Learning Disabled Students - page 5

I'm in nursing school and recently found out that 2 students in my class are "Learning Disabled", meaning, they are allowed extra time to complete the tests, they receive extra help from instructors,... Read More

  1. by   mercyteapot
    I don't have any ADA qualifying conditions; however, my son does. I get to sick to death of the ''that's not fair'' remarks that I hear. I always remember my Mom telling me, anytime that I whined to her about some injustice or the other, that ''life isn't fair''. Boy howdy, it turns out that she was right about that one!
    Last edit by mercyteapot on Mar 28, '08
  2. by   dmarie (GA)
    multicollinarity, it sounds like you've been through a great deal and I can't help but be impressed with your determination and courage. I applaud you for working hard to realize your dream.

    I disagree with your comment that this is a sad thread however, because in my view, it's helped to bring the subject to light with honest discussion.

    Those of us without LD or with undiagnosed LD, sweating and struggling through nursing school without the use of a calculator (or any other special accommodation), it can be frustrating to watch other students use a calculator if we don't understand the specifics about why they are allowed these accommodations.

    Frankly, I don't understand why we ALL are not allowed to use a calculator when the reality is that we can use one on the floor. But as it has been pointed out in this thread, I should leave these questions and solutions to the experts.

    I'm not a nosey student --- but as one of my previous posts describes, I was teamed up with a student during clinical and it was explained to me by my clinical instructor that there existed a learning curve, which ultimately left me doing most of the work and extremely frustrated. Before this incident, I didn't pay much attention to anyone else in the class during exam time as I'm usually so focused on my own exam.

    Someone else pointed out in a previous post that students should worry about themselves and let the nursing school process and NCLEX take care of the rest. I agree.

    Student compassion or dedication to the field of nursing was never in question, for me atleast. Obviously, if a student chooses to take on this particular field, they have huge amounts of compassion, LD or not.

    Thank you to all of the LD folks who so patiently helped to educate those of us non-LD folks on this particular subject throughout the course of this informative thread.
  3. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from dmarie (GA)
    Those of us without LD or with undiagnosed LD, sweating and struggling through nursing school without the use of a calculator (or any other special accommodation), it can be frustrating to watch other students use a calculator if we don't understand the specifics about why they are allowed these accommodations.

    Frankly, I don't understand why we ALL are not allowed to use a calculator when the reality is that we can use one on the floor. But as it has been pointed out in this thread, I should leave these questions and solutions to the experts.
    Sigh.....

    I really want to leave my post at one word, I really do. But I just don't think you really get it. Are or were you seriously sweating without the use of a calculator? Did you really find someone else's use of a calculator unfair or frustrating? Really?

    Do you know, I bet people with LD find the world frustrating. I bet they find having to live with a LD frustrating. I bet they may find THAT unfair.

    If I had to choose, I'd choose not to have a LD, rather than have a LD and receive special accommodations.

    Lucky for me I didn't have to choose.



    As for why you have to learn how to do the math rather than rely on a calculator, well, I think the theory behind that is obvious.


    Many, many times in real world nursing, I have to actually do math, albeit simple math, on the fly. I can't ask the physician to please stop the procedure so that I can run and get a calculator. Or, please give me some time to figure out how to calculate this dosage.

    Sheesh!
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    we have always been allowed to use a calculator in class, but we do have some students with learning disabilities that get extra time on their tests. They take their tests in private rooms at the student services building. I didn't think it was fair at first either, but like someone said...it's really none of my business. I do however have an opinion about some of the practices in regards to students with disabilities...their comes a point in time when every reasonable accomodation has been made and you have an LD student who simply can't do the work. I think that the staff/faculty are afraid to act upon that and dismiss the student from the program because of all the ADA guidelines/laws etc. And in the end, the only person who suffers is the LD student who wastes their time, money, and energy. They may have all the heart in the world, but unfortunately some individual's problems are too complex for the nursing world. It is this I have a problem with, not LD students in general who simply need some extra time for a written test or a private room.
  5. by   Multicollinearity
    I don't know about the calculator issue. I only had extended time on exams, and there in class. I guess I don't know about the realities of those who use a calculator on nursing math exams...since it's not my issue. I guess I just figure those in charge who know more than I do - that they know what they are doing with these students. I can't underestand everything, so I'll keep my nose out of it.
  6. by   dmarie (GA)
    cardiacRN2006: I really want to leave my post at one word, I really do. But I just don't think you really get it. Are or were you seriously sweating without the use of a calculator? Did you really find someone else's use of a calculator unfair or frustrating? Really?
    Yes! It makes me extremely nervous when I have to take a math exam and pass it with 100% accuracy without the use of a calculator. I would love the use of a calculator on a test. But I'm not allowed to use one.


    cardiacRN2006: As for why you have to learn how to do the math rather than rely on a calculator, well, I think the theory behind that is obvious.
    I agree!

    cardiacRN2006: Many, many times in real world nursing, I have to actually do math, albeit simple math, on the fly. I can't ask the physician to please stop the procedure so that I can run and get a calculator. Or, please give me some time to figure out how to calculate this dosage.
    My point exactly!
  7. by   Multicollinearity
    I do hope you are beginning to understand that taking an exam is different than performing in the work world.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Mar 28, '08
  8. by   dmarie (GA)
    asoldierswife05: I do however have an opinion about some of the practices in regards to students with disabilities...their comes a point in time when every reasonable accomodation has been made and you have an LD student who simply can't do the work. I think that the staff/faculty are afraid to act upon that and dismiss the student from the program because of all the ADA guidelines/laws etc. And in the end, the only person who suffers is the LD student who wastes their time, money, and energy. They may have all the heart in the world, but unfortunately some individual's problems are too complex for the nursing world. It is this I have a problem with, not LD students in general who simply need some extra time for a written test or a private room.
    EXACTLY my point.
  9. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from dmarie (GA)
    Yes! It makes me extremely nervous when I have to take a math exam and pass it with 100% accuracy without the use of a calculator. I would love the use of a calculator on a test. But I'm not allowed to use one.

    Sigh...You completely missed my point.


    Those with LD find a way to accommodate. They know what works for them and when they need to do to succeed. You, without LD, should just stop being concerned with other people are doing or needing.
    Last edit by cardiacRN2006 on Dec 9, '06 : Reason: To add quotes
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    When I returned to college and needed extended exam time that first semester, I decided that I would NEVER tell a single classmate my story like I did here in this thread. The attitudes expressed here tell me that my decision to keep this all private at school was the correct one.
  11. by   dmarie (GA)
    multicollinarity, please allow me to add a post-script to my previous post in which I thanked all of the LD folks for helping others understand this subject. Thank you to all of the posters, those with LD's and those without LD's, those with relatives with LD's, and those without relatives with LD's, those educated on the subject of LD's, and anybody in between who has contributed to this thread.

    My intention was/is not to offend you or anyone else, in any category, with my honest inquiries. And the post that you are referring to is one in which I was trying to calm the feeling of defensiveness that seems to have taken a life of it's own here.
  12. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from dmarie (GA)
    multicollinarity, please allow me to add a post-script to my previous post in which I thanked all of the LD folks for helping others understand this subject. Thank you to all of the posters, those with LD's and those without LD's, those with relatives with LD's, and those without relatives with LD's, those educated on the subject of LD's, and anybody in between who has contributed to this thread.

    My intention was/is not to offend you or anyone else, in any category, with my honest inquiries. And the post that you are referring to is one in which I was trying to calm the feeling of defensiveness that seems to have taken a life of it's own here.
    Ok, we're done here. Maybe others can give you ideas on how to handle clinicals with this other student.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Dec 10, '06
  13. by   dmarie (GA)
    Again, let me refer back to one of my earlier posts in which I pointed out that other students' accommodations didn't come to my attention until I was teamed up with a student and was told that because of the learning curve I might be able to help her along. This created extra work for me and was beyond frustrating.

    Before that, I didn't even notice that she was allowed the use of a calculator and extra time to take the test.

    My original point was that it scared me, after seeing her perform in clinical, to know that she was being helped along, especially with drug calculations. But --- whatever. If the powers that be feel she is doing well, then so be it.

    And yes, originally, my first reaction was that it wasn't fair (sorry, this was my original reaction) for this student to have a different set of criteria for progression through the program. In my mind, you either do the work like everybody else, or you don't make it through the program. Period.

    After reading the various posts here, I see that this certainly doesn't apply to all LD students. I've learned a great deal on this thread about the subject, and I sincerely thank those who have contributed.

    I completely agree with the statement that these situations are never black/white.

    I'm just trying to squeek out my own degree, which by the way does NOT come easily, and get the heck out of there.

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