Leaving nursing - page 5

This is my first post, but I have been reading the boards for about 2 months now. I need some advice- I am considering leaving nursing after only being out for 2 years. The reasons I'm considering... Read More

  1. by   fayejum
    Quote from nursemjb
    But she has to mention her last two jobs because every application now says that if any section is judged to be untrue or incomplete they can fire you on the spot. So either way you are hosed. I'm going through this right now, too. Plus age discrimination, which I can't prove. Sorry for the pity party......
    I hope you have found a job
    Last edit by fayejum on Jul 21, '06 : Reason: do not want to leave certain infto
  2. by   RedBait
    Quote from nursemjb
    But she has to mention her last two jobs because every application now says that if any section is judged to be untrue or incomplete they can fire you on the spot. So either way you are hosed. I'm going through this right now, too. Plus age discrimination, which I can't prove. Sorry for the pity party......
    I'm pretty sure you don't have to list any job that you didn't complete orientation or probation or at least six months. Someone earlier said get better references, this is worth repeating: get better references. Ask before you list a reference, be sure they can give you a good one. Consider nursing school instructors, but ask first. Good luck, I'm sure there is a perfect job out there for you, keep trying.
  3. by   RedBait
    Quote from nursemjb
    But she has to mention her last two jobs because every application now says that if any section is judged to be untrue or incomplete they can fire you on the spot. So either way you are hosed. I'm going through this right now, too. Plus age discrimination, which I can't prove. Sorry for the pity party......
    Consider applying for a job at the VA. Civilian government jobs pay well, have good benefits, and great retirement. I just got a job two years ago at an Army hosp and I was 58, no problem. The federal government is most careful to not discriminate for any reason.
  4. by   nursemjb
    Quote from fayejum
    I have not reported jobs and no one has ever found out.
    You may have been lucky.....but in my life WHENEVER I do anything wrong I always get caught...some kind of karma thing....I don't know.
    I also don't like to lie or omit, it just bugs me. Except when someone asks you how they look...you tell them fine, even if you think they look like a dog...
    Or are they fat, of course you say NO......
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from RedBait
    Consider applying for a job at the VA. Civilian government jobs pay well, have good benefits, and great retirement. I just got a job two years ago at an Army hosp and I was 58, no problem. The federal government is most careful to not discriminate for any reason.

    Wow..the VA has my respect then in this regard...I had the impression the government enforces age limits in most of their jobs. I do know the application process is very tedious and exact for government jobs and they tend to want to know EVERY detail of the job history. I forgot to list a few 2 month jobs I took that didn't work out and they didn't go for that...many nurse employers want every detail and they of course use that info to benefit them. Like mentioned earlier,if you DO fail to give every detail,and they find out later, they can fire ya on the spot. Most applications here have a signed disclaimer stating we understand this. In an employment-at-will state like mine, we seem to have few rights unless employers violate some gross federal law that can be solidly proven.
  6. by   nursemjb
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Wow..the VA has my respect then in this regard...I had the impression the government enforces age limits in most of their jobs. I do know the application process is very tedious and exact for government jobs and they tend to want to know EVERY detail of the job history. I forgot to list a few 2 month jobs I took that didn't work out and they didn't go for that...many nurse employers want every detail and they of course use that info to benefit them. Like mentioned earlier,if you DO fail to give every detail,and they find out later, they can fire ya on the spot. Most applications here have a signed disclaimer stating we understand this. In an employment-at-will state like mine, we seem to have few rights unless employers violate some gross federal law that can be solidly proven.
    Glad to know that I'm not the only one that knows the scoop in Texas.....there's not enough of a nursing shortage here for employers not to have their nose in the air and be EXTREMELY picky. Age discrimination is almost impossible to prove. I realize I'm feeling sorry for myself, but after six months of this I'm pretty fed up. Though I really want to be a nurse, I'm going to have to consider something else pretty soon.
    Thanks for backing me up on what it's like here......
  7. by   Krissy NY
    You made it through nursing school! You worked in ICU! My gosh I dream of getting through school and working in such a demanding unit!

    Well..if all else fails you can move to New York. We need smart nurses like you with the huge heart you have demonstrated here. Just don't forget to pack your really thick skin and a sense of humor. You are going to need it. If you make it here you can make it anywhere....at least that is what the song says.
  8. by   PACU R/N
    Hi, keep your chin up...remember we nurses are in demand. I must ask though, what amount of nursing practical did you do whilst doing your training? Oh yes you're smart enough...Is there a particular area of nursing you like? Perhaps doing some aged care nursing will help - less pressure. In my area of Western Sydney(Australia), the undergrads don't spend much time in the different areas of nursing.
    During my General Nurse training(was hospital based training, no University then), we had to spend 3 months in each area, working all the shifts. That I feel gave us good grounding to be able to work in any setting. Back to the present, there are clinical specialists and clinical educators in all wards and specialty areas to assist new grads and older nurses returning to the workforce. I don't know how the American system works in hospitals. With the nursing shortages you have, one would think that you would be welcomed with open arms... cheers

    Quote from wandering_rn
    This is my first post, but I have been reading the boards for about 2 months now. I need some advice- I am considering leaving nursing after only being out for 2 years. The reasons I'm considering leaving are numerous. I just don't know if I'm smart enough to be a nurse, and I've been fired from two nursing jobs in a row now- within the space of 3 months. And I can't find another job in the area I'm currently in- after moving accross 3 states to be closer to my family. I'm just so very depressed right now, don't mean to throw myself a pity party. Just wanted to get some suggestions or advice. Thanks
  9. by   mattsmom81
    I'm not sure how far out you are of the DFW area...but there are Medsurg and LTC contracts available through my agency and I know of out of town nurses who commute in for say 3 12 hr shifts and sleep in a hotel. If you would be interested, please PM me and I'll refer you.

    Another option is the doc-in-a-box facilities...who like to hire new grads specifically...I'm thinking of CareNow facilities in particular which always run advertisements in the Star Telegram looking for nurses.

    I can only imagine how hard it is to get your confidence up again after a rough start in nursing...I had 5 yrs of good experiences up north to draw on before I ran into the problems here being a nurse in Texas.

    Pm if you want to talk or if I can help you. (((HUGS)))
  10. by   nursemjb
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I'm not sure how far out you are of the DFW area...but there are Medsurg and LTC contracts available through my agency and I know of out of town nurses who commute in for say 3 12 hr shifts and sleep in a hotel. If you would be interested, please PM me and I'll refer you.

    Another option is the doc-in-a-box facilities...who like to hire new grads specifically...I'm thinking of CareNow facilities in particular which always run advertisements in the Star Telegram looking for nurses.

    I can only imagine how hard it is to get your confidence up again after a rough start in nursing...I had 5 yrs of good experiences up north to draw on before I ran into the problems here being a nurse in Texas.

    Pm if you want to talk or if I can help you. (((HUGS)))
    I'm right in the center of Fort Worth. I really don't want to go to another city because I would need up front money which I don't have. I've sent a resume to Care Now twice with no response.
    I have worked in the OR, med-surg, home health, school, and drug/alcohol rehab. I really hate to say this but I feel that being blackballed twice might be the kiss of death. You are right my confidence is pretty shot. What I am really good at is paperwork, I am one of the wierd people that enjoys it. I used to be an engineer at General Dynamics in the Materials and Processes Lab before I became a nurse, and I really enjoyed experiments and reports, mostly desk work. I also have a degree in Microbiology and a minor in Chemistry but it's very old knowledge since I graduated the first time in 1980.
    Sounds wierd but I was really happy if there hadn't been such awful politics and upheaval in the defense industry.
    What I would really like to do is some sort of case management, mostly a desk job on the 3-11 shift part time. I'm definitely not full time worker material.
    Now you know my story.....pretty pitiful isn't it ????? HA HA
  11. by   hypnotic_nurse
    Have you considered monitoring for a pharmaceutical company? I haven't read the whole thread, so forgive me if I've missed something. It's lots of paperwork and attention to details...and no patient contact. Doesn't require a nursing degree, but they sure like nurses in those positions.
  12. by   nursemjb
    Quote from hypnotic_nurse
    Have you considered monitoring for a pharmaceutical company? I haven't read the whole thread, so forgive me if I've missed something. It's lots of paperwork and attention to details...and no patient contact. Doesn't require a nursing degree, but they sure like nurses in those positions.
    I have never heard of monitoring for a pharmaceutical company. What does the job entail? How do you find out about them? I enjoy paperwork....I used to be a Materials and Processes engineer at General Dynamics in a previous life.....
  13. by   hypnotic_nurse
    A pharmaceutical company places research studies at various sites, both for-profit places and places like universities. Usually the monitor works with several sites doing the same study, and other sites doing other studies with the same drug.

    The monitor's job is to make sure the sites are doing their jobs properly...that they are obtaining proper informed consent, recruiting the right types of patients, that problems are reported quickly both to the pharmaceutical company and the site's human protection program. Also, the monitor makes sure that paperwork is filled out properly, that all adverse events are properly reported and followed up on. It's very detail oriented. Usually there's some travel involved (some within a single state, some multistate or even international, but some are also based solely in large cities or travel between two large cities).

    Finding the jobs can be tricky. One route is through a head-hunter. Another is to contact the pharmaceuticals on your own (Lilly, Astra-Zeneca, Smith-Kline Glaxo, etc.).

    Some monitors do very well financially -- especially the ones who travel a lot. It does tend to be a stressful position, though, especially for those who are not detail oriented.

    If you like a mix of patients and paper, pharmaceutical research trials (also called clinical trials) are another option. Research nursing still requires a lot of detail and paperwork. If you work in a small group, you may get to schedule your own patients and arrange your own day -- but the paperwork is intense for either job (many of us -- not always so jokingly -- say we kill a tree for every patient that we see). I have had studies that used 3 4-inch-binders for each patient we completed.

    In a small group, you also tend to be a jack-of-all-trades; not only do you see the patients, but you make sure everything gets reported to the human protection group, you recruit your patients (this might even entail speaking to groups depending on what you're researching and how difficult it is to find patients). You are responsible for telling your MD what they're supposed to do at each visit, because most of them won't remember. You may be in charge of counting and storing your investigational drugs as well. You also have to work with your monitor to make sure you are doing everything correctly.

    In a larger group, you may be responsible only for your patient visits and paperwork; sometimes for-proft groups have a good support staff that takes on some of the administrative paperwork. For-profit sites may pay less but some offer large bonuses at study end.

    This is a very brief overview, and I know it sounds like a lot. But I find it very interesting, and (other than my 4 shift a month part-time job) it's the only type of nursing I've ever done.

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