It seems like everyone but nurses make more money - page 9

I didn't become a nurse because I had a calling or anything. I was one of those few idiots in high school who had no dreams or aspiration, so my dad said "hey nursing sounds good" and I said... Read More

  1. by   joyjan
    the Mindset does depend on your values. Nursing may not pose financial dominance but career stability yes.. you earn the increase with experience and the fact that the knowledge you carry is ahead than most people that don't know about health should make you feel ahead. it about caring and intelligence. Specialization is also a step up. This field has so much to offer, it just takes time.
  2. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from rearviewmirror
    Well I was actually joking sarcastically when I said I got a key chain... which would have been worse actually if I got a key chain.
    What I am seeing is not the "educational elites" who put in hard work and making multi-figures. I am talking about regular Joe Blow with regualr 4 year old Bachelor degree. I know that no one gives you free money, that's why it's called work, but it's pretty disproportionate it seems, healthcare always poses difficulty and aneurysm-inducing type of jobs, while other fields are not as intense but just reek in easy money it seems.

    I am not too crazy about money, but having the examples around me makes me think that we deserve more, and yeah it's little childish but makes me think it's not fair.
    Here in California some of the highest paid workers are those in the skilled trades and so-called "Dirty Jobs." Heck the trash collector starts at $55,000.00 and just goes up from there. It's my opinion that college is not all that and many people can earn comfortable incomes in the skilled trades. As older workers are retiring and even passing on this demographic is struggling to attract new workers. My dad built a great life off being a carpenter and even sent all his kids (5) to college - none of us have done as well as he did - but he was also very frugal.

    hppy
  3. by   clandestine2
    One major advantage to working in healthcare, especially the areas of healthcare that require higher levels of education is demand. I have worked in administration in other industries where six figure salaries were the norm, however I must stress the volatility of “other” industries and demand. In my experience the value of a moderate income over extended time has more inherent value and security versus very high paying jobs and shorter more volatile time periods, not to mention the emotional stress that accompanies those industries. Also, nursing is one of the only professions I know of that one can double income (or at least increase 50%) with each level of education, i.e LPN to BSN to MSN. Nursing is in a very significant period now, and looking back we will recognize the pioneering strives made as it relates to salary equity and practice scope. If you want to make more money, and that is totally acceptable as a motivation, further you nursing education and expand your scope and the increased responsibilities will reflect in your pay.
  4. by   Allgood2016
    I have been an LVN/LPN for over 40 years.
    My first job was in 1977. I was making "new grad" pay. Not much by today's standards. Every one I went to high school with; and friends; thought I was making a lot of money; because I went into nursing. Here it is 2017 ; and, I'm making approximately $12.00 an hour more than I did then.
    Recently during a job interview I was asked "Why did you go into nursing? " Needless to say I was blindsided by this unusual question. My answer was "Because I care about people".

    Many people have misconceptions about nursing pay. I tell them I'm not in it for the
    pay/money. I've had other nurses ask me why I didn't go on for RN; and, that I would make more money. It's not about the money, to me. I'm happy where I'm at. If I wanted to make $$$$ I could have chosen many other professions. I became a NURSE because ...
    I CARE.
  5. by   mslove717
    I love nursing. I also make 40K a year as an RN, 4 years experience. I spent 7 years in school, including pre-req time (I have 2 degrees, 1 NOT in nursing). This area is underpaid in general. We also have a higher cost of living than national average, so I struggle. I actually have a 2nd job as well. I even qualify for some medicaid right now (I'm sole income family of 3 and I'm pregnant). Makes me feel real great, let me tell ya! I work for the state though so I will get a nice pension, this is a huge reason I stay at this job, but I would not be making much more with a private employer, under 50K plus awful insurance plans at the hospitals. Like I said this area (western NY) is underpaid, before I was a nurse I worked for a mortgage company making $12/hour with a 4 year degree so this nursing pay IS better than that pittance.

    Yes I get frustrated with how little I make and how much skill and education I must have, and the responsibility nurses bear in their jobs. I have friends who make a LOT more than me, with similar education and time invested in their jobs. Most of them are in some sort of sales or something similar. Ie they bring money in for a company. They have jobs where there are commissions, bonuses, projects rewarded with pay, etc.

    I think service industry jobs in general are just underpaid - teachers, social work, etc. It sucks, it's the line of work i chose and the one I do well at. We don't make the companies any money, we just "do." Business is about money, so we're not valued monetarily. I don't know what the answer is but I do educate people that no, at least in this area, nurses don't make much. But I truly love my job and I'm not miserable going to work. That is so important to me. I wish I made even 10 grand more, but I don't.
    Last edit by mslove717 on Jan 9
  6. by   LadyFree28
    Interesting topic.

    For the past two years, I have made 80k-granted, I had years of wage suppression and setbacks in my 11 year career, but not counting being a LPN, for a 4-year RN salary from ONE job is not too shabby-the previous year I was able to go abroad and enjoy the European life and come home to no bills.
    Money can go as long as the person is budgeting.

    It also depends on where someone works-in our union contract, nurses do not have a cap on wages like they did in the past. Many nurses are getting substantial income increases for the first time since working at my facility.
  7. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from kardz30
    Honestly any profession that requires a license and is regulated probably has a lot of potential to make money.

    Doctors and surgeons don't do it by being hospitalists. They do it by contracting and private practice.
    Lawyers don't do it by being prosecutors, they do it by being in private practice.
    Nurses do it by travel nursing, staffing businesses, or advanced practice (nurse prac / CRNA) and contracting/private practice.

    You have to be willing to do what it takes within a profession to make money. Usually that requires risk or self sufficiency. Working for someone else is equivalent to making someone elses dreams come true monetarily. Don't forget healthcare is a business whether its private or public. They have to break even or in the green. Handing RN's $100 an hour is not congruent with being profitable. Being in business for yourself is always a better option if money is your dream.

    I agree.

    You can be in business for yourself as a nurse; through traveling, being an independent contractor and setting it up as a sole proprietor and negotiating your salary along with the tax benefits worked very well for many years for me.

    My caveat is that it is hard work, you have to make sure you pay your taxes, and be able to maintain insurance to prevent risk liability.

    Although I always treat this profession as a business, I don't do Independent Contracting full time anymore; I don't mind having the corporate side of healthcare manage my taxes, while I keep working and I can help contribute those advances in my union contract, I will continue to live comfortably, while making career moves that allow me to be compensated for such. So far, it has paid off hanssomely, hence my previous post for my past years income.
  8. by   LaneyB
    I make ok money as a nurse. Not rich by any means, but enough to live comfortably.

    My daughter has always been extremely driven in school, and knew she wanted to be an engineer. She is halfway through a major in computer engineering, with a minor in Chinese. She will make major money when she is finished, and the job market is good. But boy has she worked hard. I don't know if I would have been willing at her age to push myself to that extent. The difficulty level of her classes astounds me. She will probably easily double my salary, but she earned it.
  9. by   SaraMay
    Not sure where you live, but nurses do quite well here in the Northwest. Coming from a business owner family, I assure you, in this neck of the woods...risks vs reward....is easier in the nursing world.
  10. by   CrunchRN
    Quote from mslove717
    I love nursing. I also make 40K a year as an RN, 4 years experience. I spent 7 years in school, including pre-req time (I have 2 degrees, 1 NOT in nursing). This area is underpaid in general. We also have a higher cost of living than national average, so I struggle. I actually have a 2nd job as well. I even qualify for some medicaid right now (I'm sole income family of 3 and I'm pregnant). Makes me feel real great, let me tell ya! I work for the state though so I will get a nice pension, this is a huge reason I stay at this job, but I would not be making much more with a private employer, under 50K plus awful insurance plans at the hospitals. Like I said this area (western NY) is underpaid, before I was a nurse I worked for a mortgage company making $12/hour with a 4 year degree so this nursing pay IS better than that pittance.

    Yes I get frustrated with how little I make and how much skill and education I must have, and the responsibility nurses bear in their jobs. I have friends who make a LOT more than me, with similar education and time invested in their jobs. Most of them are in some sort of sales or something similar. Ie they bring money in for a company. They have jobs where there are commissions, bonuses, projects rewarded with pay, etc.

    I think service industry jobs in general are just underpaid - teachers, social work, etc. It sucks, it's the line of work i chose and the one I do well at. We don't make the companies any money, we just "do." Business is about money, so we're not valued monetarily. I don't know what the answer is but I do educate people that no, at least in this area, nurses don't make much. But I truly love my job and I'm not miserable going to work. That is so important to me. I wish I made even 10 grand more, but I don't.



    That is nuts! The employers are getting away with murder. Is it due to a glut of nurses. Why are young people even going into nursing there?
  11. by   Rntr
    This is nursing. To make more money leave the nursing field. I wished I had years ago. Poor pay, treatment and the public is miserable to work with.

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