kicked out nrsing school-would u fight? - page 5

Help I was 5 days from finishing my first year nursing and got bounced. i must go on record as not being the most beloved person in the class. the staff in a manner of speaking, hates my guts. i... Read More

  1. by   Gromit
    Quote from Dixiedi
    IMHO...
    "I never made an error in med admin. no problem there. i just couldnt draw up the med. without air bubbles (sigh)."

    Air bubbles in the syringe is an error. Ask anybody.
    No, it is not. NOT unless you administer these contents (including the air) into a patient. It should be an automatic action to clear the small amount of air in a syringe, before injecting the contents.
    As long as you clear the air first, then WHAT is the error?
  2. by   Dixiedi
    When we are students everything is graded on the best answer. Anything less than the best answer is wrong. Think about the multiple choice questions on the NCLEX.
    The correct answer is.
    Draw up a like amt of air into the syringe, inject it into the air space in the btl (not into the medication) and then move the needle tip into the medication, the syringe will air free.
    This is the only best answer.
    Yes, sometimes, since we are not perfect, we will get a bit of air into the syringe. Hold it up, tap the air to the neede and push it out. However, this is not the best answer, it is a correct answer, but not the best.
    As students, you must be able to perform the best answer at least sometimes or you will get that "question" wrong. That's the difference!
  3. by   mother/babyRN
    Get a lawyer and inform them of same...
  4. by   bluesky
    The whole point is, that students aren't expected to do everything right the first time. After all, what is the instructor there for, then? This may be an exception, but I was always taught to keep the air bubble in Lovenox, for example. I was also taught that aspirating air is OK as long as you get rid of it with the finger-flick-eject-o-matic move before you inject into to the patient. Again, I totally agree with all those who state that you need to see a lawyer, though. You may want to lighten up on the "I have 2 degrees and you're just threatned by me" strategy because honestly that isn't going to move anyone to empathize further with your case. I stopped bragging about my previous degree in physiology and neurobiology when after 2 interviews cum bragging... I wasn't offered any jobs and got the glassy eyed oh brother look after making the statement. These days I don't even put it on my resume. New-gradship is like a hazing period in which you are not allowed to have any real knowledge or competence in anything....unless you were a tech on a similar unit and even that experience needs to be used wisely. If you act like you know something the wrath of God will come upon you.
  5. by   mattsmom81
    The answer I like best is to go in with a learning attitude and ask what went wrong and be open to the answers. You've told us your side but we haven't heard theirs.

    Then, if you still want to be a nurse after considering their answers, go to a different school, excel and be successful. Best wishes.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    but it needs to still be acknowledged that there are monster instructors and will try to weed people out of the program. my instructors were brutal, especially towards the adult students (30's/40's/50's). they bullied us to no end, i would guess they did this in their perception of only the strong will survive.

    between students flunking out, communication barriers and quitting, there was only around 1/3 of us remaining when we graduated. if an instructor decides she doesn't like you, it's going to make your schooling that much more difficult.
  7. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from earle58
    but it needs to still be acknowledged that there are monster instructors and will try to weed people out of the program. my instructors were brutal, especially towards the adult students (30's/40's/50's). they bullied us to no end, i would guess they did this in their perception of only the strong will survive.
    between students flunking out, communication barriers and quitting, there was only around 1/3 of us remaining when we graduated. if an instructor decides she doesn't like you, it's going to make your schooling that much more difficult.
    Have to agree with you and it is a bummer. However, I can see where the instructors are coming from. There are many personality types that would not be able to complete and they are just taking up space.
    I DO NOT KNOW, nor do I pretend to make an assumption about the original poster here, I am only saying that I see where the instructors are coming from IN GENRAL. Not saying they are right, wrong or anyting else. But... it's their game, play it or get out.
  8. by   moonlite48
    I wrote a few weeks ago with a similar problem. I followed the appeal process with no luck. Just last week I e-mailed the director and asked her for a list of reasons why I failed clinical because I am not clear what they are. The response I received was one sentence,"you have all your papers". I find it amazing that some of you mention in your letters that a student shouldn't know everything. Every question I asked during clinical was answered "you should know that by now". I quit asking because I thought I would flunk out for not knowing, so I looked everything up or asked one of the friendly nurses on the floor so I wouldn't have to ask the instructor. I worked so hard and at 57 yrs old every month counts as far as going to another school, fighting etc. I have a family to support also, and I can't afford a lawyer. Keep us posted. Any answer you find may help me or someone else....I will pray for you.
  9. by   ERHack
    Ive said it once, and Ill say it a thousand times again. "nurses eat their young". why is that? Do what I say Im going to do when the crap's hit the fan again, and I'm feeling like a way out. "Screw nursing, Im gonna work at Starbucks! At least they get tips sometimes..."

    No seriously, keep fighting for what you want. If you want to be a nurse bad enough, you will make it (though it may be through a different program). Good luck, mucho prayers out to ya.
  10. by   moonlite48
    At my age the meat is pretty tough so lunch wouldn't be good anyway! Screw Starbucks! ..........I want it bad enough! I'll find a way.
  11. by   nursyperson
    As a nursing instructor, I feel the need to respond to the described plight you have experienced. Students and instructors are all human beings, and sometimes we 'get along' better with some students than others. Dealing with student personalities is much like dealing with patient personalities. You have a job to do and the instructor(nurse) must find to best method to accomplish this. Personalities play an important part in building relationships, not only in the school setting, but in the work setting. It has been my experience that those who have difficulty with relationships in school often have difficulty in work relationships.

    As I read your posting, I made note of a few things that concerned me. First of all, you have two masters degrees...that should mean that you have experience in learning and disciplining yourself and your instructors actually may have expected more of you, rather than less. Nursing is so totally different from other fields that other degrees are not as applicable to learning nursing skills, etc. Have your previous degrees not brought satisfaction into your life? How will a degree in nursing help you? What is your goal? You also stated that in your life 'doors have been closed more than open' and 'I am not the most beloved person in class' and other comments that may indicate a less than positive self-concept. I am not saying that you may not have some validity to your complaints, but you may want to do some self-examination. How did you present yourself to the faculty? What could you have done differently? I cannot believe that your dismissal was all about drawing up medication with air bubbles. Schools have policies (refer to your student handbook) about disabilities, what behaviors are considered unprofessional and unsafe, and the procedures for counseling, probation, and dismissal.

    I was also concerned about the comment about 'use of ada issues to exploit my disability'. What do you mean by the term 'exploit'? Does the school owe you? You may want to review the defense mechanism 'projection' As hyperstudent wrote, you seem to see yourself as a victim, and that there may be more to this story that you do not choose to see.
  12. by   judymai
    Quote from hotcoffee1
    Help

    I was 5 days from finishing my first year nursing and got bounced. i must go on record as not being the most beloved person in the class. the staff in a manner of speaking, hates my guts. i have clinical with a woman hell-bent on getting me kicked out. she has earned the name of dracula's daugher (AKA DD) from the clinical group. she is less than supportive, and when i asked for guidance regarding a straight cath (i anticipated a pt requiring one, no experience) she told me to read the book. (you get the picture, right?)

    The last 5 weeks of class are med-surg in ortho. we got our first two patients the third clinical day. (i was not given a patient the first day of clinical--he never materialized from the OR) I happen to have an essental tremor. i found this out in lab first semester, when trying to draw up a meds my first semester. i sought care from my physician who placed me on lopressor. it has helped tremendously. I advised the staff.

    Clinical was torture. we were required to fill out the paperwork described in the syllabus as well as additional forms introduced by DD. we recorded VS in 4 different places. If you did meds for the rotation, it was virtually impossible to finish on time (all my meds were administered late), and many of my classmates failed to accomplish this.

    My first patient had alzheimers, total hip, and was combative. i fell behind schedule in performing his care. a future clinical instructor was shadowing DD and helped me with this patient. we fell behind DD's written schedule. I made the assumption that the shadow had a some authority and i took directions from her. I was later told that i was late emptying drains, and did not adhere to the schedule of care. i was told this was MY patient and I screwed up the timeframe for emptying foley and a hemovac. (i had never done either skill up to this day). The most EMBARASSING error I made (yes dear reader, i will tell you) was not telling the nurse in charge of the patient, that the wrong IV fluid was hanging (we had IV and foley training post these incidents). We had the postoperative lecture describing the tasks necessary for post op care after four patient care days. i didnt hang the fluid, which was not ordered and also incorrectly documented on the patient's flowsheet). DD found the error and told me to tell the nurse................and god, i forgot (i told the nurse 1.5 hrs later). I admitted my error in postop conference (there was never a preop conf) and got reamed (understandably). Had I kept my mouth shut, i would have escaped probation. THEN my other grievous error is reaching out of an isolation room to grab my clipboard. Ok i have dumped all the big ones. Remember the tremor? Well yesterday when they dumped me, they told me that I didnt have the motor skills to do the job. I never made an error in med admin. no problem there. i just couldnt draw up the med. without air bubbles (sigh).

    it's hard to write this stuff up. i'll let this stand and wait for your comments. remember the agenda is to get rid of me......................there is no support whatsoever. i worked hard to get to this point and these creepy, unprincipled women have pushed me out.

    your input most appreciated.

    hotcoffee1

    PS there is a guy who has been put on probation last semester for a med. error, who made a med error this session. nothing happened
    As with the previous post, I am a nursing instructor. I have been watching this thread with curiousity and sadness. I am disappointed in the negative tone it has taken overall. I can't help but wonder what value many see in their nursing edcuation and preparation to be nurses if their nursing programs were so terrible.

    I've been waiting to see if the original poster (hotcoffee) would answer the question about what type of program he/she (I can't tell gender by the posts) was enrolled in. For sake of discussion, let me propose that it was an ADN program. "I was 5 days from finishing my first year nursing and got bounced"--- I have taught in two different ADN programs, and for both the successful completion of the first year requires the ability to provide complete care for at least two stable patients (often three). Items like emptying foleys and drains, confirming that the correct IV solution is hanging (whether you hung it or not), and understanding isolation precautions are early responsibilities in the first year. In addition, I know of no college that would allow students to care for a post-op patient without a preparing (on paper) for what to expect for the type of surgery they had. HC admits "we were required to fill out the paperwork described in the syllabus as well as additional forms introduced by DD" I can only assume these were to help prepare for the needs of the patient and plan for providing care.
    This student reports "i was late emptying drains, and did not adhere to the schedule of care. i was told this was MY patient and I screwed up the timeframe for emptying foley and a hemovac. (i had never done either skill up to this day). The most EMBARASSING error I made (yes dear reader, i will tell you) was not telling the nurse in charge of the patient, that the wrong IV fluid was hanging (we had IV and foley training post these incidents). We had the postoperative lecture describing the tasks necessary for post op care after four patient care days. i didnt hang the fluid, which was not ordered and also incorrectly documented on the patient's flowsheet). DD found the error and told me to tell the nurse................and god, i forgot (i told the nurse 1.5 hrs later). As a clinical instructor on a surgical floor, I would be quite concerned by this scenario. I would certainly not address it in post-conference in the presence of other students (I'm not sure if other students were present), but it would certainly be discussed with attempts at problem solving.

    "I never made an error in med admin. no problem there. i just couldnt draw up the med. without air bubbles (sigh)" Sorry, this is an error in our program. Let me clarify that a student would not be removed from the program for this ifthey are able to recognize it as a problem and correct it. This involves probelm solving on the part of the student - as does providing care within timeframes, understanding responsibility for everthing "connected" to your patient (drains, catheters, IV fluids, etc.).

    We are hearing only one side of the story. The student admits to being on probation and it would be interesting to know just how many issues arose after the probation was initiated. I know that both programs I've taught for are excellent and very cautious to respect student rights. The NLN and State Boards of Nursing monitor probation and suspension requirements and assure that students are aware of course and clinical expectations up front. If this students program has not followed these written guidelines, he/she has every reason to appeal.
  13. by   hotcoffee1
    my goodness all the analysis. ok by me. i have a masters in business economics and i belong to a laboratory discipline. i was in telecommunications as a business woman. made it to management at the fortune 50 level. the lab was not my thing. my bs is in social work. i practiced that as a vietnam era vet stateside doing psy crisis intervention. i know about the human heart and that it is nonexistent here. the latest development, is that i have caught them altering my evaluation. im lying in wait. hope overall to be reinstated. there's a secure place for me in nursing. i have a couple of hip surgeries pending and i need a secure place to park. secure, flexible and one that allows me to give to people. i didnt get a family in life, and there is love to give.



    Quote from nursyperson
    As a nursing instructor, I feel the need to respond to the described plight you have experienced. Students and instructors are all human beings, and sometimes we 'get along' better with some students than others. Dealing with student personalities is much like dealing with patient personalities. You have a job to do and the instructor(nurse) must find to best method to accomplish this. Personalities play an important part in building relationships, not only in the school setting, but in the work setting. It has been my experience that those who have difficulty with relationships in school often have difficulty in work relationships.

    As I read your posting, I made note of a few things that concerned me. First of all, you have two masters degrees...that should mean that you have experience in learning and disciplining yourself and your instructors actually may have expected more of you, rather than less. Nursing is so totally different from other fields that other degrees are not as applicable to learning nursing skills, etc. Have your previous degrees not brought satisfaction into your life? How will a degree in nursing help you? What is your goal? You also stated that in your life 'doors have been closed more than open' and 'I am not the most beloved person in class' and other comments that may indicate a less than positive self-concept. I am not saying that you may not have some validity to your complaints, but you may want to do some self-examination. How did you present yourself to the faculty? What could you have done differently? I cannot believe that your dismissal was all about drawing up medication with air bubbles. Schools have policies (refer to your student handbook) about disabilities, what behaviors are considered unprofessional and unsafe, and the procedures for counseling, probation, and dismissal.

    I was also concerned about the comment about 'use of ada issues to exploit my disability'. What do you mean by the term 'exploit'? Does the school owe you? You may want to review the defense mechanism 'projection' As hyperstudent wrote, you seem to see yourself as a victim, and that there may be more to this story that you do not choose to see.

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