Job Hunting - I don't understand

  1. I am just curious and I don't want to sound evil, but recently I have had nurses come into my facility in jeans and t-shirts asking if we have any jobs available and then want to interview immediately.

    I also receive calls from individuals looking for jobs who often speak to me in a rude manner as if I owed them something.

    Keep in mind I try to be as pleasant as possible - REALLY! But is this something that a nurse, or any professional is now doing? I understand that there may be a shortage, but professionalism still counts for something, doesn't it?

    Please help me to help you.

    Thanks.

    P.S. I have been recruiting for 9 years now, but mostly corporate, this is my first time in healthcare.
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  2. 84 Comments

  3. by   mamason
    I don't think this is the norm. If it is, then it shouldn't be. When I applied for my last job, I wore dress slacks, blouse, etc. I really wanted to make a good impression. I came prepared with resume and was willing to answer any questions as professionally as possible. I think the kind of lax attitude you're talking about could be a precurser to the type of employee that they may be. Just my 2 cents.:wink2:
  4. by   Rnandsoccermom
    "Professionals" should go to an interview dressed as a professional in my opinion. This is part of what makes nursing look bad, sorry to say.
  5. by   P_RN
    My first hospital job I'd been sitting in the ICU waiting room all night with my husband when his sister was gravely ill.

    About 10 am I said to him that I thought I'd go pick up an application. I was tired, tear stained, hair a mess etc. The DON asked me where I had been, was I sick?

    I told her what was going on and she said let's talk. Bottom line I got the job. First find out if the applicant has a reason for their appearance. Sometimes there is more to the story. OTOH rudeness is NEVER appropriate.
  6. by   llg
    This type of unprofessional behavior has become more common in recent years and many people are upset about it. It seems as if some people assume that because there is a nursing shortage, they no longer have to "sell themselves" when job hunting. Unfortunately, some hospitals are tolerating such behavior, which encourages it.

    While I agree that there are sometimes legitimate reasons for an unprofessional appearance, it should not be acceptable unless there is indeed a special reason for it. We should not allow such things to become the norm for our profession.

    llg
  7. by   ncriverrat
    When I went for my interview, I dressed nicely. An RN on the floor at the time told me that I looked very nice, and I must have got sort of a weird look on my face. I mean I was dressed nice, but I didn't think it was nice enough for such a nice comment. My manager then told me that sooo many people come to interviews or wanting a job in sweat pants, etc. I thought she was kidding for a minute, but she was totally serious.
  8. by   Antikigirl
    Come in jeans and you have little chance of me hiring you! It is a old fashioned (I guess) code of conduct/work ethic situation I was taught!

    For even just getting an applications I wear professional clothing, no scrubs or causal wear!!!! This is my first impression, so I want it to be good!

    I come in to interview with interview clothes, specifically chosen for color and conservitive style. I only wear one set of modest earrings, and my makeup is neutral. I bring in a briefcase to show professionism, and a notebook for my questions and to take notes. I also have a spare resume with me in case they don't have it, a list of all my contacts, and extra letters of recomendations/evaluations for them if they wish. ALSO, I have a thank you note at the ready so I can write it when I am in the car after the interview and mail it on my way home. I also always take their card!

    This is professional! And it shows! Anything less to me is not professional enough to represent me as a professional Nurse!
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    Maybe it's because of the way I was brought up, but I always wore my best clothing even when doing nothing but INQUIRING about jobs. It never hurts to be prepared to interview, and that's happened more than once when I've gone into a business to pick up an application........not only got interviewed, but hired on the spot!

    By contrast---and I'm sorry, but I have to confess this---when someone walks into MY building to ask for an application looking as though they just crawled out of bed, their app sort of gets "lost" in transit from my desk to my boss's.

    I'm not talking about applicants who get their clothes from Goodwill instead of Macy's. I don't care about that---heck, I buy some of MY stuff there as well! I mean those who wear pajama bottoms and T-shirts, don't bother to comb their hair, and walk in barefooted........or worse, bring their children in with them! That tells me they a) don't care how they look, b) probably won't care how the RESIDENTS look, and c) have child care problems that may interfere with their work. There are too many people out there who really WANT to work, for me to go to the trouble of hiring and training people who are too lazy even to make a good first impression.
  10. by   neetnik461
    pupnshnooter wrote:

    I understand that there may be a shortage, but professionalism still counts for something, doesn't it?
    Absolutely!! I agree wholeheartedly whith everything said on this post. But . . may I make another observation? Professionalism needs to count on both ends . . on the end of the prospective employee and end of the prospective employer.

    Let me explain:

    I have been a nurse for a little over a year and am currently in the process of transferring to another job within the system. I was a stay at home mom for 18 years before going back to college so I was out of the loop regarding interviewing etc. My husband has been in the corporate world for over 20 years and has experience with recruitment and interviewing. Everything my husband told me to expect regarding how the prospective employer should act in an interview/job opportunity situation has not held up one bit in the "nursing/healthcare" world. My husband is completely perplexed by the lack of professionalism on the part of HR and recruiters I have dealt with and basically throws up his hands and says "nursing obviously is different".

    Here's some examples:

    1. In my first position I was never given a written offer to consider, I was simply given some generalities regarding the job and expected to accept or decline over the phone. Once the job was accepted then I would receive a written offer. This offer came one month after I started my orientation period?

    2. The current job I am transferring to has been a nightmare of unprofessionalism when working with HR/recruitment.

    -After interviewing on the spot at an RN open house I went away with the expectation that the NM, HR and others would confer together and let me know if they where interested in me as a candidate. If so I would then talk to my current NM regarding a transfer. When the recruiter received my thank you note from the interview she called and asked if I had spoken to my NM yet about a transfer? She just assumed I knew they were going to go ahead with me as a candidate based on their "enthusiasm" at the nurse open house.

    -Once I spoke to my NM and requested a transfer the phone tag began. It took me a week of unanswered phone messages before I finally got in touch with the recruiter to confirm that she had gotten my message and that the transfer process had begun.

    -Three weeks after the interview at the RN open house I still did not have a formal job offer or tentative start date. My current NM was requesting a resignation letter with effective termination date so that he could go ahead with the hiring process of another candidate waiting to take my position. After a week of unaswered phone messages to the recruiter in which I explained my situation and how things were being held up, in desperation I called the NM at the new job and asked him to help me out. The ball got rolling after that and two days later I was given a start date and a verbal offer which I accepted. I was told that the written offer was in the recruiter's hand and would be mailed that day.

    -On week later I had to play phone tag again because the written offer never showed up in my mailbox. A couple of days later I got a call back and was told to "wait a couple more days" to see if the written offer came in the mail,(because the recruiter had given this responsibility to her assistant) if not call the recruiter . . .again. The written offer didn't come, I called again . . and as of this moment I have received an email of the formal offer but nothing in the mail.

    My husband thinks it is "totally unacceptable" that I have to hound this recruiter to keep things on track and I agree. This non-professional behavior of the recruiter reflects badly on the entire facility. I'm trying to keep positive regarding the new job position though.

    Unfortunately, in general, both my experiences with hospital/nurse recruiters have been that they need to be hounded and tend to leave the prospective employees in the dark regarding protocols for hiring.

    I hope you will bring corporate professionalism into your nurse recruitment role . . because it is sorely needed! You can help your prospective employees through clear and consistent communication regarding the hiring process. Good Luck!!
  11. by   Pupnshnooter
    Quote from neetnik461
    pupnshnooter wrote:

    I hope you will bring corporate professionalism into your nurse recruitment role . . because it is sorely needed! You can help your prospective employees through clear and consistent communication regarding the hiring process. Good Luck!!
    I am sorry for what you have gone through. In my opinion, if this department is treating you this way now, I can't imagine what it would be like when you actually worked there. This behavior, to me is unacceptable.

    I have been told that people have accepted positions at my organization just because of the rapport I built with them BEFORE they accepted. I also make it a point to see how they are doing along the way. It upsets me that many HR people don't put the HUMAN part into their position. Maybe I am unique (OK I am unique, but....:wink2: ) but i think it needs to be a give and take.

    I see that you all agree in profesional dress and mannerisms. I just don't understand how I can consider someone, regardless if they are the best thing since sliced bread for a position when they were "just in town" or "I am interviewing a couple of companies and...." before they even say hello!
  12. by   Antikigirl
    i so agree with the professionlism on the other end as well! I have totally said 'loose my application' when I have entered some places and saw their written roles for RN, pay scale, and once...meeting the Doc at a clinic (oh man she was a nut, and was trying to sell me some pyramid scam vitamins! AND they called and offered me a job! LOL!!!!!!!! She also said during the interview that nurses shouldn't be paid as much as they do, and only offered my 16 bucks an hour full time...I have been a nurse 7 years and expected a bit more...her loss!).

    I also tend to seek out and talk to a nurse on the floor to ask questions (this is my norm) to really get the gist of working there, or even ask for a day to follow to see if this is the right place for me (which I have been sucessful). I need my employer to be as professional as myself, and yes...it seems picky...but after 3 horrid nightmarish jobs where I did nothing but cry on my way, cry on my way back....I feel I must do this!

    My current job...I did it soooo right. I worked agency there for 6 months and knew it to be the perfect fit! I still did all the bells and whistles for the interview even thought it was considered just a formality/red tape...
  13. by   Mulan
    the nurse recruiter doesn't get back to you, you have to hound the recruiter to get offered an interview and then a position

    you are on time for your interview, the unit manager keeps you waiting

    the nurse recruiter sends in info with the info (ie address) incorrect (this is after you get hired) to HR

    I always dress neatly and conservatively but am not going to go out and buy an expensive suit for example for a bedside nurse position, after all I am going to be wearing a uniform.
  14. by   Pupnshnooter
    Quote from Mulan
    the nurse recruiter doesn't get back to you, you have to hound the recruiter to get offered an interview and then a position

    you are on time for your interview, the unit manager keeps you waiting

    the nurse recruiter sends in info with the info (ie address) incorrect (this is after you get hired) to HR

    I always dress neatly and conservatively but am not going to go out and buy an expensive suit for example for a bedside nurse position, after all I am going to be wearing a uniform.

    I may be taking this too personally, and if so I apologize in advance. It appears that although you have all had tough times with recruiters, trust me, I have interviewed with them too, but they are some of the people that hold your future in their hands and politeness is always appreciated.

    You have to "hound" a recruiter? - Is this why people continuously call me every hour on the hour and don't realize that I just may not be at my desk. Or, they don't give me a valid number to call them back at so I can return their call promptly?

    Wrong address? Maybe you were in a rush to fill out your application and mistakenly gave the wrong address?

    I don't expect a suit, geesh, I don't like them either, but a trip to goodwill or Wal*Mart and $30 later you look like you should get the money you deserve and you will have a nice outfit to wear when you don't need to be in scrubs.

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