Job Hunting - I don't understand - page 4

I am just curious and I don't want to sound evil, but recently I have had nurses come into my facility in jeans and t-shirts asking if we have any jobs available and then want to interview... Read More

  1. by   MedSurgeMess
    Quote from llg
    I find this to all too common with new grads -- and I am happy to hear you got the support you needed from your dad. So many new grads, particularly the younger ones, come into the workplace totally unprepared to deal with the interpersonal issues that come with working in the adult world. They have spent all of their lives surrounded primarily by people close to their own age in high school and college. Yes, some of their fellow nursing student are older, but they are still in the student role. As a result, these new grads have never had to deal with "adult" interpersonal relationships and other realities of launching and maintaining a successful career.

    There's even a book written about it, "Ready or Not, Here Life Comes," by Dr. Mel Levine. He's an expert in child development and learning disabilities. He noticed an increasing number of young people who are growing up in our society totally unprepared for adulthood -- particularly in the areas of launching a career and being successful in the workplace.

    I'm trying to use some of his ideas to help the students I work with, but only time will tell I am succeeding.

    llg
    Also, unfortunately, there has been this sense of entitlement that many (not all) of the younger generation have instilled in them, much of it comes from the media. They get out into the "real world" and find out that not all of their problems are earth shattering, and that they are not going to always be the center of attention, and not everyone is going to run to the rescue. Unfortunately, my oldest found this out the hard way, and now is having a hard time coping, and it was only fast-food!..BTW-I did make him dress in nice slacks and dress shirt for that job, and the manager told me later that most just wear old ratty jeans and a t-shirt
  2. by   Mulan
    Quote from 777RNThatsMe
    Well, all I can say is, I've worked in a variety of jobs from the age of 15 on..and I have dressed differently for every venue depending on a number of things (I'm talking about on the job and, for the interview). Not all employers care about open toed shoes in fact, some that are more 'hip' you will find many employees wearing such even in interviews. I have always been offered about 99 percent of whatever job I have applied for from professional office to retail to sales to nursing. Once I have been in an interview, I mean. So I guess I rather do "get it." Not every employer is stuffy. So long as you look clean, who cares if your shoes are open or not. What matters is you feel a sense of self when you go in there - that you are comfortable in your own skin when you are in there; that you feel you look nice. I would imagine that you would also (if you were smart) guaged the environment you are applying for and decided if you fit in before you applied and that goes for how they dress as well. If your employer doesn't like your choice of dress (given this consideration aforementioned) then perhaps it's not the employer for you; likewise if you don't care for the information that you hear in an interview (presuming you ask them), or what you find on the job, you leave/don't take the job. Just because someone wears what they feel are fashionable "open toed shoes" or whatever and don't dress "stuffy" doesn't mean they won't dress to conform to whatever written dress code there is nor that they will not do a good job/work hard. Like I said before, some folks need to just lighten up. We can be professional and clean, and up to date (i.e fashionable) and not in the dark ages all at the same time.

    Just my 2 cents. And considering my track record, well, I must be doin' something right - thank God!!
    I totally agree.

    Very well said!
  3. by   angel337
    Quote from MBA2BRN
    I am not a nurse and so I cannot speak to this subject from experience but it sounds like nurses are using the shortage as some kind of job entitlement. This is similar to the people who worked in the IT industry back in the 1990s.

    I worked in IT back in the 90s and I heard similar complaints from employers. The difference between that industry at that time and health care industry today is the fact that health admins refuse to feel or act in a desperate manner. Unlike IT managers who hired just about anyone to fill a position, most health care administrators will not fill a position with an unqualified individual or one who does not have the personality that will fit into a particular unit.

    However, students are going to school (as am I) and many think he/she will have leverage that he/she has never experienced before because there is a shortage. I try to explain to the few people I know that employers are not desperate, but the overall feeling is that I am wrong!

    I personally have done a lot of research and have monitored job openings in my area, and despite a number of people graduating nursing school, many positions remain open. In some cases positions will be removed rather then filled (I checked). Unfortunately my counter parts will probably find out the hard way; that health care employers are not desperate due to a shortage and will go without hiring them if given a negative impression.

    Maybe those of you with access to nursing students can find a way to share this message? Maybe some will walk out of school with open eyes rather then believing the ridiculous rumors that float around schools? Maybe if the message comes from veterans like yourselves, future nurses will listen?

    In any case, I won't be one of the unprofessional looking for a job as a Registered Nurse. I was not unprofessional when I worked in IT at a time I could have gotten away with it and I will not start now. :wink2:
    i totally agree with you. something to keep in mind also is that a QUALITY nursing job is hard to come by and i don't want to work for an institution that's too desperate, because the working conditions are probably horrible.
  4. by   one2one
    I was sitting in the human resources office one day when a woman wearing sweatpants, tank top and flipflops walked in and asked for an application. The receptionist was very respectful but very direct in telling her that the way she was dressed would never get her an interview and proceded to tell her that she should come back with a "business casual" attire, then she could help her. I was so impressed that the receptionist would take the time to explain this to her and how important it was. Sometimes someone just needs to teach people what they are doing wrong, in order to help them do it right in the future.
  5. by   NHNurseMan
    Quote from llg
    This type of unprofessional behavior has become more common in recent years and many people are upset about it. It seems as if some people assume that because there is a nursing shortage, they no longer have to "sell themselves" when job hunting. Unfortunately, some hospitals are tolerating such behavior, which encourages it.

    While I agree that there are sometimes legitimate reasons for an unprofessional appearance, it should not be acceptable unless there is indeed a special reason for it. We should not allow such things to become the norm for our profession.

    llg
    This is by no means a shot to all "younger" (>25) job seeker, but there does seem to be a sense of entitlement exhibited by some of this new generation.
    I keep slapping myself saying I can't believe I'm saying this; or god I'm getting old, but I think that there is an all around lack of respect given not only to the recruiters, but to the experienced floor personnel; these experienced people include aides, nurses, and to my horror MD's.
    Believe me I cowtow to noone, but I have and exhibit a level of respect for all those in those in the healthcare field, and I hope that these experiences of unprofessionalism are few and far between.
    Last edit by NHNurseMan on Sep 30, '06
  6. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Quote from one2one
    I was so impressed that the receptionist would take the time to explain this to her and how important it was. Sometimes someone just needs to teach people what they are doing wrong, in order to help them do it right in the future.
    That is awesome! Good for the receptionist for being honest with the applicant. If the applicant honestly didn't know better, at least she wouldn't have wasted her time on the application only to have it thrown in the trash. Hopefully the little education she recieved (however humilitating it may have been) will have been a valuable life lesson, helping her to actually get a job in the future.

    But of course, as appropriate as it may have been for the receptionist, theres always that fear that someone is going to freak out on you or accuse you being discriminatory or something like that.

    Sure, she may just have been the best nurse in the world, but hey, a little professionalism in the workplace (before you actually work there) sure wouldn't hurt. Why not sell an employer the whole package, rather than just the paper resume? Obviously, there may be exceptions to the rule (like the previous poster who said she picked up an application after spending a night in ICU), but if you know you're going to go application/job hunting and the option is to look like a professional in the workplace, or ready for a workout at the gym.....why would you choose the gymwear???:smackingf
  7. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from maryshome8
    I'm 37...not an oldie by any means, but I wouldn't be caught dead even showing up in person to even ask about a job wearing anything less than a suit....you never knew whem they might interview you.

    How someone dresses, shows how much they want the job and what kind of employee they will be.

    Would you believe when I was in high school, our business teachers (who were "old school"...thank God) taught us everything about how to conduct ourselves at work from carrying an extra pair of pantyhose, to taking off your nail polish altogether if you had a bad chip, to how to deal with a boss who is cheating on his wife!

    Nobody ever taught us that in college!

    Great post. My high school had a body-length mirror hung in the hallway with a sign posted over it that said "WOULD YOU HIRE THIS PERSON"? I don't know if they teach things like that anymore.
  8. by   91C_ARMYLPN
    Quote from Pupnshnooter
    I am just curious and I don't want to sound evil, but recently I have had nurses come into my facility in jeans and t-shirts asking if we have any jobs available and then want to interview immediately.

    I also receive calls from individuals looking for jobs who often speak to me in a rude manner as if I owed them something.

    Keep in mind I try to be as pleasant as possible - REALLY! But is this something that a nurse, or any professional is now doing? I understand that there may be a shortage, but professionalism still counts for something, doesn't it?

    Please help me to help you.

    Thanks.





    P.S. I have been recruiting for 9 years now, but mostly corporate, this is my first time in healthcare.



    Going to a job interview is serious business! You only have one chance to make an impression, and make it count. Remember, first time impressions are lasting. Dress professionally, do your research, bring your resume/references, etc. If you are a potential candidate who has a sloppy appearance, do you really think you are going to be hired? Be realistic! You represent that company/hospital/organization, etc.

    Leave the sweats, negative attitude, and other baggage at the door. It's too bad that part of the nursing curriculum does not have a class, "Interview 101" It would be so helpful...dress to impress, how to do a resume, mock interview techniques, what employers are looking for, professional demeanor, etc. Maybe it's because I have served 16.5 years in the Army, that this is all just 2nd nature. But, be it the military or civilian sector.. always be prepared. Just IMHO.
  9. by   edowhitetop

    Unfortunately, unprofessional dress is the norm in a number of healthcare facilities I am acquainted with. I recently worked at an outpatient mental health facility and found that visitors always came to me for information because I was the only one they could see who fit their expectations of how staff should be dressed!
  10. by   countrychic76
    Professionalism is hard to find. I have been searching for a job and been through a couple job interviews, I have been at my current job for 10 years. It has been years since I went through the interview process. I had appointment set up with a DON who started job 6 weeks prior. When I called back to make sure appointment was still set up, woman answered the phone she told me the woman left. I asked her if any positions open she told me there would be some opening up since they were firing people. That really makes me want to work for that company. Couple days later I went to another facility for an open house. They were discussing all the things that happened to the prior mentioned facility, all this while people are filling out applications and having interviews. Talk about professionalism, in a openhouse you are supposed to advocating your facility and why people would want to work there, not bring drama.
  11. by   CHATSDALE
    some people come to interviews with dirty fingernails, when they know which shift the interview is for they state that they can not work 3/ll and that some day nurse could be asked to trade with them
    when i was in school for the office practice we did have dress up days when you were expected to wear clothes you would come to work in and they also had mock interviews for those nearing graduation
    as for saying that people are in the 'dark ages' because they have expections for those presenting for interviews, perhaps that could have been phrased a little nicer
  12. by   tizmonster
    Quote from Pupnshnooter
    I am just curious and I don't want to sound evil, but recently I have had nurses come into my facility in jeans and t-shirts asking if we have any jobs available and then want to interview immediately.

    I also receive calls from individuals looking for jobs who often speak to me in a rude manner as if I owed them something.

    Keep in mind I try to be as pleasant as possible - REALLY! But is this something that a nurse, or any professional is now doing? I understand that there may be a shortage, but professionalism still counts for something, doesn't it?

    Please help me to help you.

    Thanks.

    P.S. I have been recruiting for 9 years now, but mostly corporate, this is my first time in healthcare.
    Hi, I too have been recruiting for 10 years, and 7 of in healthcare (nursing). I suspect that maybe people don't realise that we act as an extention of the companies we represent. I'm a CPC and have to function with the same labor laws as any employer. The thing that is totally misunderstood is we usually work directly with administrators and business managers, HR is a factor in what I do usually after the process is coming to a positive conclusion. We have relationships developed that we sometimes receive request from hiring managers that aren't posted and are very confidential in nature. It's a very fun process to help candidates define their goals and then help introduce them to those things that are important to their careers and their families. Recruiters should be focusing on what's in the hearts of the candidates, and then act on that information gathering. As far as the dress...I am assuming they just aren't aware of how strong our business relationships are with our clients. It would make a difference to me as to what type of organization I would refer an individual. I would not necessarily refer a casual candidate to a academic environment (university based hospital) - Also, part of your preparation of the candidate is how to "dress for success." Some companies would be fine with casual...but not many in my experience. That's more apparent in information technology and software development. I've actually had clients tell me not to send someone in a suit - when I was working in Information technology recruiting. Hope that helps.
  13. by   marylyric
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Maybe it's because of the way I was brought up, but I always wore my best clothing even when doing nothing but INQUIRING about jobs. It never hurts to be prepared to interview, and that's happened more than once when I've gone into a business to pick up an application........not only got interviewed, but hired on the spot!

    By contrast---and I'm sorry, but I have to confess this---when someone walks into MY building to ask for an application looking as though they just crawled out of bed, their app sort of gets "lost" in transit from my desk to my boss's.

    I'm not talking about applicants who get their clothes from Goodwill instead of Macy's. I don't care about that---heck, I buy some of MY stuff there as well! I mean those who wear pajama bottoms and T-shirts, don't bother to comb their hair, and walk in barefooted........or worse, bring their children in with them! That tells me they a) don't care how they look, b) probably won't care how the RESIDENTS look, and c) have child care problems that may interfere with their work. There are too many people out there who really WANT to work, for me to go to the trouble of hiring and training people who are too lazy even to make a good first impression.
    I am pretty sure, if they knew how stuffy you are, about someone picking up an application in street clothes, that would be very happy the application got lost in transit, no one wants to work for anual people

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