Letting CNA pass your meds, bad idea? - page 6

I fill the cups and check for all interactions and whatnot, but anyone have any negative experiences or can think of any possible neg exp with this? Thanks... Read More

  1. by   25(2)+2
    i took a course in iowa to pass meds. it was about 2 weeks long. we had to take tests during that 2 weeks, do a paper on a resident and the affects of their meds and pass a state exam, and if we passed the state exam then we had to do 10 hours of clinicals with an RN. If not for any other reason, and there are others more important, i went through training to pass meds and to do it right. CNAs without that training should not be passing meds.
  2. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from casi
    As a CNA with very little med training I really don't think it's our job to be handing out medications. I'd much rather leave it to the nurses who have the education to do it.
    What a statement. Thank you for your honesty Casi. I think your insiders view of the subject is very telling.
    ~Jen
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from casi
    I work in an Assisted Living Facility as a CNA where I pass meds that a preset up in weekly strips that are locked in each resident's apartment. It's my job to check the MAR against what's set up and initial off on what I give. Needless to say I've seen some very stupid med errors on the part of CNAs. I've seen CNAs go into an apartment and get a strip, and somehow take it to someone else's apartment and give it to the wrong resident. PM meds given instead of AM meds. Husband gets both his and his wife's PM meds, and the list could go on.

    As a CNA with very little med training I really don't think it's our job to be handing out medications. I'd much rather leave it to the nurses who have the education to do it.
    When I was a psych tech, I used to give evening meds in the morning also. I didn't appreciate the value of it that much, because I knew that the most they can do is write us up. Now, as a nurse, I would be afraid that someone else may feel the same way I did.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    (I can't believe this was made a sticky)
  5. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from 25(2)+2
    i took a course in iowa to pass meds. it was about 2 weeks long. we had to take tests during that 2 weeks, do a paper on a resident and the affects of their meds and pass a state exam, and if we passed the state exam then we had to do 10 hours of clinicals with an RN. If not for any other reason, and there are others more important, i went through training to pass meds and to do it right. CNAs without that training should not be passing meds.
    Wow. A whole two weeks and a whole ten hours.
  6. by   aileenve
    NEVER
  7. by   dijaqrn
    HRLRN echoed my thoughts exactly! If you look at each of those three strikes as being your grandmother you'll be able to figure out exactly why nurses should be the only ones giving meds!
    I'd love to review the content of a two week CMA course. Do they review labs before giving drugs like Coumadin ? Learned assessment in two weeks?
    These must be great courses, maybe we RN's are spending too much time in school!
    When I did work in LTC med pass times were critical to being able to chart later, you assessed the pts for edema, congestion, changes in mental status etc. Things surely do change but no one is competent to pass meds after a two week course and 1.25 days of clinical!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  8. by   firstaiddave907
    yeah that sounds aganist the law if i where a cna working at that place i would refuse to give the medication and say it wasnt part of my training i had.
  9. by   grace90
    H-E-Double Hockey Sticks-No!
  10. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Quote from TINKERBELL83
    I don't think it is a bad idea.
    That's because you're not a nurse yet and don't have your own license to put on the line. I hope you feel differently when you actually become a nurse and study pharmacology.
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from firstaiddave907
    yeah that sounds aganist the law if i where a cna working at that place i would refuse to give the medication and say it wasnt part of my training i had.
    That's hard to say, really. What if the CNA was offered a bit more pay, or has been at that job for some time, and it became a mandatory requirement? For me, working as a psych tech, it was mandatory. I had not been a nurse and did not value why this is a mistake, so, I just followed suit. Also, it may be that there might be limitations to what medications they can pass. We were not allowed to give injections or narcartics. For me, it was psychotropic medications, colace and vitamins. We were taught how to do dressings as well. Now that I am an LPN, I would say that it is not a safe practice, but I can see how a CNA would receive this additional responsibility if it became a job requirement to retain employment.
  12. by   tammy10221961
    I'm a tech in an Emergency Room. Everyone should know that you have your busy days and your not so busy days.
    On those busy days though, if your assigned to the cardiac section, things can get pretty hairy. If your assigned to the other section you might have a slow day.
    I have witnessed other RN's pull meds for the busy RN's. The busy RN's are greateful for the assistance and doesn't bother to check the meds because they have someone crashing.
    I'm in nursing school now but once I pass my NCLEX I know who will be passing my meds.....ME. Why go through all the educational requirements and expense to have put my license on the line.
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from BlueEyes1022
    I'm a tech in an Emergency Room. Everyone should know that you have your busy days and your not so busy days.
    On those busy days though, if your assigned to the cardiac section, things can get pretty hairy. If your assigned to the other section you might have a slow day.
    I have witnessed other RN's pull meds for the busy RN's. The busy RN's are greateful for the assistance and doesn't bother to check the meds because they have someone crashing.
    I'm in nursing school now but once I pass my NCLEX I know who will be passing my meds.....ME. Why go through all the educational requirements and expense to have put my license on the line.
    I can see how this can happen...a busy atmosphere with the adrenaline working on overload. But, like you said, I would really be afraid.

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