lazy preceptor I need help

  1. 0
    Hello:
    I finally got a job after 5 months searching as a new graduate. I have a job that I like in a rural clinic, nice schedule, nice pay, I get one hour lunch (even when I dont know when lunch time might be 2pm,3pm). The place is very disorganized. Two of their nurses have work in that place for about 10 years and my preceptor had work in that place for about 6 yrs, but has being a nurse for 25 yrs has a lot of experience. My preceptor basically runs the place, gets on people's faces, tell physician what to do, flirt with the clerks, sits and chat a looottt with the rest of the staff. He gets things done slooowwly, but gets them done, never wash his hands, dont use two patients identifiers to make sure that is the right patient. I am stuck! with this preceptor because the other 2 nurses dont want to be my preceptors. This preceptor looks at me weird when I follow hand washing, two patients identifiers and educate patients for discharge, but I spend about 5 hours at day doing nothing at all because this lazy preceptor will just sit around, and by the end and when he decides starts getting things done, so I get to practice a few of my skills. My training should be done in 4 more weeks, but I am afraid to get into an argument with this lazy preceptor that believes he runs and owns the clinic. What should I do. I really need the job and is very difficult to find a job as a new grad.
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  4. 11 Comments so far...

  5. 20
    Your last sentence says it all. You need the job. Don't be concerned with his poor example. Soon enough you can pay more attention to your own work and your own standards. Don't let him drag you down or run you off.
    canoehead, Ginger80, happy2learn, and 17 others like this.
  6. 5
    I learned VERY quickly my very first nursing job just because seasoned experienced mentors do something does not make it OK. I had an older RN (I'm a LPN and was a new grad at that) as a preceptor that did things I knew weren't OK but she would make excuses (ie. we have to start med pass 2 hrs early or we will never get it done, ppl dont really do that around here because it takes to long..etc). Do what YOU know to be right and he will get his in the end who cares what he or anyone thinks. It's your license no one elses. CYA!!
    JustaGypsy, netglow, nurse2033, and 2 others like this.
  7. 2
    I'll jump on the bandwagon - LOL! I'm in my first job as an RN and basically during my orientation/preceptorship at this job - I learned more of what NOT to do than what I KNOW is right to do. Take it as a learning experience, even if it is a study in what not to do and then once you are on your own, do what you KNOW is right...

    It's unfortunate that you are not able to practice your skills. Eventually, you will be able to put your knowledge to work. There will hopefully be a few times when you will be able to pick up some good tips and hints from the staff.

    I wish you luck!
    AtomicWoman and tiredstudentmom like this.
  8. 3
    My instructor gave us advice: Even if your first job is not a perfect fit for you, stay at it for at least a year and put up with it as much as you can. That way you gain experience and you don't look bad on your resume
  9. 0
    You listed all the things not to do as a nurse....good for you for being aware of it. Get through the training, learn the flow of the clinic because you sound as though you already have the nurse part down. Once you are on your own, you can perform the correct way.
    Best of luck to you!
  10. 1
    Make it through orientation, then practice what you know is right after you are no longer tied to your preceptor. Your patients and colleagues will notice your work ethic
    canoehead likes this.
  11. 8
    Quote from topacio
    hello:
    i finally got a job after 5 months searching as a new graduate. i have a job that i like in a rural clinic, nice schedule, nice pay, i get one hour lunch (even when i dont know when lunch time might be 2pm,3pm). the place is very disorganized. two of their nurses have work in that place for about 10 years and my preceptor had work in that place for about 6 yrs, but has being a nurse for 25 yrs has a lot of experience. my preceptor basically runs the place, gets on people's faces, tell physician what to do, flirt with the clerks, sits and chat a looottt with the rest of the staff. he gets things done slooowwly, but gets them done, never wash his hands, dont use two patients identifiers to make sure that is the right patient. i am stuck! with this preceptor because the other 2 nurses dont want to be my preceptors. this preceptor looks at me weird when i follow hand washing, two patients identifiers and educate patients for discharge, but i spend about 5 hours at day doing nothing at all because this lazy preceptor will just sit around, and by the end and when he decides starts getting things done, so i get to practice a few of my skills. my training should be done in 4 more weeks, but i am afraid to get into an argument with this lazy preceptor that believes he runs and owns the clinic. what should i do. i really need the job and is very difficult to find a job as a new grad.
    i'm not sure what it is that seems to make every new grad think they're preceptor is stupid or lazy or has a bad attitude or sets a bad example. you really haven't given us any facts that make me believe your preceptor is a lazy or bad -- just a bunch of opinions. that in and of itself may be a reason the other two nurses don't want to be your preceptor.

    if you're in a small rural clinic, your preceptor probably knows everyone who comes in, their ancestors and their descendants. that may be a reason he's not checking two patient identifiers. or maybe he is checking them -- so subtly and so quickly it's flying under your radar. as far as him "looking at you weird when you follow handwashing" -- are you simply washing your hands? or are you making a bfd about it? if you're washing your hands while announcing it to the world, counting the seconds and explaining how important good handwashing is, i can see why he's looking at you weird.

    and perhaps the 'lazy preceptor" is just "sitting around" because he's waiting for you to get with the program, take some initiative and start trying to manage the workload on your own. you are doing that, aren't you? you realize that in a few weeks you won't have a precptor to fall back on and you will be doing all the work.

    without having met either you or the preceptor, i'm sympathizing with him. i hope you're coming across as a mature, independent nurse at work. try to have a talk with your preceptor -- could be he has as many complaints about you as you have about him, and the only way you're going to work them out is to talk to him.
    exnavygirl-RN, canoehead, CMCRN, and 5 others like this.
  12. 0
    Just try to learn the good thing this preceptor might be able to teach you and once you are on your own you can make sure you wash ur hands every time you have patient contact, make sure you educate patients and family members, etc etc... in no time you will be taking your own decisions and you wont feel frustrated =)

    Congrats on the new job
  13. 0
    I once took a job on a neuro surgical unit. My preceptor had given her notice, and the last big thing she was to do was train me in. I had nursing experience, but none on a unit like this, so I needed unit specific training. I found out quickly that I wasn't learning anything from her, and took the I will figure it out, or ask questions as I go. I am sorry I did that. I kept the job, but never felt completely confident. What I should have done, and recommend you do - is complain, you need good and proper training. If she refuses, then someone else should do that. btw I worked at that job for a year, and moved out of state. I was very glad to be away from that job. On my next job, I was "trained" by a nurse, who I had train. (She was fired the next week, because she didn't know what she was doing). I put my foot down and refused to train with her again, (I only got 2 days training). The other nurse went ballistic, and didn't want to talk to me, but I followed her anyway. It was either repeat the last experience, or take another job without training. I wasn't about to do that to myself again. Now it's years later, and that nurse and I get along quite well.

    On the other side, I have had to train people in who have no desire to watch, listen or work. They are such a drag to be around. You are always having to say come over here and look at this, translated (wake up from your long cat nap and do something.)

    Then I've had to train people who are diva's looking for a fight. They want to prove they are the best ever, defiently better than me. I really like watching those people struggle with their over the top skills when thrown on to the floor.

    Where are the people like you, who want to be trained?


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