in his demeanor. He is also very perceptive of human emotions. He would make a great therapy dog.

    To the OP, I totally respect what you do. Rusty was hit by a car several years ago. His pelvis was fractured (broken in half) and our vet quit counting smaller fractures at 15. We had to take him to Cincinnati for surgery and he got wonderful care....
  2. by   slinkeecat
    < POOF> Whacking you w/ my trusty magical wand....
    VET NURSE!!!
    I totally support you and recognize you as a nurse.... I have 3 dogs and 2 cats... My pets have better health care than my children LOL I have always been grateful to our vet and his nurses, techs, receptionist... They are the most dedicated people I know....

    Our beloved beagle Queen developed bone cancer and we did everything to keep her comfy and finally one night I couldn't help her the medicine stopped working and she collapsed in the snow... called the vet. He sent his nurse/tech w/ the stuff to put her to sleep... they drove in the snow storm to our farmhouse high in the mts of WV on bad roads.... held me and my husband as we held our dog and cried, gently, respectfully let us talk to her and say all the stories about her life and they injected her and my husband cried, stroking her, and telling her to get the rabbit... .Broke my heart...Then 3 days later they sent us a sympathy card.... so totally unexpected.... 3 weeks later... Christy... The VET NURSE.... called and begged us to come to the vet's office... we did... and they gave use a really ugly, flea bitten, 6 week old beagle who needed round the clock care.... healed my husband's and children's hearts.... PRINCESS is a year and a half .... and boy is she a keeper,
    I can deal w/ human suffering.... animals.... nope!
    Bless you. I have total respect for your profession and just wanted you to know it!!!
    You are the VET NURSE!!!!
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Fuzzy
    Actually I do administer emotional, mental, psychological, and spiritual care to to humans as part of my profession. I'm a CVT (Certified Veterinary Technician) which is essentially the same as an RVT as far as training goes. See not only do I treat animals, I also treat and educate people. In fact the human componenet is a very large part of my job. The nurses who work with infants and small childern understand that the child is only one-half of the equation. The parents are the other half.
    Likewise it is the same in my job. The animal or patient is the easier part of the equation. The client or the human part can be a little more difficult depending on the situation. I have comforted small childern when they have had a treasured pet die (usually the death of a pet is a child's first experience with death). I have held the hands of the eldery woman while her 17 year old dog is euthanized. This dog was her last tie to her deceased husband. She is now alone. I have consoled clients while their animal is in surgery. I have taught clients how to give their diabetic pet insulin and educated them in diabetes management. I have counselled clients on the importance of keeping their pet slim (obesity is a big problem in companion animals just as it is in people). Heck some of our clients have even given up smoking when they found out that second hand smoke is dangerous to their pets. I have prayed with owners that their pet will live and I have helped them decide when they will have to make the euthanasia decision. Like nurses, I have dealt with angry, depressed, drug crazed, dangerous, happy, crazy, frightened, guilt ridden, sad, and difficult people. In fact, I have found the people more unpredictable at times than the animals.

    Tonight was especially hard. A six month old kitten was brought in by a local RN and her two childern. The kitten had been given three doses of childern's tylenol over a 48 hour period because she had been caught in a recliner and was in pain. The kitten was comatose. While the other CVT and doctor worked on the kitten, I consoled the clients. The mother had so much guilt because she didn't realize that tylenol was toxic to pets. She had figured the correct dose as if it had been for an infant and everything. She thought that she was doing right by the animal. All three were in tears and so was I. The kitten couldn't be saved. I was not judgemental because this person was an RN. Just because she's an RN doesn't mean that she knew that tylenol was very toxic to cats. ( There was an MD who had the same result when he gave his young hyper dog ritalan several years ago). There are people of many professions that don't know this fact. She was just another human who was concerned about her pet. She had so much guilt and sadness that I worried about her and her childern. I called her friend so that she would have some help.

    I saw another discussion on this board concerning, "What would you be if you weren't a nurse". Many nurses mentioned that they were interested in veterinary medicine and in other animal professions. So see we have alot in common.

    Fuzzy
    Very similar but very different at the same time. It would be difficult for you to cross over into human nursing without going to nursing school, as it would be impossible for me to cross over into veterinary medicine without going to school as well. The legalities involved are very different: euthanasia for suffering animals=acceptable however euthanasia for suffering humans=unethical and illegal, how child abuse is handled vs. how animal abuse is handled, use of various community resources and follow up care within the community for chronic management of healthcare problems, meeting the psychosocial needs of your client as well as dealing with the same issues with various family members, dealing with addiction, restraints, etc....there is more to being a nurse than just being compassionate and clinical skills. While I don't dispute that they are similar, the complexity of the human spirit and one's psychosocial needs that change within the aspects of cultural diversity and throughout the lifespan can not be compared with holistic care of an ill pet and their family. This is not meant to be demeaning so please do not take it that way. You and the members of your profession should be empowered to make your skills and profession distinct from any other profession, including nursing.
  4. by   Jules A
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Very similar but very different at the same time. It would be difficult for you to cross over into human nursing without going to nursing school, as it would be impossible for me to cross over into veterinary medicine without going to school as well. The legalities involved are very different: euthanasia for suffering animals=acceptable however euthanasia for suffering humans=unethical and illegal, how child abuse is handled vs. how animal abuse is handled, use of various community resources and follow up care within the community for chronic management of healthcare problems, meeting the psychosocial needs of your client as well as dealing with the same issues with various family members, dealing with addiction, restraints, etc....there is more to being a nurse than just being compassionate and clinical skills. While I don't dispute that they are similar, the complexity of the human spirit and one's psychosocial needs that change within the aspects of cultural diversity and throughout the lifespan can not be compared with holistic care of an ill pet and their family. This is not meant to be demeaning so please do not take it that way. You and the members of your profession should be empowered to make your skills and profession distinct from any other profession, including nursing.
    Well I'll respectfully disagree because RVTs deal with every one of the things you have written about except the restraints since animals don't have many "rights" it is perfectly legal to restrain them and force treatment. We are only dealing with one species, RVTs are dealing with many more. For those who don't know,cats are not just small dogs. :wink2: They all have different diseases, med reactions etc. Thats not even getting into large animal like horses, cows, pigs, sheep they are all different too and then there is birds and exotics. Huge amount of knowledge imo and again the courses are the same as ADN, although we know there is friction as to whether or not they are as good as BSNs, lol.

    What if nearly every day we had to deal with the pts family deciding whether or not "little Susy" was worth a thousand dollars to repair a fracture? I'm also not saying one professoin is harder or more valuable than the other because why can't they both be equal?
  5. by   augigi
    In Australia, you guys ARE called vet nurses. My sister is a vet tech in the US and she is awesome, I think you guys are grossly underpaid for what you do!

    I must say that I think what you do is closer to "nurse" than "technician" - but "vet nurse" makes me think you nurse the vet!!
  6. by   Fiona59
    What I'm finding interesting in this whole thread is: working nurses are supportive of the OP and students not so. Could this be because they are still caught in in the indoctrination of nursing school???
  7. by   charebec65
    Quote from Jules A
    ...What if nearly every day we had to deal with the pts family deciding whether or not "little Susy" was worth a thousand dollars to repair a fracture?...

    I mentioned in an earlier post about my golden having been hit by a truck. There was never any question in our minds as to whether or not he was worth the $1,800 it was going to cost to fix him (we had some of it but not all with 5 kids). The problem was where the money was going to come from. In the end, we called our mortgage company and arranged to pay our mortgage a week late, telling them there was a medical emergency. My husband put in a lot of extra hours at work (I had just gotten out of the hospital and wasn't released to go back to work yet).

    Maybe many would think we are nuts but our dog is treated like one of our kids. He gets an annual checkup, if he gets sick he goes to the vet, his food high quality all natural food added to fresh veggies, oatmeal and vitamins/mineral supplements (my goal is a cancer and heart disease deterrant diet), we have birthday parties for him (non-dairy dog ice cream of course) complete with presents and singing and presents under the tree for Christmas. When we go on a vacation where we can't take him there are only 2 places I'll leave him......with my brother or with one of my friends.....I know he'll get the same care with them as he does at home. Since it was obvious the underground fence wasn't working for him (the accident) we built a regular fence out back. In doing so he lost the ability to go out his doggie door through the garage. Now he has a door in the back so he can come and go as he pleases or needs.

    It will break our hearts when he dies and to think about it even now is difficult. I feel for those people who just can't find the funds to try to fix their pets. Since Rusty's accident I've been getting health insurance on him. So far we've only had to use it for what thankfully turned out to be a lipoma but could have been worse.
  8. by   mrparhamrvt
    Thanks everyone for the positive responses. It is nice for once to see so many of them. I just want to reiterate that I have NO interest in using the title nurse in any way, shape, or form. I am a veterinary technician, that is what I went to school for and as one poster said, my job is so completely totally different than nursing.

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