Is this standard?

  1. After 20+ years of nursing I am finally doing what I have discovered I really enjoy. Short term contract and PRN nursing. I work where I want and I work when I want. I'm really enjoying the variety. However, I have discovered there are a few small things that I'm not sure if it is standard or not.

    This week I spent working at a proctology clinic. Never did that before, it was actually quite educational. But my question is this, is it standard to do a pelvic on females if the dx is not a clear colorectal problem? Are proctologists doing this on a regular basis? There were two docs, one male and one female. The female was only there one afternoon so I didn't really see if she is doing the same.

    Please don't get me wrong, everything was professional, nothing weird unless this is not standard. I realized I don't know if this was appropriate and necessary or not.

    Anyone have any experience with this issue?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   UKRNinUSA
    I typed "colorectal problems AND pelvic exam" in Google and came up with something about vulvodynia - apparently one of the symptoms can be diarrhea. Check it out. BTW -did you meet any neuro-proctologists there that can help with craniosacral impactions?
    Last edit by UKRNinUSA on Nov 10, '06
  4. by   CrunchBerries
    Quote from UKRNinUSA
    I typed "colorectal problems AND pelvic exam" in Google and came up with something about vulvodynia - apparently one of the symptoms can be diarrhea. Check it out. BTW -did you meet any neuro-proctologists there that can help with craniosacral impactions?
    Wouldn't vulvodynia be treated by a GYN vs. a procto?

    No, this was a huge clinic but due to some business trips there was only one doc there for the most part during this week. I've been asked to come back on a contractual basis to do some cleaning up of staff, etc., if I do that I will have the opportunity to get you some info. This would actually be the ideal place to ask around. One of the docs is a DO/NMD, one is a colorectal surgeon, one is a homeopath. Not sure what the others are as I did not meet them. But that is likely the kind of procedures they would do.
  5. by   kukukajoo
    Female cancers (Ovarian, cervical, etc) can become metastatic to the colon and intestines causing troubles there and blockages. Fairly common in advanced cancers from what I hear.

    My grandmother had a complete intestinal blockage from ovarian cancer.
  6. by   kukukajoo
    Crunch berries- I think she means that gyn problems sometimes manifest as a procto problem and therefore they end up there first.
  7. by   CrunchBerries
    Quote from kukukajoo
    Female cancers (Ovarian, cervical, etc) can become metastatic to the colon and intestines causing troubles there and blockages. Fairly common in advanced cancers from what I hear.

    My grandmother had a complete intestinal blockage from ovarian cancer.
    True, I guess that does make sense.

    I don't know why, it just doesn't feel right. You know what I mean? Maybe I was just out of my familiar territory and that is what was feeling weird.

    First the new patients would have a consult, then the females (usually, not always) would have a pelvic exam. They'd get off the table and using the foot controls they'd be placed back on the table in a jackknife position with their fanny up in the air for the colorectal portion of the exam.

    Perhaps it was quality care but I'd rather not be one of those patients. Ins ult to injury.

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