Is this possible (need an experienced nurse's opinion-- warning a little long)

  1. I think I'm a little nutty. I'm in a RN (ADN) program--- is it possible to get a job working only one weekend shift a month?

    Here's a little background. I'm a former high school social studies teacher, and I am taking a few years off to stay home with my kids (I'll be home for 2 more years until my youngest is in first grade). Though I loved loved loved my job--- I always wondered if I would have loved nursing more (I was really torn in high school between going for education or nursing). So, anyway 3 years after I started staying home and my kids started spending a little more time in school, I started getting bored, and on a fluke--- I applied to my community college's weekend/evening nursing program (never though I'd get in since they only take 30 students a year). I got in, and I'm in my first year (went all summer taking anatomy/physiology) and am in my nursing classes and clinicals now. I have a 4.0 right now, and so far have an A in my class--- I love the clinicals--- everything's great, except I'm getting sad that I won't be teaching anymore either (I know I'm nuts)--- on top of my evening/weekend nursing program, I'm taking an online graduate education class to keep my teaching certificate "active). Does anyone think it would be possible once I graduate to get a job working one weekend a month, and maybe picking up a few shifts in the summer at a hospital down the shore (my sons and I usually go back and forth between here and the shore during the summer since my parents live there)--- would anyone hire a newby for only one weekend a month (I don't need benefits or anything, it would just supplement my teaching salary)?? Just wondering. My husband thinks I'm nuts, but the community college nursing program was so inexpensive, and I'm there pretty much after my kids are getting ready for bed--- clinicals are weekend mornings (it's been great bonding time for my husband and boys--- I figured why not). Just wondering if this is possible or do I really have to choose between one career or the other. I really love them both. I know I'm nuts. I went to real estate school too while I've been home (did that two nights a week the first year I was home full time)--- I love school.
    Last edit by WestWingFan on Nov 2, '07
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   4theBetterGetter
    You aren't nuts! Nurses are teachers, too. Combine the two and become a nurse educator! Best of both your professions
  4. by   maybe1day
    Well, why don't you look into being a nursing instructor?

    I also love teaching, but wanted the flexibility of nursing. I hope to complete my studies, work as an RN for a while and then look in becoming a nursing instructor.

    I think you might could find it is the best of both worlds for you!!

    Good Luck in whateve you decide.
  5. by   FireStarterRN
    Yes it's possible, many hospitals will work out creative schedules. Often they need extra weekend help. Go for it!
  6. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Well, I think you may have to do at least a year full-time after nursing school. Most per diem position will require some previous experience, not just nursing school. But after that, I'm sure that you should have no problem doing that if you choose.

    And, again like the poster above stated, in nursing you will also be in education.

    Kris
  7. by   WestWingFan
    Thanks everyone!!!! I could definitely do nursing full time for a year, because I'll have one more year until my son starts 1st grade (I could nurse full time--- doing some weekend overnight shifts, but I couldn't work as a teacher full time until he's in school)--- thanks!!!!!
  8. by   MBsGirl
    I know a nurse who went back to get her teaching degree. She works a weekend or two a month, then does some in the summer, teaches fulltime at a middle school. So there's no reason to give up either career that you like! It's nice to have various options, too! good luck!
  9. by   snowfreeze
    School nurse would be interesting opportunity if you want to pursue that.
  10. by   gonzo1
    After you graduate you can find a part time nursing job (most likely in a hospital). After you get some experience (work at least 20 hours per week if possible) then you will be able to go to work for a nursing agency and work virtually any time, any day you want.
    You will probably get hooked on nursing and want to do more than you are currently anticipating. There is a lot of patient education in nursing and it is very rewarding as well.
    Congratulations and good luck in your endeavors
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from WestWingFan
    Does anyone think it would be possible once I graduate to get a job working one weekend a month, - would anyone hire a newby for only one weekend a month?

    In a word, NO. You will require at least one year of full-time experience as a nurse before you will be considered for part-time or per diem positions. That's pretty much universal, if you are able to get a schedule that you are talking about without at least one year of experience then that will be an extremely rare occurrence.

    I won't go into all the options you will have with a nursing degree and a teaching degree, suffice to say they are many. Good luck.
  12. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    In a word, NO. You will require at least one year of full-time experience as a nurse before you will be considered for part-time or per diem positions. That's pretty much universal, if you are able to get a schedule that you are talking about without at least one year of experience then that will be an extremely rare occurrence.

    I won't go into all the options you will have with a nursing degree and a teaching degree, suffice to say they are many. Good luck.
    That's not accurate. I've never worked fulltime and was able to work into an ICU setting eventually by working parttime my whole nursing career.
  13. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from jlsRN
    That's not accurate. I've never worked fulltime and was able to work into an ICU setting eventually by working parttime my whole nursing career.

    Could you give a few more details? When did you begin your career? In what setting? I only worked full-time the first year myself; I never could stand to do bedside care full-time however, it would be extremely rare for a new grad with no experience to get a position working only one weekend a month. Let's not mislead the OP. You may have been able to do it but are you willing to admit that the chances of others doing that are extremely low.
  14. by   WestWingFan
    I did say that I could work full time my first year as I can't go back to teaching until 3 years from now (when my son starts first grade)---- I could work full time nursing that year though by working combinations of weekend and overnight shifts. so working full time for at least a year will work for me, I just want to make sure that going back to teaching and nursing at some point is an option. Thanks

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