Is Your Name Important? - page 5

For starters, I will reveal that I am an African-American female with a very common anglicized first and last name. I am also friendly with a small handful of nurse managers, staff development... Read More

  1. Visit  Born_2BRN profile page
    0
    Great article! It's very informative! I never thought of it that way but I do look at it the same way. You can tell lots about a person by their name. For instance, if their last name is foreign and first American meaning they were born in the states. Either that this person married to someone who is foreigner. My name altogether is unique and difficult to pronoun. I would not doubt it if a minute they see they toss it away in a not hiring pile.
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  3. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    1
    One of the Freakonomics books did a chapter on names. They really can affect you in later life. Names that scream "ghetto" or are too cutesy really can hurt your chances in later life. All my years in L&D, I don't think I ever tried to dissuade someone from a name, I would just cringe inwardly. But I think parents really should give it some thought. Yes, MaK'enZ'eeee, Corvoisier, L-A (ladasha) are all great and uneek and all, but when their resumes are laying in a pile with Elizabeth's and Katherine's resumes, who is more likely to get the interview? According to research, Elizabeth and Katherine are more likely to get the call. Freakanomics and More Freakanomics are fascinating reads, and did influence my child's name. I was never one that approved of trendy or unique names, or names that seemed to originate from someone flinging scrabble tiles against the wall and choosing the first 8 that landed face up, but the research confirmed my feelings. My child was born in 2009, but just by looking at his name, you couldn't tell if it was 2009, 1909, 1809, or 1709. It's not in the top 10, but it's not all that uncommon either.
    Spidey's mom likes this.
  4. Visit  RNperdiem profile page
    0
    I had to laugh when I read about names being generational. It is true!
    Whenever I go to my husband's office party, I am introduced to a long list of one-syllable guy names from a generation slightly older than my own.
    There was Don, Dan, Ed, Tom, Bill, Lou, John, Jim, Mark, Dave, Scott, Greg, and their wives all seemed to be named Pam or Sue.
    The exception was the foreign born co-workers whose names were complex.
  5. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
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    Quote from tanjazovko
    HI. I am from Croatia, I am Tanja and we dont have such problems... We have some another problems... Politicals, and economys.My name is from Russia, and I have never been there, but it is very big problem, our parents give us names and name dont say that we are clever or not, good or bad...
    Whoa! Your name is VERY much like mine. Creepy, lol.
  6. Visit  ChicagoMay profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Having an idea of the candidate's racial-ethnic background might help or hurt, depending on the circumstances. For example, rsums with white-sounding names have a 50% greater chance of receiving a callback when compared to those with African American names, according to a study performed for the National Bureau of Economic Research by the University of Chicago's Marianne Bertrand and Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sendhil Mullaina (Dickler, 2009). However, the recruiter or HR director who is purposely seeking a diverse group of candidates might call the applicants with ethnic-sounding names.
    Well this sucks for me... I'm whiter than white (I don't tan, I burn type white) but my first name is an African-American name... Thanks mom and dad, lol.
  7. Visit  rnmama999 profile page
    0
    I have a Russian first name with a German last name (my husband's) and I am Chinese/Filipina lol. I'm pretty sure I've confused people but I don't think it's had a negative impact on me. I also know who's educated and/or paid attention in history class if they are able to pronounce my first name (totally joking lol)
  8. Visit  ddunnrn profile page
    0
    This is my 2nd post on this topic, because I am fascinated by it. I have always been a fan of futuristic science fiction (Yes, I'm a big Trekkie!) and sometimes when I drift off into a daydream, I imagine how people's names will change in the future, when human interbreeding will be common, and attitudes toward different cultures will be less egocentric. I imagine lots of cafe au lait people with a variety of types of hair and facial morphologies, but with interest names like Mei Li Gonzales or Vittorio Abadejo. I remember years ago I got a foretaste of this when I had a professor in grad school named Jos Rabinowicz, who happened to be a Mexican Jew, and an excellent human being.
  9. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
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    My daughter has a unique first name, but not anything too far out there. Still, I gave her a very plain middle name so if she were to decide she didn't like being "unique" she could go by her middle name. I really don't see that happening though.

    I make assumptions when I see the name "Blaze," which is really not fair since nobody picks their own name, but name bias is definitely out there!
  10. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    1
    Quote from Good Morning, Gil
    Okay, on the name note: I need objective advice, which I know friends and family won't give me since they just want to be supportive of a name I picked.

    Is it okay to name your child what would normally be a nick-name? I'm not pregnant yet, but I do have my heart set on a particular name since it's a name in the family, and I could always be sentimental and remember this person after she's long gone , but I don't like her full name, so I wanted to name my future daughter the nick-name version of it. I really really like it...but would she not be taken seriously? One of my friends has a nick name as her formal name, and it works well.

    Great thread by the way.
    While you have every right to name your child whatever you choose, I'd encourage you NOT to name your child a nickname. As the former owner of such a name, I found myself changing it to the longer version at my first opportunity. My former first name, while cute on a little girl, was TOO cute for a grown woman and would have been ridiculous on a little old lady. And it was often mistaken for a stripper name combined with my first husband's last name!
    esperanzita likes this.
  11. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    2
    A friend of mine who is a police detective tells me that folks with the truly "unique" first names (L-A, TreShaun, TiQuanda) or unique spellings of traditional names are inordinately represented in jail. At first, I blamed bias. And then I was told that "parents who name their kids William or Elizabeth rather than ChlorSandra or LaShaun are more likely to read to their kids, take them to church, get involved in their education and raise them to be responsible, law abiding adults." Perhaps that's bias, but I've run that theory past several other friends who are teachers, and it seems to hold water.
    BrandonLPN and Spidey's mom like this.
  12. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    A friend of mine who is a police detective tells me that folks with the truly "unique" first names (L-A, TreShaun, TiQuanda) or unique spellings of traditional names are inordinately represented in jail. At first, I blamed bias. And then I was told that "parents who name their kids William or Elizabeth rather than ChlorSandra or LaShaun are more likely to read to their kids, take them to church, get involved in their education and raise them to be responsible, law abiding adults." Perhaps that's bias, but I've run that theory past several other friends who are teachers, and it seems to hold water.
    The unique 'black-sounding' names became wildly popular after the miniseries 'Roots' came on the airwaves in 1977. Many black parents started naming their babies unique names after having watched this movie. Apparently the popularity has not wavered 30+ years later, because people are still naming their kids these types of names.

    I am a black female who was born in '81 when other girls and boys in my cohort were receiving these unique 'black-sounding' names. My parents wanted me to have a more plain name that did not give clues about my race, so I ended up with a common anglicized two-syllable name.
  13. Visit  yshell12 profile page
    0
    The responses on this thread make me sick. I'm AA w/ kids that have neutral names but folks who complain about the uniqueness of a name are those who believe in conformity. We were made to be individuals! Ridiculous!
  14. Visit  tainted1972 profile page
    0
    Thank you for posting this discussion. A couple of days ago I actually began a similar post, but I felt like I may be overreacting. According to your post, I am not.
    I am a white american female with a very unique first name, it is hard to prounounce/spell and may even look foreign. I have always wondered if my name ever interfered with or was the reason for me getting a job interview. I am currently in the process of finding my first RN job ( I have been an LPN for almost 3 years). I have had ZERO phone calls! I have been tempted to reapply to all of the same facilities using my middle name instead. It is a common female name, easy to pronounce... etc.
    Would it be wrong to omit my first name and use my middle name instead? I am really curious to know if this makes a difference.

    I am going to really be upset if I find out the reason I hardly ever get called for an interview is because of my name. I have never been turned down for a job once I have been interviewed so I know I am a desirable employee.


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