Job Hopper??

  1. I did a serch on the thread for this topic, but did not really find much, which suprises me. I am an RN, BSN, graduated at 43 in May 2005. I was offered what seem to be a great job ( all I can say is BEWARE of signing bonuses, usually a good reason they are offerred) and worked 6 months to the day. This was a telemetry floor and I stayed as long as I did to get my "floor" skills down, became more concerned about my license and left for a job in case management with our local health department. Good job, 8-5, great benefits but the program (the way I do my job, documentation, forms, procedures, you name it) changes every few months because it is funded by a grant and as the State of Texas changes its mind about how the money should be spent then we have to change. Now a friend contacted me about a job as a supervisor in the county jail for $1400 per month more that would use my supervisor skills and my nursing skills. I really do not want to be seen as a "job hopper" but what if I wait 1 or 2 more years and the job nerver comes open again? Plus no telling how my job will have morphed by then, or heaven forbid go unfunded. Any opinions will be greatly appreciated. I have learned a lot reading this forum and want to do the right thing.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    all I can say is BEWARE of signing bonuses, usually a good reason they are offerred
    Always thought this myself, which is why any place i've read about that offers a sign on bonus, i quickly ask myself "wonder why?"

    When you fill out applications, make sure you fill out the "reason for leaving" blanks inder the previous employers section. Do it in a factual mature way, make sure the reason doesn't sound vindictive.
  4. by   santhony44
    Quote from Marie_LPN

    When you fill out applications, make sure you fill out the "reason for leaving" blanks inder the previous employers section. Do it in a factual mature way, make sure the reason doesn't sound vindictive.
    This is good advice. Present your reasons for changing jobs in as positive a light as possible. You had the opportunity to gain new skills, try something you'd always wanted to do, etc etc. There is nothing wrong with applying for the supervisor job and saying just what you said here, that it will give you the opportunity to use both your supervisory skills and your nursing skills, maybe say that you want to return to a job that is more "hands-on" than case management allows, etc etc. It also doesn't hurt to point out how your previous job experience will benefit your prospective employer.

    I'd leave out things like the pay, having to change the way you do things frequently, not feeling your license was safe in the first job, etc. Don't lie but you don't have to give them your blunt unvarnished opinion, either. I've left jobs thinking I wouldn't go back until Hell freezes over, but I haven't told that to other employers!

    I'd go for it. Good luck!
  5. by   DDRN4me
    when i find that a job is not a good fit, i do look for something that seems to utilize more of my skills. in today's job market , especially in nursing, it is rare that people stay in the same position for many years. this sounds llike a good career opportunity, and , as you said, an opportunity to utilize your skills and past experience, so i would put exactly that. good luck, let us know! mary
  6. by   traumaRUs
    I don't think this is a problem because as a new grad - it is highly possible that you might not find the perfect job right off.
  7. by   SaderNurse05
    Thanks for the replies so far! I turned in my application today so I will let you all know where it goes from here.
  8. by   blingbling
    good luck.................

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