looking back, are there courses that you thought were not necessary? - page 5

by nowIamRN

At my nursing program, we have to take two semesters of Fundamental of Nursing. Now, i'm not saying this course is unnecessary, but two whole semesters of learning what "therapeutic communication" is , just sames like waste of... Read More


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    I agree with some of the previous posters that some gen ed classes are good to have regardless. Like me myslef. I am a pre-nursing student, while I feel that classessuch as sociology are repettive and unecessary, I do feel others are useful. I for, for example, will complete my minimal req prereqs this spring where I will only have to take 1 class, but I am taking extra course like the Business Course on mamnagement, the Humanities class on Critical thinking and an extra psychology on those with mental illnesses.
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    I'm also taking extra second language courses since I'm already an intermediate spanish student.
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    ENGLISH II - LITERATURE AND POETRY

    <insert headdesk here>

    Perhaps - perhaps - for a BSN I could understand it, but this is my ADN! And yet, I just turned in a paper discussing symbolism in Frost's "Dust of Snow" poem.
    PatMac10,RN and pagandeva2000 like this.
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    After being a Diploma nurse for more that 20 years I went back to school through an RN to BSN program. I had to take Intro to Computers (one of my graded assignments was to set up an e-mail account.....mind you this was an ONLINE PROGRAM to begin with) another mandatory class was Medical Terminology. Really, I had no idea what all those big medical sounding words meant....I've only been charting them for 20 years now.
    All in all - I can now say I am a Diploma nurse with a BSN. I spent a ton of money and still didn't learn anything that I did not learn from my diploma program and bedside experience.
    At least now I am officially qualified to keep the job I have held for years. Pfffttt.
    awsmfun, DogWmn, and pagandeva2000 like this.
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    Quote from KeyMaster
    After being a Diploma nurse for more that 20 years I went back to school through an RN to BSN program. I had to take Intro to Computers (one of my graded assignments was to set up an e-mail account.....mind you this was an ONLINE PROGRAM to begin with) another mandatory class was Medical Terminology. Really, I had no idea what all those big medical sounding words meant....I've only been charting them for 20 years now.
    All in all - I can now say I am a Diploma nurse with a BSN. I spent a ton of money and still didn't learn anything that I did not learn from my diploma program and bedside experience.
    At least now I am officially qualified to keep the job I have held for years. Pfffttt.
    It sounds as if you chose a program that did not meet your educational needs -- and/or a program that may have been of poor quality. I assume that these courses were listed as part of their curriculum when you enrolled in the program. You knew they were part of the requirements when you signed up. If you felt strongly that they were not the type of course you wanted to take, why did you enroll in that particular program? It's not as if there aren't multiple RN-BSN programs. There are plenty to choose from.

    I'm sorry that sounds harsh. But I see a lot of people here at allnurses complaining about their schools, their curriculum, etc. But no one is holding a gun to their heads and forcing them to go to those particular programs. People should shop around: be a consumer. Choose programs that best meet their needs and then take responsibilty for the choices they make.
    pers and morte like this.
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    It gives me a little tear to hear that you think a couple of English classes are unimportant. It's a post-high school education. Higher Education. It should have the well-rounded basics as well as your primary professional classes.

    However, the 20 hours of nursing fundamentals, nursing theory, nursing concepts, nursing history, nursing leadership and nursing perspectives that I have taken could have EASILY been condensed into a 2 hour course. For God's sake, give us more hard core sciences and less absolute fluff. Instead of 4 hours of patho, give me 8! I want a separate, 4-6 hour pharmacology course! I want a serious course in self defense, how to de-escalate a volatile situation, and how to safely and effectively take someone down and put them in restraints. No more endless lectures by out of touch professors, waxing on about Florence and Jean Watson, with butterflies and unicorns dancing in the background. I want more upper level science classes, more about personal safety, and LESS FLUFF!
    MInurse.st, DogWmn, Faeriewand, and 1 other like this.
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    Literature by Women.......
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    Quote from Tanzanite
    Literature by Women.......
    Who's interested in that?
    S.N. Visit likes this.
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    My psychology and sociology courses were very different.

    In my LVN program we had a one day class we could have done without. It was basically a high school course on how to get and keep a job. They lectured a little bit and showed a movie of high school kids coming in to work at Ding Dongs late and then getting fired. LOL

    We had an instructor who used to take us into the lab and we missed our first clinical day so she could go over everything we learned. At the time we thought it was totally cool. Then next semester my clinical instructor (different one) pointed out that you learn better by actually working with patients. I found out she was right and the first one was goofy. Going into lab when everyone else was gone was just a play day for us.

    For RN I couldn't believe we had a geri class during our second year. Isn't that first year stuff? It was too easy. Everything lower and slower, right?

    For LVN I couldn't believe they waited to introduce Respiratory/resp complications until our THIRD and final semester! We needed that first semester or at least the beginning of second semester.
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    For a bachelor's or associate's degree of any sort, you're stuck having to put up with a variety of non-related coursework. Even Engineering students have to take some of those!

    At my program, though, even the relevant, nursing core coursework didn't seem to be covered very effectively. We rushed through 1,000-page med-surg/pathophys/specialty textbooks - 300 pages of assigned reading covering 100 different conditions supposedly covered in two 3-hour lectures each week?! Get serious! Pharmacology was a 10-week class to cover all classes of drugs, mechanisms of actions, side effects etc. Talk about barely scratching the surface!! Comprehension and retention didn't seem to be the objective, heck questions were usually brushed aside because there was no time for that in the rushed, cursory lectures; instead the objective seemed to be for the school to be able to say "see, we taught (insert known medical fact)... it was right there in section 3.5 of chapter 48!" The short, multiple choice NCLEX-style tests didn't even really test for content.

    As for being a wary consumer in regard to schooling choices, there's only so much one can know to look for prior to having more experience and exposure. If someone chooses an expensive unheard of private program in the strip mall next to 7-11, I would wonder why they didn't research it better before investing. But if one is choosing between well-established nursing programs, I don't think it's unreasonable for a prospective student to assume that either program would provide a strong professional foundation. There might be important differences between programs, but what is the minimum expectations of any solid, accredited program?

    Despite regulated nursing school requirements, there does appear to be *vast* differences in the depth of concrete/scientific content (chemistry, anatomy, physiology, pathophys, pharmacology) required in the various RN programs out there. We can't argue that this or that level of knowledge is *necessary* to be a nurse if many well-established nursing programs do NOT require that level of knowledge.


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