Is this the publics perception of nurses? - page 15

i am a charge RN in a cvicu. yesterday i took care of a man that was pod1 5 vessel cabg on a balloon pump and multiple drips. i had post op'd the pt the previous day so i had developed a repor with... Read More

  1. by   RainbowSkye
    No, I totally agree. I miss my cap even though I don't think I would want to wear it again. At my hospital nurses, nursing assistants, housekeeping, dietary, registration clerks all wear scrubs. So who's the nurse? If I'm confused, what aboutt the poor patient.
    I love my scrubs, but I agree. Maybe there should be some universal color for RNs. Or something else which would distinguish us, what do y'all think?
  2. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    originally posted by rainbowskye
    no, i totally agree. i miss my cap even though i don't think i would want to wear it again. at my hospital nurses, nursing assistants, housekeeping, dietary, registration clerks all wear scrubs. so who's the nurse? if i'm confused, what aboutt the poor patient.
    i love my scrubs, but i agree. maybe there should be some universal color for rns. or something else which would distinguish us, what do y'all think?
    they're nurses too!

    cheers :wink2:!
    moe
  3. by   Nurse Ratched
    Originally posted by janhetherington
    I know *all* nurses hate caps, but I think we as a profession made a big mistake when we started dressing just like the nurses' aides. Even as a practicing nurse now for many years in the same hospital, I have to get close enough to read the name tags on healthcare personnel I don't know before I can tell what their level of training is. What is wrong with nurses wearing something that distinguishes us from others? Would we feel more secure if our policemen and firemen all started wearing street clothes, and if soldiers gave up their uniforms and medals?
    Jan, I have long contended that mgt has relaxed dress codes as a way to subtly dupe the public into thinking everyone running around is a nurse. If the public knew how few actual licensed people (versus aides, housekeepers, etc.) were running around the unit, they might actually realize there is a shortage.

    I wear all whites all the time in the hospital. Don't care if it's seen as impractical; my patients know who their nurse is. I know they're not popular, but they work for me. If I had a cap and was allowed to wear it, I would.
  4. by   K O'Malley
    janhetherington, I totally agree. I guess I will betray my age too when I say that we had to wear our hair off our collar, light make-up only, short nails with no polish or clear polish. I'm sorry, but heavy make-up, popping gum, and long painted talons do not give forth a professional image. A hospital I worked at a couple of years ago required RNs to wear either all white or all navy blue and the other health care workers were color coded too. Where I work now you can tell absolutely no difference between housekeeping and nursing and a lot of times a pt will ask a housekeeper for a medication or when the doctor is coming,etc.
  5. by   julesner
    :chuckle :angryfire I'll go one better...Once, a patient referred to me as her, "handmaiden."

    Has anyone noticed that in the newly released movie, "Catch Me If You Can" the "nurses" are actually candystripers? How's that for enhancing the public's perception of nursing?
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by K O'Malley
    janhetherington, I totally agree. I guess I will betray my age too I'm sorry, but heavy make-up, popping gum, and long painted talons do not give forth a professional image.
    I SO AGREE w/you here. A big part of earning respect is the image we set forth in our daily practice. RIGHT ON!
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    When I worked nights as an LVN patients apologised for waking me up. Telling a patient I was a night nurse she said, "I thought LVN meant 'live in'".
    Asked what RN meant she answered, "Oh 'Real nurse' or 'Regular nurse'".
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by spacenurse
    When I worked nights as an LVN patients apologised for waking me up. Telling a patient I was a night nurse she said, "I thought LVN meant 'live in'".
    Asked what RN meant she answered, "Oh 'Real nurse' or 'Regular nurse'".
    EEEK OMG....!!!!
  9. by   nurse2b.com
    I have seen some awesome ADN's and awfull ADN's

    I have worked with some amazing BSN's and some clueless BSN's

    Is it really the degree that makes the "Nurse" ? ! ?!?!?!?

    We have to start supporting "nurses" instead of "eating" our own !

    Ya know what I mean ??

    BTW - I'm an ADN to BSN ...

    please check out one of our NA's website .. Nurse2B.com
  10. by   cwazycwissyRN
    Our education we recieved in school is our springboard to our careers. Very important stuff. Guess I've never had a pt. ask for her BSN or MSN, just for the RN. Most of my patients want me to focus on their needs and meet them in an educated, professional, and kind manner. It's been a while since nursing school and although I am considering furthering my education, I truly believe that continuing to educate ourselvse after school is over is what makes the difference between great, good, average or poor nurses;;;;;regardless of our titles. I hope I've learned much more about nursing in the last 12 years of being a nurse than the three years I spent in the classroom. I don't believe any of us would be spending our time surfing allnurses.com if we were not in the same boat.........leaning from each other, teaching each other, and supporting each other. Educating ourselves and keeping ourselves informed is obviously important to us all. Too bad they don't have AN.C(allnurses.com) degree because I'm finding this site addictive.

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