Leaving A 2 year contract - HELP

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    I am needing to leave a two year contract with the hospital I am currently with due to my husbands job relocating us. My problem is that I had accepted a sign on bonus to work at this hospital. I have only been here 8 months. Does anyone out there have any experiences with breaking a contract and how to go about this. I am aware that I will need to pay back a portion of the sign on bonus, but I am hoping not all at once. Please give advice. Thanks all.
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  5. 0
    Let me know when you find out. I may be in a similar situation because my husband is in the Army and we may also be relocating. I was told before I accepted my bonus that, in the event I need to leave before my contract obligation is fulfilled, I would have to repay a pro-rated portion. For instance, if I got a bonus of $1200 and stayed only 10 months of a 12 month contractual obligation, then I'd have to repay 2/12ths or $200 of the bonus. I was assuming (and we all know what we do when we assume) that it would be taken out of my last paycheck and cashed in accumulated leave.... Let me know what you find out!
  6. 1
    Quote from MentalRn
    I am needing to leave a two year contract with the hospital I am currently with due to my husbands job relocating us. My problem is that I had accepted a sign on bonus to work at this hospital. I have only been here 8 months. Does anyone out there have any experiences with breaking a contract and how to go about this. I am aware that I will need to pay back a portion of the sign on bonus, but I am hoping not all at once. Please give advice. Thanks all.
    Do you have a legal plan through your work or your husband's? Maybe you could have an attorney take a look at your contract for free.
    lindarn likes this.
  7. 0
    Depends on the specific contract, different employers have different requirements. Some will pro-rate the amount and we have seen some demand the entire amount be returned for the entire two year contract length.

    You are going to have to look at the specifics of what you have signed to see what you will need to do. It should be spelled out directly in what you signed.
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    I received a bill within a short time after leaving for a prorated amount of the original amount. It was payable in full. I didn't dispute it. The debt was secured by a promissory note. Not much else to tell.
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    Yes, there's not much to say. You will be obligated to abide by whatever conditions are specified in the contract you signed.

    Hospitals have very competent, well-paid legal departments that draw up these contracts -- I would not put too much hope in finding a legal loophole or way around or out of the contract ...

    Also, you don't want to leave your current employer on less-than-good terms, because you don't want negative references from them in the future.
    lindarn likes this.
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    Me chiming in again. Just popping in to say what you probably already know. It couldn't hurt to talk with HR about your concerns about terms for repayment. It's not like you're the first employee that left before finishing a contract who didn't have it in a lump sum to pay back. You can state it in terms of a hypothetical question if you haven't yet given notice. I always say go directly to the source for your clarification and the sooner, the better. Less worries.
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    Could your husband negotiate with his employer to see if they'd be willing to pay it for you? If you signed on with your hospital under the belief that he was going to be staying put at least until your contract was up, then they might be willing to help. Wouldn't hurt for him to ask!
    BlueRidgeHomeRN likes this.
  12. 1
    Quote from santhony44
    Could your husband negotiate with his employer to see if they'd be willing to pay it for you? If you signed on with your hospital under the belief that he was going to be staying put at least until your contract was up, then they might be willing to help. Wouldn't hurt for him to ask!
    Good point! -- If his company is paying for or, at least, helping with relocation costs, you could make the argument that this is a legitimate relocation expense ...
    BlueRidgeHomeRN likes this.
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    If you mention about getting a lawyer, most hospitals will drop the case like a hot potato. Hospitals, we know, are extremely afraid of having to deal with lawyers. You don't really have to get a lawyer, just tell them you will have to consult your lawyer or you are thinking about it anyway. They will not want to take the time and spend the money on their lawyers just to get back money from a nurse. Their lawyers will cost more than what they will get back from you. They might call your bluff but you can call theirs first. Just don't expect a good reference unless you ask your charge nurse personally. After all, the quality of your work has nothing to do with bonuses - paid or underpaid or overpaid.

    Good luck. Remember family is a treasure that a lot of nurses don't have. Value and protect yours like a mama or papa bear and their cubs.

    SL


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