Leaving written report at shift change? - page 2

Just wanted to know if anyone out there has ever been asked to leave a written report for the next nurse at shift change rather than a face to face? It was suggested to me that I do just that tonight... Read More

  1. by   Pepper The Cat
    We have never had face to face report. Always written - now it is computer docoumented. We have several nurses who are always late - if they are coming on, I do not wait for them. As long as there are enough nurses from the next shift present, I leave.
  2. by   P_RN
    And what is the procedure to deal with those nurses who are proverbially LATE and then socialize, show pictures and go get a snack before starting work?

    I've left written report with the charge nurse and made sure she apportioned my patients among her shift who DID bother to come in on time. As far as I know nothing was ever done about the latecomers.
  3. by   vamedic4
    Quote from S.T.A.C.E.Y
    I understand how leaving the patient without a nurse is abandonment, but I have another question.

    The OP said the charge nurse asked her to do this, so my question is, could she have given report to the charge nurse? And, if she gave report to the charge, and left a written copy of the report with the charge to have & pass on to the other nurse would that still be abandonment? Technically, the charge would have the patient assignment, no?
    You are correct STACEY...if the charge nurse is given report (as should happen anyway), then it is understood that an equally trained person has been informed and is caring for the patient. There is no abandonment issue here.
  4. by   CHATSDALE
    i have to agree with the idea that the charge nurse is accepting responsibilty for the patient when she accepts the written report...taped reports are frequently given
    sometimes a nurse has children to pick up or another job to go to and she can't wait on a nurse who is late for what ever reason legit or not
  5. by   AliRae
    I'm interested in the idea of written report as a standard thing. We don't ever do it ... the floors tape, and PICU and NICU give verbal report at the bedside. The only time we write is if the relief is late, in which case the charge covers your kids until the latecomer arrives.

    When those of you from hospitals who always do written report write it out, what does it look like? Do you have forms or a certain format to follow? Please do share ... perhaps we could get a form together for our unit to use when people are late.
  6. by   mydesygn
    Quote from uptoRNin04
    Just wanted to know if anyone out there has ever been asked to leave a written report for the next nurse at shift change rather than a face to face? It was suggested to me that I do just that tonight at shift change since the next nurse was going to be late. I have always been led to believe that this constitutes patient abandonment. What happens if the pt goes bad before the nurse arrives? What if the nurse never shows up? I was asked to do this by the charge nurse on the next shift. My charge nurse, unit manager etc. had all gone home. I said I didn't mind staying. I gave report when she showed up. Just wondered what anyone thought about this? Is this legal?
    I guess I need a little more info. Every facility I have worked at does a written report, a written report is not unusual in the least, some places do taped reports. Are you saying that you were asked to leave a written report and NO ONE was going to assume care of your patients after you leave. If that was the case, it's not just abandonment but outright negligence. However, what usually occurs is a charge nurse (or another staff nurse) assumes care of the patient(s) until the late nurse arrives and that nurse hands off your written report to the arriving nurse. That's not abandonment since the charge nurse has assumed care for the patient. You would give the charge nurse a verbal report as well as the written report prior to leaving.
  7. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from mydesygn
    Are you saying that you were asked to leave a written report and NO ONE was going to assume care of your patients after you leave. If that was the case, it's not just abandonment but outright negligence. However, what usually occurs is a charge nurse (or another staff nurse) assumes care of the patient(s) until the late nurse arrives and that nurse hands off your written report to the arriving nurse. That's not abandonment since the charge nurse has assumed care for the patient. You would give the charge nurse a verbal report as well as the written report prior to leaving.
    At my last place of employment, there was a nurse I often had to give report to that was chronically late. You could bet she would arrive anywhere from 5 - 20 minutes after I was supposed to be GONE. We gave face to face report.

    After complaining to management after about the 10th incident, my manager suggested that I tape or leave written report and JUST LEAVE :trout: He said he "would talk to her". The talking never happened and I was not about to leave two ICU patients without a nurse.

    That, along with other issues, is why they are my EX-employer. It is also why I never felt bad leaving the job after 11 months of being a new grad
  8. by   BittyBabyGrower
    We will write a report if someone is going to be late and then report to the charge nurse and go over what is on the sheet and if anyone needs something in the interim.
  9. by   vamedic4
    Our ER faxes a written report before bringing a pt up, never call, and most of the time all you get is admission diagnosis and vital signs. And they think that's OK........[/QUOTE]

    Oooooh Ooooh....I HAATE THIS PRACTICE!!! Our ER is ALWAYS doing this, and thinking it's okay. Then we call and want specifics...what does this kid sound like...how are his pulses, et cetera...and we get nothing. Half the time you can't ever actually even find the nurse who cared for the kid. When a nurse transports the kid up it's usually "oh, I'm not the nurse who cared for this patient." :angryfire
  10. by   MARIAN202
    There Is A New Standard
    You Must Be Available To Be Asked Questions After The Report
    This Includes A Taped Report
  11. by   MIA-RN1
    ugh I HATE written reports! We usually do them face to face but the other day I came in to have two patients assigned to me that were cared for by a nurse who left two hours earlier! The 'written report' started off with a scrawled "Sorry this sheet is so messy" and got worse from there. Pt #1 was to be d/cd but needed several things accomplished first, so I basically received a messy and disordered list of things to do. Pt #2 had nothing updated on Kardex, I was just kind of left hanging. Supposedly the pts were 'babysat' but nursing staff in general but in so doing, two meds were missed for pt #2 and Pt#1's infant didn't get any circumcision checks. You can BET I was upset and I wrote up the errors. Thankfully the pts were okay but it really started things off wrong. Two hours...give me a break!
  12. by   pedsnrs1
    This is a little different situation but along the same lines. I am a home health nurse and my relief is the parents. We are also required to write a report in the communication book about how our shift went. This makes me uncomfortable because of a nrsg seminar that talked about communication books being made as part of evidence in court. I was told to just stick to the basics and I should be fine. My feeling is oral report is the best. That way any questions can be answered right away. Thankfully in my situation, the parents are terrific at passing on info to the next nurse and my "shift went fine" or "read my nrsg notes" entry is ok in the communication book.

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