Job Hunting - I don't understand - page 2

I am just curious and I don't want to sound evil, but recently I have had nurses come into my facility in jeans and t-shirts asking if we have any jobs available and then want to interview... Read More

  1. by   Mulan
    No, not every hour, how about after 3 or more weeks?

    No, I did not give the wrong address, I take offense to you suggesting that I did.

    I don't wear scrubs.

    HR even asked who the recruiter was and said she was slow.

    I have been in this profession for over 30 years, I know how to be polite, how to interview, what to wear, and have been hired for every position I interviewed for.

    One thing I have noticed is that today there is a lot of incompetence out there in the business world.
  2. by   Pupnshnooter
    Please don't take offense. I did not mean to insult you, however you would be incredibly surprised at what I see on resumes and applications. It would make your mind spin.

    I think in ALL industries have a lot of incompetance and it is sad. If your treatment was so horrible, and it sounds like it was, I would recommend you send a letter to the head of Human Resources describing what you had to go through as this is unacceptable.

    Again, I do make it a point to be professional from my side, return calls the day I receive them (I swear I do) and even remember names of people who I have been playing phone tag with so they know that they are just as important to me as I should be to them.

    All I ask is for the same respect.

    I could guarantee if you ever called me at my office - you would be pleasantly surprised.
  3. by   Quickbeam
    I did hire/fire as a nurse manager for years. In this NOT warm climate, I had people come in in cut offs, tube tops, curlers, drunk, high...demanding to know where their office and secretary would be! (These were office RN jobs but we use cubes. )

    I've posted this elsewhere on a similar thread but I started showing candidates the office space first to indicate it wasn't all corner offices and hot and cold running clerical help. Sometimes nurses have mighty funny ideas about what is involved in an office job.

    The lack of respect in dress would amaze me at first. I saw so much of it that it stopped being surprising but never became acceptable.
    Last edit by Quickbeam on Oct 4, '06
  4. by   Kim O'Therapy
    I think professionalism and the proper mannerisms that accompany it have gone by the wayside. I am currently a nursing student and worry about which, if any, of my classmates I will be "stuck" working with. My opinion is this: If you can't make it to class on time, will you be late relieving me from my 12 hour shift?

    Maybe its the "generation gap". Who knows? I find that most people want everything on a silver platter, arrive late for lecture continuously, and complain about any type of inconvenience thrown their way. For example, when we were given our clinical assignments, students were literally crying because they were not assigned to a location close to their residence; therefore, they would have to get up a half-hour earlier. Geez people!

    Oh well, if it makes anyone feel better, my father is a retired policeman. He always told me stories about applicants with track marks on their arms, applicants with cut-offs and sandals, and best of all - applicants with criminal records! LOL So, it does happen everywhere, not just within the medical field.
  5. by   llg
    What is just as sad (or worse) is that some people continue to dress inappropriately after they are hired. I work in staff develop and teach some of the orientation classes. We all can't believe what some people choose to wear on their first few days in a new job.

    They behave just as badly -- talking on phones, text messaging, arguing, talking to their "neighbors," etc. No, our classes aren't that bad: we are repeatedly told what a great orientation program we have. It's just that some people have never learned basic common courtesy. College professors are complaining about it, too ... and we have all heard stories from high school teachers that make us shudder. People are growing up in the US without learning to behave themselves and show a little respect now and then.

    It's sad.

    llg
  6. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from llg
    What is just as sad (or worse) is that some people continue to dress inappropriately after they are hired. I work in staff develop and teach some of the orientation classes. We all can't believe what some people choose to wear on their first few days in a new job.

    They behave just as badly -- talking on phones, text messaging, arguing, talking to their "neighbors," etc. No, our classes aren't that bad: we are repeatedly told what a great orientation program we have. It's just that some people have never learned basic common courtesy. College professors are complaining about it, too ... and we have all heard stories from high school teachers that make us shudder. People are growing up in the US without learning to behave themselves and show a little respect now and then.

    It's sad.




    llg
    :yeahthat:
  7. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    I recently attended a healthcare job fair, and was incredibly suprised by what I saw. The number of people who showed up in jeans, sweatpants, tanktops, flipflops, hand decorated jackets, you name it.... Body Odour, heavy perfume, HEAVY makeup, excessive jewelery.....

    I can't count how many times I've been taught what to do and not to do for job interviews, fairs, even when just going in to pick up an application. The # of times that appropriate professional dress (and what exactly that entails) has come up in my program has made me crazy. "As university students, shouldn't we know how to dress professionally for the workplace/clinicals" but after seeing how some people still present themselves, justifies every minute our profs spent clarifying professional dress.

    While most of the people I saw at the job fair were dressed appropriately, the number who weren't just blew my mind. I think the idea of not having to sell yourself b/c of the nursing shortage has gotten into too many people's heads. Sure hospitals need nurses, but mabe they don't need you in particular.
  8. by   777RNThatsMe
    What is interesting to me is that you see "hollywood stars" going in "dress up" jeans, etc. So - what's the problem if you feel that is fashionable? You can look very nice in them depending. Not to say i wore them for interviews, I didn't. But, if I could manage to look spiffy enough - why not. Sometimes "fashion" to me looks anything but. I think it all depends on the venue in which you interview and who interviews you.

    As for employers, yep. They aren't all highly formal either and some are downright disorganized. I have recently experienced such a thing. As with employees, employers will vary greatly. But what really matters is (insofar as nurses) where the rubber meets the road. Initial dress is NOT an indicator, in my opinion, of how well a person will do their job. And also, when referencing childcare - though I think there is no place for them during an interview, I myself DID pick up some apps with my kids in tow because I had just graduated and had no MONEY for childcare until I started a job. And ...I managed to swing it for the interview as I scheduled it while they were in school (by that time, school had started). So I think it's pretty inappropriate to judge someone just b/c they have kids in tow while picking up an application especially since that is not the formal interview. Loosen up folks!
  9. by   rach_nc_03
    as for the kids in tow- when i worked in staff development, I had people who wanted an on-the-spot interview when they picked up the application- and they'd ask the receptionist to call me REPEATEDLY while they waited in the lobby- the kids were in the car, and they had to hurry. No thanks. Schedule an interview for a time when you have childcare arrangements. To pick up an application, it depends on the location whether or not you should bring your kids in.

    I'm now working at a nonprofit that offers health insurance to it's members; the office is in DC, and pretty formal for someone from the south- especially after working in scrubs for a few years! But I took that job mostly because of the respect they showed me as an applicant, and the way they treat their employees. Good example of this- I was recruited for this job; I'd posted my resume online, but didn't intend to actively interview until this winter after I have surgery next month. (I posted the resume early because i wanted to be considered for jobs with the federal government, where it takes up to 9 months to complete the hiring process.) I had a great interview, loved the supervisor, the environment- and I had a call when I got home that day with a verbal offer. It was FAR beyond the salary requirements I'd stated ($12K more, in fact). I told the HR person that I was going to have major surgery soon, so they needed to know that up-front if they wanted me for the job; if they decided to withdraw the offer, I would completely understand, but if they hired me, I would be taking 6 weeks off within a few months of my hire.

    I expected them to retract the offer, but they were totallly fine with it- I had short-term disability insurance from day one, too. They've been fantastic through the whole process, in fact. This company's philosophy is to treat each and every employee with the same respect they would the CEO or an external customer, and it shows- the employees all treat one another with a great deal of respect.

    My point is that, after a few nursing jobs with HORRID unprofessionalism (I was fired for having back surgery in one), having a positive, respectful work environment was a top priority for me. I commute about 3 hours a day for this job, but it's worth it. I have to wonder how much more respect most nurses would have for their employers- and each other- if their employers followed the golden rule, y'know?
  10. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from 777RNThatsMe
    What is interesting to me is that you see "hollywood stars" going in "dress up" jeans, etc. So - what's the problem if you feel that is fashionable? You can look very nice in them depending. Not to say i wore them for interviews, I didn't. But, if I could manage to look spiffy enough - why not. Sometimes "fashion" to me looks anything but. I think it all depends on the venue in which you interview and who interviews you.

    As for employers, yep. They aren't all highly formal either and some are downright disorganized. I have recently experienced such a thing. As with employees, employers will vary greatly. But what really matters is (insofar as nurses) where the rubber meets the road. Initial dress is NOT an indicator, in my opinion, of how well a person will do their job. And also, when referencing childcare - though I think there is no place for them during an interview, I myself DID pick up some apps with my kids in tow because I had just graduated and had no MONEY for childcare until I started a job. And ...I managed to swing it for the interview as I scheduled it while they were in school (by that time, school had started). So I think it's pretty inappropriate to judge someone just b/c they have kids in tow while picking up an application especially since that is not the formal interview. Loosen up folks!
    I can see now that some just don't get it.

    It is not to the prospective employer to "loosen" up...the onus is on the prospective employee to "tighten up" their behavior/attire.

    Nurses are not "Hollywood Stars" nor should we try to be like them. Quite frankly, given the poor work attitudes, street language, and pathetic morals, why anyone would seek to dress like them, believing that they are professional, escapes me.

    I look at the way that many "stars" dress is laughable and pathetic, and not something to copy.

    Job interviews (barring "The Devil Wears Prada") is not about being "fashionable", it is about being hirable. This are frequently two very different things.

    That said, attire does not mean that you are a good or a bad nurse. But it may indicate whether you seek to fit in with certain standards. If you are hiring for a workplace, with a certain dress code, chances are some who at least appears to obey the standards of proper dress/behavior for an interview, has demonstrated that they are more likely to conform to proper behavior/dress for work.

    A job interview is not a time for your average behavior, it is a time for your best behavior.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    And some people use the, "Well, the interviewer was messy/slow/busy" excuse. Well the interviewer is already working there and has the rights, you are NOT working there.

    They are doing YOU the favor, not you doing them one.

    Now you can believe that you are doing them the favor by deigning to interview with them, but you will find quickly that attitude burns bridges.

    You can hold all the opinions that you want about how "dress shouldn't matter" that you want - it does not change the fact that how you present yourself is the first impression that the interviewer gets. And most people form their opinion as to whether you are hired within 5-10 minutes of meeting you.

    Yes, the person interviewing you should be neat/tidy/organized/polite/etc. However, they already have the job, you don't. You do not like the way an interviewer portrays the company or themselves, fine. Don't take the job. If they were truly offensive, complain. But don't be surprised if that lands your job prospects in the circular file.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As a further note as a general rule:

    People that I have seen come to interviews dressed properly, ARE generally the better workers. Those that cannot be bothered to change out of their jeans and at least put on dress pants, frequently are a bit slovenly in other work habits.

    Don't shoot the messenger, I just call it as I see it after 27 years of working.
  11. by   Pupnshnooter
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I can see now that some just don't get it.

    It is not to the prospective employer to "loosen" up...the onus is on the prospective employee to "tighten up" their behavior/attire.

    Nurses are not "Hollywood Stars" nor should we try to be like them. Quite frankly, given the poor work attitudes, street language, and pathetic morals, why anyone would seek to dress like them, believing that they are professional, escapes me.

    I look at the way that many "stars" dress is laughable and pathetic, and not something to copy.

    Job interviews (barring "The Devil Wears Prada") is not about being "fashionable", it is about being hirable. This are frequently two very different things.

    That said, attire does not mean that you are a good or a bad nurse. But it may indicate whether you seek to fit in with certain standards. If you are hiring for a workplace, with a certain dress code, chances are some who at least appears to obey the standards of proper dress/behavior for an interview, has demonstrated that they are more likely to conform to proper behavior/dress for work.

    A job interview is not a time for your average behavior, it is a time for your best behavior.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    And some people use the, "Well, the interviewer was messy/slow/busy" excuse. Well the interviewer is already working there and has the rights, you are NOT working there.

    They are doing YOU the favor, not you doing them one.

    Now you can believe that you are doing them the favor by deigning to interview with them, but you will find quickly that attitude burns bridges.

    You can hold all the opinions that you want about how "dress shouldn't matter" that you want - it does not change the fact that how you present yourself is the first impression that the interviewer gets. And most people form their opinion as to whether you are hired within 5-10 minutes of meeting you.

    Yes, the person interviewing you should be neat/tidy/organized/polite/etc. However, they already have the job, you don't. You do not like the way an interviewer portrays the company or themselves, fine. Don't take the job. If they were truly offensive, complain. But don't be surprised if that lands your job prospects in the circular file.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As a further note as a general rule:

    People that I have seen come to interviews dressed properly, ARE generally the better workers. Those that cannot be bothered to change out of their jeans and at least put on dress pants, frequently are a bit slovenly in other work habits.

    Don't shoot the messenger, I just call it as I see it after 27 years of working.
    :yeahthat:

    I could not have said it better myself. Thank you to the many who support me. I am glad to know that I am not crazy and that I should continue to consider those who have consideration for themselves.

  12. by   nuangel1
    i guess i am old fashioned .i was taught to look professional when going in for application,interview etc.minimal makeup low heeled shoes suit or dress with minimal jewelry ,no open toed shoes etc .i almost always wear a suit or blouse and shirt .i believe in speaking in business manner polite etc send thankyou note after .i have not been offered and or accepted all job offers but i feel i have presented myself in a professional manner .i have done many interviews in 20 yrs .i have also experienced many issues r/t recruitment they send a post card they received your resume but then don't get back to me in any way ,don't return messages .i even had one place that kept requesting a resume for reveiw because they kept losing it i sent them 5 .last few jobs i went thru a recruitment company this company sends the resume sets up interview answers questions for both job and me and i usually get a interview very quickly as oppesed to when i sent them in it takes weeks to here form recruiter.
  13. by   llg
    Quote from S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Sure hospitals need nurses, but mabe they don't need you in particular.
    lmao ... Oh, I love that line! I'll probably quote it in some future post someday. So, I am apologize in advance if I don't give you the proper credit when I do.

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