looking back, are there courses that you thought were not necessary? - page 4

by nowIamRN 4,253 Views | 52 Comments

At my nursing program, we have to take two semesters of Fundamental of Nursing. Now, i'm not saying this course is unnecessary, but two whole semesters of learning what "therapeutic communication" is , just sames like waste of... Read More


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    Most of them...just kidding...

    Sociology made no sense, neither did English Literature. The patient doesn't care about my opinion about poetry. I felt it was wasted energy.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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    I have to go against the trend. I am a new grad and I am either learning new skills for the first time or using skills often that I rarely used or had the chance to use in nursing school. Quite frankly, skills are easy enough to pick up.

    Like most new grads, my unit is mostly staffed with nurses with a great deal more experience than me. Their skills are far superior and their assessments are quicker. They can also more readily identify what sort of disposition the patient is likely to have. (I work in an ER)

    HOWEVER, the purpose of all of the book learning is to gain compliance among nurses regarding certain procedures and activities and to increase the nurse's ability to safely care for his or her patient and reduce potential nursing and medical errors. A LOT of the nurses have no idea why they do certain things or why its important that such and such is done. Naturally, their compliance goes down and in turn, the nursing staff loses its credibility.

    Also, I note that sociology and developmental psych are important depending on where you work. Developmental psych very important in peds. Sociology very important when addressing concerns that are community specific.
    Faeriewand likes this.
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    Quote from morte
    if you want to go to nursing SCHOOL, then find a diploma institution....otherwise you need to understand that there are criteria that need to be met to get that ADN or BSN.
    I personally am not saying that we should go back to skills only in "school",( I think there may be a cultural divide on the way that that word is used).......but like some one posted about English lit what in the world is that going to do for your pt?? A class on how to write for academic essays is essential including referencing systems that your uni uses.

    Statistics in itself does not seem useful to me as a purely mathematical subject................how many of your class are nurse researchers without further education? Health statistics are important however to see how we should be educating our patients and where the nurses of tomorrow should be focusing.

    However dealing with conflict is an everyday occurrence and yet most of my conflict resolution comes from the job I had as a student as a supervisor in a bar.

    I have done my share of research proposals and thesis and recognise the need for a well rounded education - lets not cut personal & professional development (e.g communication and diversity) Psych (eg Maslows' hierarchy of needs).

    Maybe I am seeing this in a different light than a lot of AN, being educated in Ireland where our education is more specialist rather than the broad education of US nurses (maybe trying to squeeze too many topics into one course?? Adult, psych, intellectual disability, midwifery, child) The first 3 are 3 DIFFERENT undergrad degrees and the last 2 require a degree in one of the 3 before you can enrol in the course. In my adult (also called general because you work in a GENERAL hospital rather than a psych hospital or maternity hospital) we touched on the other subjects and done short 4 week placements in each of the areas other than what the title of our degree was.
    Fiona59, pagandeva2000, and PatMac10,RN like this.
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    Quote from Karenmaire
    I personally am not saying that we should go back to skills only in "school",( I think there may be a cultural divide on the way that that word is used).......but like some one posted about English lit what in the world is that going to do for your pt?? A class on how to write for academic essays is essential including referencing systems that your uni uses.

    Statistics in itself does not seem useful to me as a purely mathematical subject................how many of your class are nurse researchers without further education? Health statistics are important however to see how we should be educating our patients and where the nurses of tomorrow should be focusing.

    However dealing with conflict is an everyday occurrence and yet most of my conflict resolution comes from the job I had as a student as a supervisor in a bar.

    I have done my share of research proposals and thesis and recognise the need for a well rounded education - lets not cut personal & professional development (e.g communication and diversity) Psych (eg Maslows' hierarchy of needs).
    Maybe I am seeing this in a different light than a lot of AN, being educated in Ireland where our education is more specialist rather than the broad education of US nurses (maybe trying to squeeze too many topics into one course?? Adult, psych, intellectual disability, midwifery, child) The first 3 are 3 DIFFERENT undergrad degrees and the last 2 require a degree in one of the 3 before you can enrol in the course. In my adult (also called general because you work in a GENERAL hospital rather than a psych hospital or maternity hospital) we touched on the other subjects and done short 4 week placements in each of the areas other than what the title of our degree was.
    I was purposefully attempting to make the point of the difference between training and education.
    And i quite agree that the generalist education/training in the USA is hard to meet in the two/three/four year time frame....I think the spelcialist would be the way to go, to maximize the time spent learning
    pagandeva2000, jjjoy, and K+MgSO4 like this.
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    We were required to take a course called 'Computers in Nursing". First day of class we learned how to turn the computer on. The average age of my classmates was 20 something. We actually knew more about computers than our instructor!
    wooh and Faeriewand like this.
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    I've only taken one course that I think will not help me in my career, and it was an elective called "Politics and film." It is beyond me why I took that course.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
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    Quote from gentlegiver
    We were required to take a course called 'Computers in Nursing". First day of class we learned how to turn the computer on. The average age of my classmates was 20 something. We actually knew more about computers than our instructor!
    Did they at least teach you about information systems? Because I think that would be pretty helpful for some who are interested in nursing informatics. I wish my school at least introduced it to us.
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    Just before logging in to allnurses ... I was sitting here at my desk ruminating on a few issues here at my hospital. Suddenly, my thoughts flashed on a concept from a political science course I took in my undergraduate days 34 years ago. It fits perfectly with our current situation and I started thinking about how I can use that concept to help resolve things here at my hospital today.

    I am sure that most of you would think that my course in British Government taken back in 1976 was "unnecessary fluff," -- but I am grateful for my well-rounded, liberal arts education. It helps me to think critically, better understand the world around me, and resolve complex problems for which I can't simply "look up the standard procedure."

    Some people view nursing as a basic job -- and want their nursing education to be just "job training" to prepare someone to be a safe practitioner who can follow established policies. I am glad that I have received more than that in my education -- and that I now have more to offer the profession (and the world) because of that deep and rich liberal arts education.

    If you care about such topics, you should do more research before choosing a nursing program and/or career path. If you don't appreciate a liberal arts foundation and don't want the opportunities that such a foundation provides, then don't choose to go to such a program. Choose a technical program and stay in a technical niche where you will be happy. If you only appreciate the physical sciences, choose a program where that is strongly emphasized. Schools publish their curricula: they are not a secret. Do your homework and then make a choice that will suit you. Don't blame the school unless they fail to provide what they advertise.
    MInurse.st, pers, morte, and 2 others like this.
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    I think the reason why nursing schools nowadays are more "book learning" is because nursing bodies have been pushing advance nursing practice positions that require nurses to get a Masters, PhD or DP.

    I understand what seasoned nurses are saying but at the same time I can't help but think a lot of these "useless" courses have some value to them. I do believe I need more practical time but at the same time, I do not want to let go of my "book learning." This is just a guess but maybe the reason why schools cut practicum times in nursing school is because there's been a huge influx of people wanting to get into nursing. The schools are then competing for placements and so they solve it by cutting practicum time? I don't know.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
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    I'm not saying we should let go of "book learning". I understand that getting a Bachelor's degree mean getting a "well rounded" education. but seriously, some of these courses i can do without. My beef is also with the fact that some schools (mine in particular) spend two semesters teaching one course that are definitely not important! instead of two semester for chemistry or fundamental(which is basically intro to nursing), give me two semesters of something i can actually use like patho or pharm!

    All i'm saying is cut back on some of the "book" stuff and concentrate on clinical. i would much rather have two to three days of clinical than spend four days in class! being in clinical and encountering patients with different problems helps develop my critical thinking skills and puts my nursing process to worl.


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